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Full text of "The biographical record of De Kalb County, Illinois"

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THE 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



DE KALB COUNTY 



LLINOIS. 



II^I^I_JSTF^.^a^EL3 



propU- Ihot take I/O pride it, Ihe iiohlc aclihviiiiciiif of remote ,7//eestnr.s -c/7/ mver eie]n 
aiivtliiiiii v:ortJiy to he run, ii/luree/ velth / ritfe hv remote <;( iie rat ions ." —ls\ .\^.- .\Vi.\:\ 



■ CHICAGO: 

The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company. 
1S98. 

SAUK VALLEY CGLLKE 

L.R.C. 



093817 



Biography is the only true history.' 



.MERSdX. 



PREFACK. 




i>h Entilish historians, A[acalu.a\-, and unc of the most 
tLis ot tiie present centiuy, has said : " Tlie history of a 
est told in a record of the lives of its people." In con- 
I I his idei, the Biographical Record has been prepared. 
niiL, to mustj' records, and tal<ino- tiierefrom dry statistical 



ited 



rorps 



writer; 



Iho^e conipi i^ni^ 

stiuggles 2so nioie iiiteie 

public In this \oluni-^ \m1 

of coming genei itions 11 

economy have accumulateil 

an education, have become 

the length and breadth of tl 

life to eminence as statesii 

every walk in life wiio ha 

crowned their efforts. It t( 

world, have pmsued the '■ e 

said of the woman ]ierforn 

tells how many, in the prid' 

lawyer's oHice and the counting-room 



the people, the men and women who have, bjr their enterprise 
usti\ , biought these counties to a rank second to none among 
noble State, and from their lips have the story of their life 
nig 01 mstuictive matter could be presented to an intelligent 
be found t lecord of many whose lives are worth}' the imitation 
tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industrj- and 
•ealth. It tells how others, witii limited advantages for securing 
;arned men and women, with an influence extending throughout 
land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of 
n, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in 
.■ striven to succeed, and records how that success has usually 
Is also of many, very many, who, not seeking the applause of the 
L-n tenor of their way," content to have it said of them, as Christ 
ig a deed of mercy — "They have done what they could.'' It 
anel strength of young manhood, left the plow and the anvil, the 
t every trade and profession, and at their country's 



call went forth valiantly " to do or die," and how through their efforts the Union was 
restored and peace once more reigned in the land. In the life of every man and of every 
woman is a lesson that shmild not be lost upon those who follow after. 

Coming generations will appreciate this volume and preserve it as a sacred treasure, from 
the fact that it contains so much that would never find its way into public records, and which 
would otherwise be inaccessible. Great care has been taken in the compilation of the work, 
and every opportunity possible given to those represented to insure correctness in what has 
been written ; and the publisliers (latter themselves that they give to their readers a work with 
few errors of consequence. In addition to biographical sketches, portraits of a number of 
representative citizens are given. 

The faces of some, and biographical sketches of many, will be missed in this volume. 
For this the publishers are not to blame. Not having a proper conception of the work, some 
refused to give the information necessary to compile a sketch, while others were indifferent. 
Occasionally some member of the family would oppose the enterprise, and on account of such 
opposition the support of the interested one would be withheld. In a few instances men 
never could bj found, though repeated calls were made at their residence or place of business. 



Xo\ember. isO,^ 



The 



T. Ci 



G Co. 




GEN. DANIEL DUSTIN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 



GENERAL DANIEL DUSTIX. —Among 
the many citizens of De Kalb county, 
who have attained distinction in civil and 
military life, is the subject of this memoir, 
who probably was personally known to more 
of the people of the county than any other 
man that ever resided within its borders, 
and whose friends were legion. He was 
born in the town of Topsham, Orange coun- 
ty, Vermont, October 5, 1820, and was the 
son of John Tonight and Sallie (Thompson) 
Dustin, the former a native of Atkinson, 
New Hampshire born January 24, 1784, 
and the latter born in Newbury, Ver- 
mont, January 15, 1788. They were the 
parents of thirteen children, eight of whom 
lived to maturity and were married. John 
Iv. Dustin, who was a farmer by occupa- 
tion, died in Topsham, Vermont, in August, 
185S. His wife preceded him many j'ears, 
dying December 14, 1829, also at Topsham, 
Vermont. 

The Dustin family is of Scotch and 
English descent, our subject tracing his an- 
cestry back to Thomas and Hannah Dustin, 
of Haverhill, Massachusetts, who were 
married in 1677. She was the daughter of 
Michael and Hannah (Webster) Emerson, 
and was born at Haverhill, Massachusetts, 
December 23, 1657. Hannah Dustin was 
the heroine of an e.xploit famous in the 
early annals of New England. She was 
taken prisoner by the Indians, in the attack 



on Haverhill, March 15, 169S. Her nurse 
and an infant one year old were also taken, 
but the child was soon afterwards killed. 
She was taken to an island in the Merrimac, 
afterwards known as Dustin's Island, and 
with her were twelve Indians. One night, 
with the aid of the nurse and a white cap- 
tive boy, she killed all the Indians in their 
sleep, except a squaw and a boj- who 
escaped. She then returned to Haverhill 
with their scalps. 

The paternal grandfather of our sub- 
ject was Nathaniel Dustin, who was born 
September 8, 1756, and who died March 3, 
1815. He married Judith Knight, who was 
born May 2, 1756, and who died June 3, 
1842. 

The subject of this sketch grew to man- 
hood in his nati\e town and county, and 
after attending the subscription schools, was 
a student in the famous old academy at 
Newbury, Vermont. After studying medi- 
cine at Topsham and Corinth, he attended 
three full courses of medical lectures at 
Dartsmouth College, Hanover, New Hamp- 
shire, at a time when Oliver Wendell Holmes 
was professor of anatomy. From that in- 
stitution he was graduated November 18, 
1846, and immediately commenced the 
practice of his profession at Corinth, in his 
native county. While residing there he was 
married at Topsham, Vermont, in 1846, to 
Miss Isabel Taplin, a daughter of Colonel 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Gouldsburn Taplin, of Corinth, Vermont. 
Bj' this union there were three children. 
Emma married William Myers, of Carth- 
age, Missouri. Electa married Walter Water- 
man, a grocer of Sycamore, Illinois. William 
G. is editor of a paper at D wight, Illinois, and 
is also postmaster of that city. In August, 
1850, a few months after Dr. Dustin left 
Vermont, Mrs. Dustin died. 

The discovery of gold in California 
caused great e.\citement throughout the 
length and breadth of the land, and every 
state in the union sent its representatives 
to the New Eldorado. In the spring of 
1850, Dr. Dustin started for the land of 
gold, sailing from New York, on the steam- 
er Georgia, March 13. Landing at Charles- 
ton, South Carolina, a number of slaves 
were brought on board, which was his tirst 
glimpse of slavery as it then' existed in 
the south. It was a strange sight to him, 
and the incident was firmly fixed in mem- 
ory, causing him afterwards to become a 
thorough anti-slavery man. From Charles- 
ton he went to Panama, and crossing the 
Isthmus, reached San Francisco the mid- 
dle of June of that year. He was accom- 
panied by several partners, and they took 
with them a dredging machine to wash the 
gold from submerged bars, but sold the 
same immediately on their arrival for a 
large advance. After selling the dredger, 
Dr. Dustin went first to Benecia, and later 
to Sacramento, and in the latter place en- 
gaged in the practice of his profession. 
Going to the mining regions at Hangtown, 
he engaged in mining for a time, but finally 
drifted into the French Corral in Nevada 
county, at which place he met the lady 
who later became his wife, and at Spring 
\'alley, California, October 15, 1S54, the 
Doctor was united in marriage with Miss 



Elmira Pauly, a native of Lebanon, Ohio, 
and a daughter of Aaron Pauly, also a 
native of the same state, whose father emi- 
grated from western Germany to Amer- 
ica in the early part of the century. Aaron 
Pauly married Lydia Birdsall, a native of 
Wilmington, Ohio, and a daughter of Daniel 
and Zada (Hinman) Birdsall. Elmira was 
their only child. Her mother dying, her 
father later married, and in 1849 went to 
California, and was followed in 1852 by 
his second wife and family. Aaron Pauly 
was a merchant tailor in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
but engaged in the general mercantile busi- 
ness in California. He retired from busi- 
ness about 1884, and died in San Diego, 
California, in 1890. By this second union 
Dr. Dustin had one child, Zada, wife of 
John C. Craft, cashier of the Bankers Na- 
tional Bank, Chicago. 

On locating in Nevada county, Cali- 
fornia, Dr. Dustin engaged in the mercan- 
tile trade, and also in the practice of his 
profession, his services being more in de- 
mand in cases of surgery than in medicine. 
Cuttings and shootings were quite frequent, 
while the climate was remarkably healthy. 
W'hile there he gave some attention to sur- 
face mining with fair success. He also 
mingled in political affairs, and in 1 85 5-6 
he was chosen to represent Nevada county 
in the legislature of that state. 

Having seen enough of California, he de- 
termined to again return east, but instead 
of returning to his own home, came to 
Sycamore, Illinois, where he became asso- 
ciated with J. E. and Chauncey Ellwood, 
in the mercantile business, continuing with 
them until the outbreak of the Civil war. 
He enlisted first in the Eighth Illinois Cav- 
alry, and by Governor Yates was commis- 
sioned captain, January 3, 1862, taking the 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



rank from September i, 1861, and was pro- 
moted major in 1862, ranking from January 
8, 1862. In March, 1862, his regiment 
joined in the general advance on Manassas, 
in General Sumner's division. In the early 
part of the spring of that year, at four dif- 
ferent times it drove the enemy across the 
Rappahannock. His regiment did impor- 
tant service at Gaines Hill and Malvern 
Hill, leading the advance on the second oc- 
cupation of Malvern Hill, and with Benson's 
Battery, United States Artillery, bore the 
brunt of the fight, and brought up the rear 
of our retreating forces at Barrett's Ford 
and at Chickahominy. At the opening of 
the Seven Days Fight, Major Dustin was in 
command of a squadron of the Eighth, on 
the extreme right of our lines, and where 
the rebel troops first encountered the Union 
army. The first volley of musketry on the 
first day of that memorable succession of 
engagements, was tired at Major Dustin, his 
orderly and a captain of his command, b}- 
the advance guard of the enemy at close 
range, the captain being shot down by the 
Major's side. 

In July, 1862, Major Dustin resigned, 
came home, and assisted in raising the One 
Hundred and Fifth Regiment Illinois \'ol- 
unteer Infantry, which was mustered into 
the service September 2, 1862, at Dixon, Illi- 
nois. Major Dustin received the commis- 
sion of colonel, October 4, 1862, ranking 
from September i, 1862, and was placed in 
command of the regiment. Soon after 
muster, the regiment joined the Army of 
the Cumberland, with which it remained 
throughout the war. In the spring of 1S64, 
with the One Hundred and Second and One 
Hundred and Twenty-ninth Illinois, the 
Seventieth Indiana and Se\'enty-ninth 
Ohio, the regiment formed the First Bri- 



gade, Third Division of the Twentieth Army 
Corps. After the Atlanta campaign. Colonel 
Dustin was placed in command of the Sec- 
ond Brigade of the same division and corps, 
and remained its commander during the 
war. He accompanied General Sherman 
in his march to the sea, and after the bat- 
tle of Averysboro, North Carolina, he was 
breveted brigadier-general, a promotion 
which was well deserved. His commission 
was received April 9, 1866, ranking from 
March 16, 1865, and given for gallant serv- 
ices in the campaign in Georgia and South 
Carolina. Marching with his brigade to 
Washington, he participated in the grand 
review, and June 7, 1865, was mustered 
out of the service, having made a record of 
which he might well be proud. Returning 
home, in the summer of 1865, General 
Dustin was nominated on the Republican 
ticket for the office of county clerk, and was 
duly elected in November following, and 
served a term of four years. He was. later 
elected county treasurer and served a 
term of two j'ears, and in 1880 was 
elected circuit clerk, re-elected in 1884, 
and again in 1 888. He resigned the latter 
office and by President Harrison was ap- 
pointed. May 2, 1890, sub-treasurer of the 
United States treasury at Chicago. In the 
latter office he served with distinguished 
ability until his death at Carthage, Mis- 
souri, March 30, 1892, while on a visit to 
his daughter. During the construction of 
the Soldiers' and Sailors' Home at Ouincy, 
Illinois, he was president of the board of 
trustees. 

From the organization of the party un- 
til his death. General Dustin was a consist- 
ent Republican. In the councils of his 
party, his views always commanded re- 
spect, and his advice was generally found 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



to be correct. Twice was he the choice of 
the Republicans of De Kalb county for 
congress, but withdrew in favor of personal 
friends. In the various political campaigns 
he took an active part, and did yeoman 
service for his party. Fluent of speech, 
and possessing rare grace and power of 
oratory, he was a most effective stump 
speaker. Fraternally, he was a Mason of 
high standing, having attained the thirty- 
second degree. In 1S72, he was elected 
right eminent commander of the grand 
commandery of Ivnight Templars of Illi- 
nois, a position which he creditably filled. 
He was appointed representative of New 
Jersey in the Illinois grand lodge. Relig- 
iously, he was a member of the Congrega- 
tional church, of which body his wife and 
daughters are also members. As a friend 
and neighbor he was universally loved and 
respected, and his death left a void which 
can never be filled. 



ALBERT F. ROWLEY, photographer, 
has a pleasant suite of rooms at No. 
245 Main street, De I\alb, Illinois. The 
growth and development of photography 
has been one of the most striking results of 
the last century of progress. A perfection of 
results has been obtained, which marks the 
highest type of artistic development. In- 
deed there is no branch of art which has 
made such rapid strides in so short a time, 
and it is thought that the time is not far 
distant when landscape scenes will be pro- 
duced by means of photography in their 
natural colors, thus combining truth, art 
and nature. Photography is indeed one of 
the fine arts, and the successful photogra- 
pher must be an artist in the true sense of 
the term. Such we find Mr. Rowley to be. 



He is a young man of progressive ideas, 
thoroughly in love with his art, and has con- 
stantly adopted the latest devices for pro- 
ducing superior work. A visit to the studio 
of Mr. Rowley is a rare treat to the lover 
of true beauty in art. It is ornamented 
with many specimens from the camera, 
brush and pencil of Mr. and Mrs. Rowley 
(the latter being an artist of high merit), 
and afford the best possible evidence of the 
genius and skill which is brought to bear in 
the management of this establishment. 

Mr. Rowley was born in Rochelle, Ogle 
county, Illinois, May 18, 1864, and is the 
son of Thomas and Susan Rowley. His 
father is one of the oldest settlers in Ogle 
county, having resided there for more than 
forty years. He owns a valuable farm of 
two hundred acres, and is a well known and 
influential man in the community where he 
resides, having been honored by his fellow 
citizens with various local ofUces of honor 
and trust. He is a native of Syracuse, 
New York. 

Our subject grew to manhood in his na- 
tive county, and was educated in the public 
schools. He early evinced a taste for art, 
and began to practice photography as an 
amateur, first at Aurora. He saw then, as 
all young aspirants should see, "room at 
the top" and began preparations to (ill it. 
While residing in Aurora, on June i, 1893, 
he married Miss Eva E. Shippee, the daugh- 
ter of Silas H. and Ann Shippee. Shortly 
after his marriage, he 'went to Chicago, 
placing himself under the instruction of 
Hoyt & Gale, to perfect himself in his pro- 
fession. Returning to Aurora, he remained 
there a short time, and in 1896 moved to 
De Kalb, where he purchased the establish- 
ment and good will of Mr. Oleson, since 
which time his business has increased four- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



13 



fold. His establishment is supplied with 
the most perfect apparatus and an admira- 
bly adapted arrangement for securing the 
proper light and shade, to produce the de- 
sired results. His reception room is spa- 
cious, and handsomely and appropriately 
furnished. In addition to his regular busi- 
ness, he keeps a full line of amateur sup- 
plies. His work consists of commercial 
landscapes, craj-on, new process bromide, 
lantern slides, stereoscopic and colored 
work, in fact everything in the line of pho- 
tography. His wife ably assists him in his 
fine work, especially in retouching, which is 
executed by what is termed the retouching 
device, worked by electricity. Airs. Row- 
ley has many students under her, who prac- 
tice with pencil and brush. 



HON. GEORGE STEWART ROBIN- 
SON was for years a well known citi- 
zen of Sycamore, Illinois, a lawyer of rec- 
ognized ability, one who enjoyed the respect 
and confidence of the entire community. He 
was a native of Derby, Vermont, born June 
24. 1S24, and was second in the family of 
three sons born to George and Harriet 
(Stewart) Robinson. His father was a na- 
tive of Connecticut, and the son of Eber 
Robinson, a captain in the war of the Rev- 
olution. His mother was a native of Ver- 
mont and a daughter of Rufus Stewart, 
a major in the war of 18 12. George Rob- 
inson was by occupation a farmer, and also 
served his country faithfully during the war 
of 1812. He died about 1870, when about 
seventy-five years old. 

In his native city, our subject received 
his primary education in the common 
schools, and later attended the Derby Acad- 
emy. When nineteen years old he entered 



the law office of Hon. S. B. Colby, at Der- 
by, and began his professional studies. After 
reading under Mr. Colby's instruction for 
two years, he finished his legal course with 
Hon. Lucius B. Peck, of Montpelier, one 
of Vermont's most prominent attorneys, 
and was admitted to the bar of his native 
state November 18, 1846. On account of 
close application to his studies, his health 
failed, and with the hope of its restoration, 
in 1S47, he went south, where he was oc- 
cupied in teaching. In 1853 he returned to 
Vermont, and in his native town, October 
13, he married Olive A. Colby, also a na- 
tive of Derby, and a daughter of Nehemiah 
Colby, and a granddaughter of Samuel Col- 
by, both of whom were natives of New 
Hampshire. Nehemiah Colby was for many 
years engaged in the mercantile trade, and 
also followed the occupation of farming for 
a time. For some fifteen years he was 
postmaster of Derby, and was one of its 
best known men. Religiously he was a 
Congregationalist, and a firm believer in the 
Christian religion. His death occurred in 
1S62, at the age of seventy-five years, be- 
ing preceded by his wife, Malinda Larra- 
bee, born in 1790. and a daughter of John 
Larrabee. She died in 1842, at the age of 
fifty-two years. They were the parents of 
thirteen children, of whom Mrs. Robinson 
was twelfth in order of birth. 

Immediately after their marriage, Mr. 
and Mrs. Robinson went to Cuthbert, 
Georgia, and he began the practice of law 
in that city, where he resided during the 
trying times of the Civil war. For a few 
months during the war, much against his 
will, he was compelled to serve in the 
Georgia State Militia. Being a well known 
Union man, he suffered many inconven- 
iences, and his practice was completely 



14 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



broken up. Having a cousin residing in 
Sycamore, Illinois, by his invitation, he 
came to this place in 1866, and soon after- 
ward became associated with Hon. Charles 
Kellum, a partnership which continued for 
four years. He then continued alone until his 
election as county judge in 1877, a position 
which he continued to hold until 1882, when 
he resigned to attend to private business in 
Vermont. 

For several years prior to his election as 
judge of the county court, he held the posi- 
tion of master in chancery, which position 
he resigned soon after his election. When 
Sycamore was organized as a city, he was 
elected alderman and served two terms. He 
was also city attorney, and drafted the ordi- 
nances under which the city was governed 
for years, many of which are still in force. 
In 1869, he was appointed on the board of 
state commissioners of public charities for 
the state of Illinois, by Governor John M. 
Palmer, was re-appointed by Governor John 
L. Beveridge, in 1874, and again by Gover- 
nor Shelby M. Cullom, in 1879. He was 
an active member of the board until March, 
1884, when he resigned, being unable to 
attend to the duties of the position by reason 
of absence from the state on business de- 
manding his entire time. For nearly fifteen 
years he was a member of the board, and 
was its president for nine years, devoting 
from two to three months of his time each 
year to its work, spending much more than 
he received for his services. 

To Judge and Mrs. Robinson three chil- 
dren were born: Harriet M., Lucius P. and 
Nellie C. , the second named dying in In- 
fancy. Harriet M. , who was born in Georgia, 
married C. L. Buchan, of Rockford, 111. , and 
they have one son, George Buchan Robin- 
son, the son having been adopted by the 



Judge to bear his name. He is now at the 
Morgan Park Academy, a preparatory school 
for the Chicago University. Nellie C. mar- 
ried James B. Ellwood, and died in 1892, 
and was soon followed by her only child, a 
daughter, Muriel Olive. 

Judge Robinson was a man of more than 
ordinary ability, was well read in the law, 
and withal was endowed with good com- 
mon sense. As judge of the county and 
probate courts no man ever filled the posi- 
tion in a more satisfactory manner. His 
popularity with the bar and the people was 
always maintained, and he was always con- 
sidered an able lawyer, and a safe counsel- 
lor. As a member of the state board of 
public charities, he made a state reputation 
and notwithstanding he receixed no compen- 
sation, he devoted his time just as faithfully 
and as energetically as though he was re- 
ceiving a handsome salary. He was always 
interested in educational affairs, and gave 
much of his time to advance the interests of 
the school, being president of the school 
board at the time of his death. Frater- 
nall\-, he v.-as a Mason, holding membership 
in the blue lodge, chapter and command- 
ery. He was a man of e.xcellent qualities 
of head and heart, and his friends were 
numerous, not only throughout De Kalb 
county, but the entire state. His death, 
which occurred October 30, i S94, left a void 
which could not well be filled. 



EDWIN GILSON, deceased, was well- 
known throughout DeKalb county, as a 
man of upright character, one whom to know 
was to love. He was born in Westminster, 
\'ermont, December 27, iSii, and was the 
son of Michael Gilson, who was also born in 
^^'estminster, in 1782, and who died in 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1852. His father, Zackariah Gilson, was 
born in 1736, and died in 1804. He mar- 
ried Hannah Patch, who died in 1826, at 
the age of eight3'-four years. Zackariah 
moved from Massachusetts, in an early day, 
and built a house in which three generations 
were born. Michael Gilson married Eunice 
Haywood, born in 1783, and died in 1838. 
She was the daughter of Deacon David 
Haywood, who was a descendant of John 
Haywood, who was born in Concord, Mas- 
sachusetts, in 1633, and who attained the 
age of sixty-seven years. His son. Deacon 
John Haywood, was born in the same place 
in 1662, and died at the age of fifty years. 
He was the father of Samuel Haywood, born 
in Concord, in 1687, and who died at the 
age of sixty-three years. Charles, the son 
of Samuel, was born inWinchendon in 1723, 
and died at the age of eighty-six years. He 
was the father of Deacon David, who was 
born in 1755, and died at the age of seventy- 
one years. The latter married in 1780, .Abi- 
gail Bixby, whose mother, Jerusha Hough- 
ton, was of an old English family. Abigail 
died at Weathersfield, Massachusetts, in 
1824. Deacon David Haywood enlisted at 
Holden, Vermont, in 1777, and served two 
years in the revolutionary army, being at 
one time stationed at \\'est Point. To 
Deacon David Haywood and wife, a daugh- 
ter, Eunice, was born in 1783. She mar- 
ried Michael Gilson, and bore him five sons: 
Michael, Jr., Solon, Edwin, Ira and Charles. 
The latter for many years was professor of 
modern languages in Williams college. 

The subject of this sketch was reared on 
the home farm, and in his boyhood attended 
the common schools. He early assumed 
charge of the farm, and consequently his 
school life was limited. He was self-edu- 
cated in later life, having mastered algebra 



alone, and studied astronomy, knowing all 
the principal constellations and stars by 
name. He was a omniverous reader, with 
mind clear to the end of life, hand steady 
and writing clear, regular and distinct at the 
age of eighty years. 

He was married in Putney, \'ermont. 
May 20, 1845, to Miss Fanny Evans, born 
in Athens, Vermont, October i, 18 16, and 
who is yet living, and making her home 
with her daughter, Mrs. Mary G. Shurtleff. 
She is the daughter of Roswell Evans, who 
married Jerusha Chaffee. By this union 
three children were born. Solon died in 
infancy. Carrie died unmarried at the age 
of twenty-five years. Mary G. , who was 
born at Westminster, \'ermont, in the Con- 
necticut valley, in the house where her 
father and grandfather were born, received 
a good education and inherited her father's 
bright mind. As successful teacher, she 
found her father a great help in school work 
and always went to him with difficult prob- 
lems. A member of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church, she is active in church work, 
being a willing worker in the cause of her 
master. She was married June 4, 18S5, to 
Ephraim Shurtleff, a descendant of one of 
the old pioneer families of DeKalb county. 

In the fall of 1855, ^^- Gilson visited a 
brother in Wisconsin, and after looking over 
a portion of that state and also a portion of 
northern Illinois, he decided to settle in 
Del\alb county. Purchasing a farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres near Cortland, in 
Cortland township, and in the spring of 
1856, brought his family from Vermont and 
at once engaged in farming. He became a 
well known and influential man in the town- 
ship, and for several years served as super- 
visor from the township and also as asses- 
sor. He lived on the farm until 1867, when 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



he removed to Sycamore, where he pur- 
chased eight acres north of the city, which 
he cultivated in order that he might have 
something to keep him busy. He wqs for 
sixty-five years a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and was very active in 
church work, being for years chairman of 
its official board. He attended all meetings 
of the chprch, and was a liberal giver in its 
support. He was never sick in his life, 
never seemed old but always young in heart 
and mind — a man that everybody respected 
and loved. He passed away April 21, 1891. 



HON. CHARLES KELLUM, late judge 
of the twelfth judicial circuit, now the 
sixteenth circuit, had the reputation of being 
one of the best judges that ever occupied 
the bench in the state, a state that has 
always been distinguished for the high rank 
of her bench and bar. In him were found 
united many of the rare qualities which go 
to make up the successful lawyer and jurist. 
He was born March 16, 1S21, in Susque- 
hanna county, Penns3-lvania, and is the son 
of Samuel and Lucretia (Eldridge) Kellum, 
the former a native of Connecticut, born in 
New London county, October 19, 1783, and 
the latter in the same county, November 
27, 1786. The maternal grandfather, 
James Eldridge, and the maternal grand- 
mother, Sarah (Newton) Eldridge, were 
also born in the same county. The former 
was born November 16, 1753, and died 
August 2, 1841. The latter was born De- 
cember 17, 1757, and died August 6, 1824. 
Samuel Kellum, the father, was a son of 
Samuel Kellum, Sr., a native of Connecti- 
cut, who served as captain in the militia, 
and was otherwise prominent in the affairs 
of the state. The father was also a prom- 



inent man in the state, and likewise served 
as captain in the militia. He was a Mason 
of high standing in the order, and the Judge 
treasures among his possessions a notice 
sent his father of which the following is a 
copy; 

"Companion Samuel Kellum: 

"You are requested to atten i the duties 
of Franklin Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, 
at Newcome Kunys, their chamber of con- 
vocation, in the city of Norwich, on Wednes- 
day next, at five o'clock P. M., on special 
business. 

"Norwich, ist March, A. D. 1809. 

"Joseph Powers, Sec'y F. C. 

"By order of the M. E. H. P." 

By occupation Samuel Kellum, the fa- 
ther, was a farmer, which vocation he fol- 
lowed during his entire residence in the 
state. Politically he was a Whig, having 
an abiding faith in the principles of that 
party. With it he continued to act until 
the formation of the Republican party 
when, on account of its liberty loving prin- 
ciples, he gave adhesion to it, and continued 
to act with it during the remainder of his life. 
In 1866, he came west and made his home 
with the Judge, where his death occurred 
Januar}' 2, 1869. His wife, who was a na- 
tive of New London county, Connecticut, 
survived him ten years, dying at Prophets- 
town, Illinois, Januar\' 2, 1879. Samuel 
Kelhmi was a large, athletic man, over six 
feet in height, and strongly built. He was 
over eighty-five years old when his death 
occurred, while his wife was over ninety- 
two 3ears old when she departed this life. 
They were the parents of seven children: 
Samuel, Elizabeth, Isaac S., Ann E., Hen- 
ry F., Charles and \\'illiam C. All are de- 
ceased but our subject. 




HON. CHARLES KELLUM. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Charles- Kellum, our subject, received 
his primary education in the district school, 
and was then sent to iMannington academy 
and boarding school, in Susquehanna coun- 
ty, where he passed through all the courses. 
He then began the study of law at Mont- 
rose, Pennsylvania, in the office of Lusk & 
Little, where he read law about two and a 
half years, and in 1844 was admitted to 
the bar. With his preceptors he remained 
two years on a salar}', and then went home 
to his father's farm in Bradford county, and 
gave his time to outdoor pursuits in order 
that he might recover his health, which had 
been impaired by close study and work for 
more than four years. After the recovery 
of his health, he went to Towanda, Brad- 
ford county, where he opened an office, and 
commenced the practice of his profession. 
He continued there in practice about four 
years; during a year and a half he was' in 
partnership with the late Judge Henry 
Booth. 

In 1854, Mr. Kellum started for the 
great west, coming on the Erie railroad to 
LaPorte, Indiana, where he remained about 
one year with his brother, Isaac S. Kellum, 
who was engaged in the banking business at 
that place. While there he assisted his 
brother in the office, and got an insight into 
the banking business. Leaving LaPorte, he 
came to Sycamore, Illinois, arriving March 
17, 1S55, when he formed a partnership 
with William Fordham, under the firm name 
of Fordham & Kellum, which lasted one 
year. He was then alone for a time, after 
which at different times he had various part- 
ners, the firms being Kellum & Webster, 
Kellum & Robinson, Mayo, Kellum & Chase, 
Kellum & Cames, Kellum & Stephens and 
Kellum & Balliet. In 1879 he received the 
nomination from the Republican judicial 



convention for judge of the twelfth circuit, 
and was duly elected. The circuit at that 
time embraced DeKalb, Boone, McHenry, 
Lake, Ivane, DuPage and Kendall counties. 
He was re-elected in 1885, and again in 
1 891, serving until 1897, when he retired 
from the bench. His eighteen years on the 
bench was one of arduous labor. He is 
now engaged only as counselor, and does 
not try cases in court. 

Judge Ivellum was married March 15, 
1855, at LaPorte, Indiana, to Miss Chloe 
Clement, a native of LaPorte, Indiana, and 
a daughter of William and Caroline (Reed) 
Clement, both of whom were from Erie, 
Pennsylvania. By this union two children 
were born. The eldest, William C, was 
born in Sycamore, December 14, 1855, and 
was educated at Todd's school, at Wood- 
stock, Illinois. He studied law in his 
father's office and was admitted to the bar 
in 1878, and at once commenced practice. 
He is a good attorney, and is worthy to 
wear the mantle of his .distinguished sire. 
He married Laura McKinnon, by whom he 
lias one child, Charles S. The Judge's 
second son, Samuel, was born December 22, 
1857, is married and has one child, Charles. 
He is in business in Chicago, where he has 
made many friends. Mrs. Kellum departed 
this life, January 24, 1898, deeply mourned 
by all who knew her, being a woman who 
won the hearts of all. 

From 1 868 to 1872 Mr. Ivellum was 
state's attorney for the then thirteenth cir- 
cuit, during which time he had the prosecu- 
tion of several murder cases. As an advo- 
cate he was quite strong, always holding the 
attention of the jury and the respect of the 
court. During his long service on the 
bench, he was always regarded as a fair, im- 
partial and able judge. He had the faculty 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of establishing precedents when there were 
none, and his ruHngs were generally sus- 
tained bj' the higher courts. After a con- 
tinuous service of eighteen years upon the 
bench, he voluntarily retired, on account of 
approaching old age, and by the bar was 
presented with a set of resolutions of respect 
and a gold-headed cane, as a mark of re- 
spect and appreciation. His decisions were 
always made upon the basis of equality and 
justice, and were marked by the large 
amount of common sense with which nature 
and ripe experience so liberally endowed 
him. 

Judge Kellum is a Mason, and has at- 
tained the rank of Knight Templar. Polit- 
ically he is a Republican, and although 
never a partisan, he has served his party as 
a delegate to various state conventions. It 
is, however, as a lawyer and a judge that he 
will always be remembered. In the- midst 
of friends, who hold him in the highest re- 
gard, he is now enjoying the fruits that 
come to a noble and well spent life. 



ADOLPH LEIFHEIT, who resides on 
section i8. Squaw Grove township, is 
a representative of that class of German- 
American citizens who ha\'e been instru- 
ment';l in developing the waste places 
of this land, and who, by their industrious and 
thrifty habits, usually place themselves in 
comfortable circumstances, that their last 
days may be spent in ease and comfort. The 
subject of this sketch is the owner of a 
valuable farm of three hundred and twenty 
acres, lying three miles west of Hinckley, 
which he has under the highest state of cul- 
tivation. He was born on the farm where 
he now resides July 24, 1857, and is the son 
of William Leifheit, a native of Germany, 



born in 182 i, and who grew to manhood in 
his native country, and there married Caro- 
line Eckhart, also a native of Germany. 
Together they emigrated to the New World 
about 1845, and first located in Kendallcoun- 
ty, where he went to work on a farm by the 
month. Later he rented land in Kendall 
county, and engaged in farming for himself. 
After residing in Kendall county for a few 
years, he moved to De Kalb county, and 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres in 
Squaw Grove township, which comprises a 
part of the present farm of our subject. On 
locating here he built a small frame house, 
and began the improvement of the place. 
Later he purchased more land, and finally 
was the owner of eight eighty-acre tracts, 
or six hundred and forty acres in all, and 
which all lay in one body. Year by year the 
improvements went on, now a barn, then 
some other outbuilding, then the tiling of 
the land, until it resulted in one of the most 
productive far-iis in the entire county. He 
was a very successful farmer, and actively 
engaged in that vocation until about 1884, 
when he rented the place and has since lived 
a retired life. He is now seventy-seven 
years old, and a well-preseived man. His 
wife died about 1892. They were the pa- 
rents of eleven children, all of whom grew 
to mature 3'ears, while nine are yet living, 
three daughters and six sons. 

Adolph Leifheit was fifth in order of 
birth, and grew to manhood on the farm 
and was educated in the common schools of 
Squaw Grove township. He remained with 
his father until he attained his majority 
and render faithful assistance in the improve- 
ment of the place. He was married in De- 
Kalb county, March 14, 1 88 1, to Miss 
Louisa Granart, a native of the county and 
a daughter of Ferdinand Granart, a sub- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



21 



stantial farmer of Squaw Grove township, 
and who was originally from Germany. 
After his marriage he rented one hundred 
and sixty acres of his father's farm, which 
he operated for five years, and then returned 
to the old home, which he rented for a pe- 
riod of eight years. IniS94 he bought a 
part of the old farm, comprising three 
hundred and twenty acres, and since that 
time has made many improvements upon 
the place, remodeling the old house and 
erecting a new and large barn. In addition 
to general farming, he is engaged in dealing 
and breeding in Short- horned cattle and 
Poland China hogs. In all his operations 
he has met with success, and is now num- 
bered among the most substantial farmers 
of De Kalb count)'. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leifheit are the parents 
of five children, four of whom are living — 
Ella, Hattie, William and Irvin, all of whom 
yet remain at home. Mr. Leifheit is a life- 
long Republican, and while he gives the 
party his support, he asks no favors in the 
way of local office, but gives his undivided 
attention to his farming interests. He and 
his wife are members of the German Lu- 
theran church. A life-long resident of the 
county, he has an e.xtensive acquaintance 
and is held in the highest esteem by those 
who know him. 



THOMAS HOLLAND, the present sup- 
ervisor and a substantial farmer of 
Cortland township, is well known to the 
great majority of citizens of De Kalb coun- 
ty. He was born in Richfield township, 
Fairfield county, Connecticut, April 28, 
1845, and is the son of Robert and Grace 
(Keeler) Holland, the former a native of 
Ireland, and the latter of Fairfield county, 



Connecticut. They were the parents of five 
children — Ellen, Thomas, George, Nathan 
G. and Jane E. The first and last named 
are deceased. 

Robert Holland, the father, was born in 
Fermanagh, Ireland, March 26, 181 5, and 
was the son of Thomas and Ellen (Graham) 
Holland, also natives of Ireland, and who 
passed all their lives in that land. In May, 
1839, Robert Holland came to the United 
States, landing in New York, and spending 
the first three months after his arrival at 
Poughkeepsie, New York, where he found 
employment in a brick yard. He was next 
employed by a hotel keeper in Dutchess 
county. New York, with whom he remained 
about one year, then went to the town of 
Richfield, Fairfield county, Connecticut, 
where on the 2Sth of June, 1843, he mar- 
ried Grace Keeler, a daughter of Thomas 
S. and Emily (Gilbert) Keeler. After re- 
maining in Fairfield county about fourteen 
years, in 1854 he came west and located in 
Kaneville township, Kane county, Illinois, 
where he remained some ten years, and 
then came to De Kalb county, Illinois, lo- 
cating in Cortland township. 

The subject of this sketch was nine 
years of age when he came with his parents 
to Illinois, and about twenty years old when 
they located in De Kalb county. His edu- 
cation was obtained in the schools of his 
native county, and also in the public 
schools of Kaneville township, Kane coun- 
ty, Illinois. His entire life has been passed 
on the farm, and he was required to do his 
full share of farm labor from his boyhood 
up. On the i ith of October, 1870, he was 
united in marriage with Miss Fanny A. 
Hopkins, a native of Cortland township, 
and a daughter of Cyrus B. Hopkins, and 
a sister of Hon. Albert J. Hopkins, at pres- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ent representing the eighth Illinois district 
in congress. B}' this nnion there has been 
fi\'e children, two of whom died in infancy. 
The living are Flo^d J., Ellen M. and Fan- 
nie M. 

In politics Mr. Holland is a stanch Re- 
publican, with which party he has been 
connected since attaining his niajority!^For 
nine years in succession he has served as 
supervisor of Cortland township, and is yet 
serving in the same capacity. That he has 
served his township faithfully- and well, is 
attested b}- his re-election from time to 
time. He has also served as school direc- 
tor, school trustee, and in other minor 
townsliip offices. For a number of 3 ears 
he has served his part}- a? a member of the 
county central committee, and as such has 
wielded considerable influence in that bod}-. 
Religiously he and his wife are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. He is 
the owner of eighty-six acres of highly im- 
proved land, and no man in Cortland town- 
ship holds the regard of the people in a high- 
er degree. 



MP. ANDERSON, one of the proprie- 
tors of the De Kalb Tea and Coffee 
Company, is a native of Sweden, born in 
1864. His education was obtained in the 
schools of his native land. In 1S82, when 
but eighteen years of age, he came to the 
United States, and first located in McKean 
county, Pennsylvania, where he remained 
about five \-ears, engaged in lumbering and 
where he had his first e.xperience of Ameri- 
ca's primeval forests. In 1887 he went to 
Montana, where he was engaged in the 
same business, and where he remained four 
years. ■ F'rom there he came to Illinois, and 
located at Rockford, which was his home 



until 1895, at which time he removed to the 
city of De Kalb, 

In 1S90 Mr. Anderson was united in 
marriage with Miss Ida C. Swanson, a na- 
tive of Sw-eden. B}- this union are four 
children, Mamie, Ada, .\dla and Ruth. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Anderson are members 
of the Swedish Lutheran church, and are 
actively interested in the work of that body. 

When Mr. .Anderson, with his partner, 
S. Carlson, first began business, their stock 
was confined to tea and coffee. Their trade 
grew to such proportions in a very short 
time as to necessitate a larger store room. 
This was obtained by moving farther east 
into their present commodious store build- 
ing, situated on Main street, between Si.xth 
and Seventh, and which ranks second to 
none in that section of the city. Since re- 
moving into their new quarters, they have 
not only enlarged their stock, but put in a 
greater variety, including many of the lux- 
uries and delicacies, their stock varying and 
changing with the season. A splendid 
showing is made in choice teas and coffees, 
of which they keep a superior quality. They 
are both good business men and have the 
confidence of the community in which they 
reside. 



CAPT. ANTHONY RAMER, of Hinch- 
ley, Illinois, is a well known citizen of 
De Kalb county, one who has resided here 
since 1S46. He is a native of Crawford 
county, Ohio, born March 17, 1842, and is 
the son of Henr\' L. and Susanna (Troup) 
Ramer, both of whom were natives of 
Dauphin county, Penns\'lvania, the fornier 
born xAugust 8, 1S04, and the latter Novem- 
ber 2, 1808. In 1833, they emigrated to 
Ohio, and settled in Richland county, where 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



they remained until 1846. In that year 
they came to Illinois, and first settled in Du 
Page county, where he rented a farm and 
there remained until 1849, when he came 
to De Kalb county, and purchased a farm 
of one hundred and sixty acres on section 
27, Pierce township. He built a frame 
house upon it, for which he drew the lumber 
from Du Page county. On that farm he 
spent the remainder of his life, dying in April, 
1 88 1. His first wife died in January 9, 
1877, and he later married Catherine Smith, 
who lived but five months after their mar- 
riage. When he first located in Pierce 
township, his nearest neighbor was four ■ 
miles away and there were but two or three 
residents in Pierce township. 

The subject of this sketch grew to man- 
hood in Pierce township, and had very 
limited educational advantages in the com- 
mon schools of pioneer days. On the 15th 
of January, 1863, he enlisted in Company 
C, Seventeenth Illinois Cavalry, his regi- 
ment being assigned to the Western De- 
partment, joining the army at St. Louis. 
He participated in a great many skirmishes, 
and was in the fight at Wilson Creek, where 
the Union army captured General Marma- 
duke, and seven thousand prisoners. He 
was later in the engagement near Fort 
Scott, Kansas, and for a time his regiment 
was in active pursuit of the noted guerrilla 
Ouantrell. At Black River, Arkansas, he 
was injured by being thrown from a horse, 
having two ribs broken, shoulder dislocated 
and hips fractured, being permanentl}' dis- 
abled. Some time later he was sent to Fort 
Leavenworth, and had his injuries dressed, 
and later was sent to the hospital at St. 
Joseph, Missouri. He was not discharged, 
however, until the fall of 1865, long after 
the close of the war. Enlisting as a private, 



he was promoted quartermaster of his regi- 
ment, and being made drilling master, he 
was given the honorary title of Captain. 

On receiving his discharge. Captain 
Ramer returned home, went back on the 
farm and assisted his father eight \'ears. 
He was married in Pierce township, Janu- 
ary 15, 1875, to Miss Lucinda Jane 
Shoop, a native of Pierce township and 
a daughter of Solomon Shoop, one of 
the pioneer settlers of the township. 
After marriage, he bought a farm of eighty 
acres in Pierce township, a place which was 
fairly well improved and began life for him- 
self. He remained on that place for twenty- 
five years, then sold and purchased the 
place where he now resides, near Hincklej'. 
His farm now comprises ninety-seven acres, 
the improvements on which are of a most 
substantial character. The Captain still 
suffers from the injuries received in the 
service, but notwithstanding gives personal 
attention to the cultivation of his farm. Mr. 
and Mrs. Ramer have one daughter, Alta, a 
young lady at home. 

Politically Mr. Ramer is a stanch Re- 
publican, and has voted that party ticket 
since 1864, when he cast his first presiden- 
tial ballot for Abraham Lincoln. For two 
years he served as collector in Pierce town- 
ship, constable five years and road commis- 
sioner three years. He has ever been a 
friend of education and the public schools, 
and for fourteen years served as a member 
of the school board. Since residing in 
Hinckley, he was elected and served as 
township collector of Squaw Grove town- 
ship for one year. For years he has served 
as a delegate to the various county and con- 
gressional con^'entions of his party, and 
usually in each campaign he organizes a 
campaign marching club, from sixty to 



24 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



eighty strong. The club usually attends 
all political gatherings within a reasonable 
distance. At the laying of the corner stone 
at De Kalb for the normal school building, 
he was appointed and served as marshal of 
the day. Fraternally he is a member of 
Aurora Post, No. 20, G. A. R. Few men 
are better known and none more highly re- 
spected. 



HO. GARY, superintendent of the barb 
wire, staple and field fence depart- 
ment of the American Steel Wire Gom- 
pany, De Kalb, Illinois, was born in \\'ind- 
ham, Gonnecticut, March 6, 1S50, and is 
the son of Horace H. and Gornelia E. 
(Brown) Gary, both of whom were also na- 
tives of Gonnecticut. Horace H. Gary was 
born in Scotland, Gonnecticut, August 5, 
18 19. By occupation he was a contractor 
and builder, and was a fearless abolitionist, 
a stanch Republican, and a patriotic citi- 
zen. He cast his first presidential vote for 
William Henry Harrison, and his last one 
for the grandson, Benjamin Harrison. His 
family consisted of eight children, all of 
whom grew to maturity, and six of whom 
are now living. Edgar A. is a grocer in 
Joliet, Illinois. Frederick A. is a farmer 
residing near Joliet. Frank L. is a mem- 
ber of Gompany B, Third Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, engaged in the war with Spain. 
Dwight P. is in the office of the superin- 
tendent of the Illinois Steel Gompany at 
Joliet. Oscar E. is engaged in farming 
near Joliet. One daughter is now engaged 
in teaching in the public schools of Chi- 
cago. 

Horace H. Gary was the son of Gapt. 
William Gary, born in Scotland, Gonnecti- 
cut, December 10, 17S2, and who fought 



for his country in the war of 18 12. He 
was a farmer of influence and prominence, 
but in early life he learned the carpenter's 
trade, which he carried on in connection 
with farming. Gaptain \\'illiam was the 
son of William Gary, born in Scotland, 
Gonnecticut, October 25, 1747. He was 
the son of Deacon John Gary, born in 
Scotland, Gonnecticut, April 12, 1717. 
Deacon John was the son of John Gary, 
born June 23, 1695. John was the son of 
Deacon Joseph Gary, born in Bridgewater, 
Gonnecticut, in 1663. He was a prominent 
man in Bridgewater, and a member of the 
First Congregational church in ^^'indham, 
Gonnecticut. He owned one thousand 
acres of land, which he purchased from the 
British government for ten pounds and nine 
shillings. He was buried by his townsmen 
under arms, a very unusual occurrence in 
those days. Deacon Joseph was a son of 
John Gary, who was a native of England, 
and the progenitor of the Garys in this 
country. He came from Somersetshire, 
near Bristol, England, in 1634, and joined 
the Plymouth colony in New England. 
Their coat of arms had on it the inscrip- 
tion, " Virtute e.xcerpta." 

The subject of this sketch was reared 
and educated at Dover, Bureau county, Illi- 
nois, and after he received his education he 
taught school for some time, and also as- 
sisted his father in his building and con- 
tracting. In 1873, he removed from Do- 
ver to Joliet, Illinois, where he engaged in 
the manufacture of paints and oils, which 
business he followed until 1886, when his 
health failed, which necessitated his selling 
the plant. He subsequently went to Flor- 
ida to regain his impaired health, which in 
a measure he did. It was at this time 
(1886) that I. L. Ellwood recognized in 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



25 



him one who would be an important at- 
taclic to his extensive works at De Kalb. 
Mr. Cary was therefore dul}- authorized to 
take charge of the paint department of the 
I. L. Eilwood Manufacturing Company, 
which he did with successful results. He 
was soon afterwards removed to the office, 
and finally given entire charge of the plant 
as superintendent. 

Mr. Cary was united in marriage Octo- 
ber 24, 1 87 1, with Miss Anna E. Knight, 
who was born near Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, May 18, 1852, and a daughter of 
Clayton E. and Lydia E. Knight. By this 
union five children have been born: Charles 
M., August 25, 1872; Herbert L. , June 18, 
1876; Ralph H., August, 1882; George B., 
October, 1S84; and Mabel, August, 1S87. 

Mr. Cary is well born, descending from 
one of the best families in England, and is 
a refined gentleman in the full acceptation 
of the term. His maternal grandfather 
Brown was a captain in the war of 1812. 
His great-grandfather and five of the broth- 
ers of the latter were brave and valiant 
soldiers in the Revolutionary war. Mr. 
Cary has in his possession a table which 
his great-great-grandfather built in his 
younger days, prior to the Revolution. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Cary are members of 
the Baptist church. Socially they are well 
esteemed wherever known, and have many 
warm friends in Bureau, Will and De Kalb 
counties. 



ROBERT NEWITT, who for many years 
was an active business man in De Kalb, 
Illinois, is now living a retired life. He 
was born in Oxfordshire, England, April 22, 
1822, and is the son of James and Hannah 



Newitt, both of whom were natives of the 
same country. James Newitt was a soldier 
in the British army, and haxing served his 
full time, was pensioned by the Crown. 

Robert Newitt grew to manhood in his 
native land, and received but a limited edu- 
cation in its private schools. He was twice 
married, his first union being with Miss 
Zilpah Bass, to whom was born one son, 
Robert B., who is now deceased. For his 
second wife he married Susan Rolph, De- 
cember 10, 1S46, and to them were born 
three children: Zilpah, born August 8, 1S48; 
Eliza, born April 21, 1S50; and George, 
born April 8, 1852. 

Realizing that in his native land there 
were few opportunities for the aspiring ones 
to secure what may be termed even a fair 
living, he determined to emigrate to the 
New World, and accordingly with his wife 
and family he took a sailing \-essel, and in 
April, 1854, landed at New York, from 
which place he came directly to De I\alb, 
Illinois, and engaged in the boot and shoe 
trade, in which he continued for forty-three 
years. As may well be imagined, the coun- 
try at that time was comparatively new, 
with no such evidence of thrift as is now 
shown by the manufactories of the city. 
He grew up with the country and tov.'n, and 
what he has accumulated is the result of 
close application to business, strict economy 
and fair dealing with his fellow men. 

In politics Mr. Newitt is a Republican, 
and has served his town in various offices, 
both previous and subsequent to its incor- 
poration. It goes without saying that in 
ever position occupied, he discharged its 
duties faithfully and well, with the same 
conscientious regard for right that char- 
acterized him in his private business In 
1S97, when he sold his mercantile establish- 



Q&IIK VAtlFY CX>11K;F 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



nient, he visited his native land, where he 
enjoyed the associations of former years. 
The old world, however, had not the at- 
tractions of the new, and he returned to the 
scenes of his active life, where he is now 
living retired, spending his time in looking 
after his city property, now owning several 
houses and vacant lots. As a citizen he is 
regarded highly, and has always been pro- 
gressive, with an eye single to the best in- 
terests of his adopted city and county. 



ISAAC LEONARD ELLWOOD.— The 
1 life history of him whose name heads 
this sketch is closely identified with the 
history of De Kalb, which has been his 
home for forty-three years. He began his 
remarkable career here when .the city was 
a little village. He has grown with its 
growth, and has been largely instrumental 
in its development. His life has been one 
of untiring activity, and jias been crowned 
with a degree of success attained by com- 
paratively few men., 

A native of New York, Isaac L. Ell- 
wood was born in Salt Springville, Mont- 
gomery county, August 3, 1833, and is the 
seventh son in the family of Abraham and 
Sarah (Belong) Ellwood. In early youth 
he began to earn his own livelihood. He 
was fitted for the responsible duties of life 
only by a limited common-school educa- 
tion, but his force of character, unflagging 
energy and perseverance made up for his 
lack of early opportunities. Driving a team 
on the Erie canal at ten dollars per month, 
and later clerking in a store until eighteen 
years of age, thus his youth was passed. 
The disco\-ery of gold on the Pacific slope, 
however, brought a change in his life, for. 



with the hope of more quickly realizing a 
fortune, he made his way to California in 
185 1 and spent four years in that state. 
He worked in the mines for a year, and 
then secured a position as salesman in a 
Sacramento store. By industry and econ- 
om}' he managed to secure a small capital, 
but not wishing to invest this in the far 
west he retraced his steps to Illinois, and 
.established a little hardware store in De 
Kalb in 1855. His history from that time 
forward is one of interest, showing, as it 
does, that there is no royal road to wealth, 
but that industry and a fit utilization of his 
opportunities has brought him to the goal 
toward which all business men are eagerly 
wending their way. For twenty years he 
carried on his store, increasing his stock as 
his patronage justified. 

His travels through Illinois as an auc- 
tioneer, and his contact with farmers, 
brought to his knowledge a condition of 
affairs which in later years he was able to 
improve. Illinois' broad prairies offered 
special inducements to the agriculturists, 
but they had great difficulty in securing 
fences which would indicate the boundaries 
of their land and prevent cattle from de- 
stroying the crops. As there were no for- 
ests lumber was very e.xpensive, and then, 
too, the board fences were being continu- 
ally broken down and in need of repair. 
J. F. Glidden invented what is to-day 
known as the Glidden barb wire and Mr. 
EU^ood assisted him in obtaining patents, 
having a half interest in the invention. In 
1876 Mr. Glidden sold his interest to the 
Washburn & Moen Manufacturing Com- 
pany, and they together, after a litigation 
of some years, granted licenses to \'arious 
factories. Through Mr. Ellwood's influence 
and foresight, all of the underlying and first 




ISAAC L. ELLWOOD. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



29 



patents on barb wire and machinery for 
making the same were combined together, 
enabhng him, with the assistance of others, 
to build up one of the largest and most suc- 
cessful business enterprises in the history 
of the country. For forty years farming 
was carried on in this section of the United 
States with the same need of fencing mate- 
rial, yet not until the year mentioned did 
any one take advantage of the opportunity 
to give the world this important invention. 
For a time Mr. Elhvood was associated in 
the manufacture of barb wire v.-ith Mr. 
Glidden and afterward with the Washburn 
& Moen Manufacturing Company, of Wor- 
cester, Massachusetts. This connection 
continued for some time, but Mr. Elhvood 
is now exclusive owner and manager of the 
large manufacturing establishment at De 
Kalb, doing business under the firm name 
of the I. L. Ellvvood Manufacturing Com- 
pany. When he was associated with Mr. 
Glidden he was placed in charge of the 
business management of the firm, and to 
his tact and business ability may be attrib- 
uted in no small measure the success of the 
enterprise. 

From time to time improvements have 
of course been made. Countless objections 
were urged against the new fencing ma- 
terial, but this was to be expected, for no 
successful invention ever came at once into 
general use. Its utility, however, was soon 
demonstrated, and the sales increased rap- 
idly after a time. The fencing began to be 
used not only by the farmers but also by 
the railroad companies; and although the 
railroad corporations were loath at first to 
accept the invention, they have to-day thou- 
sands of miles of road enclosed with barb- 
wire fence. In order to turn out his ma- 
terial at a lower cost, it was seen that it 



would be necessary to have automatic ma- 
chinery, which was secured through the 
efforts of Mr. Elhvood. This machine was 
made for the purpose of taking the raw wire 
from the coil, barb, twist and spool it ready 
for use; and in perfecting this invention 
over one million dollars were spent, but the 
result was at length attained, and one ma- 
chine was able to do the work of eight men 
and do it more perfectly. The works of 
the I. L. Elhvood Manufacturing Company 
are very extensive, the capacity being about 
twenty-five car loads every ten hours, and 
in this establishment employment is fur- 
nished to about six hundred men. It is 
now consolidated with the American Steel 
& Wire Company. While others are also 
engaged in the manufacture of barbed wire, 
it is a widely recognized fact throughout the 
country that this industry owes its success- 
ful establishment to Mr. Elhvood. 

On the 27th of January, 1859, Mr. Ell- 
wood married Miss Harriet Miller, and they 
became the parents of four sons and three 
daughters, but two of the sons are now de- 
ceased. Those living are William L. , Mrs. 
Dr. Mayo, Mrs. J. H. Lewis, Mrs. B. F. 
Ray and E. P. Elhvood. 

Although a stanch Republican in his po- 
litical views, Mr. Elhvood has always de- 
clined to accept political office, save that 
of alderman of his adopted city, in which 
capacity he served his fellow townsmen for 
a time. He has always taken great inter- 
est in the promulgation of the principles of 
the party, and in the annual meetings of 
its representative men in Illinois he is 
always invited and his advice is listened to 
with interest, and his views meet with gen- 
eral acceptance. While refusing office, he 
was, however, appointed upon the staff of 
Governor Tanner, with the rank of colonel, 



30 



THE BIOGR.\PHICAL RECORD. 



and is now serving in that position. There 
is no more progressive or pubhc-spirited 
citizen in De Kalb county, and he with- 
holds his support from no movement or en- 
terprise tending to advance the public good. 
In securing for De Kalb the Northern Illi- 
nois State Normal, Colonel Ellwood gave 
much time and attention, spending weeks 
at the state capitol, using his influence with 
legislators in securing the passage of the 
bill creating the institution, and its location 
at De Kalb. In 1896, a bill was passed 
by the general assembly of the state, ap- 
propriating seventy-five thousand dollars to 
the buildings, and in 1898, one appropria- 
ing fifty thousand dollars. In addition to 
this the city of De Kalb gave seventy thou- 
sand dollars. By the governor he was ap- 
pointed a trustee of the school, and is now 
serving as such. \\'hil» others were work- 
ing for the same object, it is due him the 
greater share of credit for securing such a 
noble institution. 

Colonel Ellwood is a charitable and be- 
nevolent man, one of broad humanitarian 
principles, who regards not lightly his duty 
to his fellow men. He has climbed steadily 
upwards, and all the time he has had a 
hand reaching down to assist others less 
fortunate. Always ready to encourage in- 
dustry and energy, his employees know that 
faithful service means promotions as oppor- 
tunity offers. He has won for himself very 
favorable comment for the careful and sys- 
tematic methods he has followed in business. 
He realized the intrinsic value of minor as 
well as greater opportunities, has ever stood 
ready to take advantage of circumstances, 
and even mold adverse conditions until 
they serve his ends, and in all relations has 
maintained an unassailable reputation for 
integrity and honor. 



GEORGE G. LEWIS, a teacher of 
music in Sycamore, Illinois. He was 
born in the village of Cortland, De Kalb 
county, Illinois, June 30, 1864. His father. 
Dr. George W. Lewis, was born in Albion, 
Orleans county. New York, in 1832. He 
'read medicine in Cincinnati, and latter at- 
tended the Miami Medical College. About 
1853 he came west, locating in Galena, Illi- 
nois, from which place he moved to Cort- 
land in 1856. He was a great student and 
investigator, and gave much time to private 
research. In his profession he was not 
bigoted, but adopted successful methods 
from every school of medicine. A method- 
ical man, he kept a diary from the time he 
was si.x years old until his death in 1895, 
in the Wesleyan hospital at Chicago, where 
he was being treated. For several j-ears 
prior to his death he made his home with 
our subject. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, 
George Lewis, who married a Miss Ferry, 
was a farmer by occupation, and lived many 
years near Flint, Michigan, where he died 
at a good old age. The maternal grand- 
father, Littlefield, attained the age of one 
hundred and three 3-ears, and at that age 
performed on a violincello, on which instru- 
ment he was a fine musician. He was with 
General Washington at Valley Forge and 
acted as one of his body guards. 

Dr. George W. Lewis married Miss Julia 
Teachout, born in Royalton, Ohio, near 
Cleveland in 1833, and who died in De- 
Kalb county, in 1892. She was the daugh- 
ter of John and Lydia (Throop) Teachout, 
the former a native of New Amsterdam, 
New York, who was an old-fashion herb 
doctor, and an expert in the use of nature's 
remedies. Many of his formulas have since 
been used by practicing physicans. The 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Throop family were early settlers of Chi- 
cago, locating there when the place was 
more than a village. Throop street was 
named in honor of one of the family. John 
Teachout was a son of John Teachout, 
senior, who in early colonial days took up a 
tract of land where New Amsterdam, New 
York, now staiads. 

With the exception of a short time in 
Cincinnati, while an infant, and two years 
when his parents resided in Michigan, our 
subject lived in Cortland, until the age of 
si.\teen. He attended the public schools of 
Cortland, until that age, after which he 
went to Evanston, where he took a course 
in the Northwestern University, and later 
one at Oberlin, Ohio. At the age of sev- 
enteen he began the teaching of music, 
having made a study of it for several years. 
He later attended the Cincinnati College 
of Music, perfecting himself in his profes- 
sion. He also took private lessons under 
the best musicians in Chicago. For a 
number of years he traveled through many 
of the states in the union, teaching on the 
way. He has made five or six trips to 
California and Oregon, and traveled all 
along the Pacific coast. In 1889, he came 
to Sycamore, taking charge of the musical 
department of Waterman Hall. 

George G. Lewis was married in Dixon, 
Illinois, August i, 1888, to Miss Harriet C. 
Chapell, a native of South Grove township, 
De Kalb county, Illinois, and a daughter of 
Enoch and Sarah (Winchell) Chapell. By 
this union there is one child, Gertrude, a 
bright little miss of two years. Mr. Lewis 
is of an inventive turn of mind, and among 
other inventions is an appliance for turning 
music with foot while both hands are play- 
ing; also an appliance for watering poultry, 
by which the water is kept fresh and clean. 



The most important invention, however, is a 
machine for re-insulating electric wires that 
have become weatherworn, without remov- 
ing from the poles. With his partner, 
William A. Buehl, he is now making practi- 
cal use of the invention. Politically the Pro- 
fessor is a Republican, and fraternally a Ma- 
son, holding membership with the blue lodge 
and chapter at Sycamore. 



EDWARD I. BOIES, of the firm of Van 
Galder & Boies, publishers of the True 
Republican, Sycamore, Illinois, is a native 
of the city, born February 19, i860, and is 
the son of Henry L. and Harriet S. (Holmes) 
Boies, the former a native of South Hadley, 
Massachusetts, born July 5, 1830, and the 
latter a native of Sherburne, New York, and 
the daughter of Alexander and Margaret 
(Rumrill) Holmes. They were married at 
Springfield, Massachusetts, February 9, 
1858, and became the parents of three chil- 
dren — Edward I., our subject; Charles Ar- 
temas, who is engaged in the practice of law 
at DeKalb, Illinois; and Lucy M., who was 
born in Sycamore, Illinois, February, 1865. 
She received her early education in the 
Sycamore schools, graduating from the high 
school at the age of sixteen years. She 
taught school in the country for a few terms, 
then attended Oberlin College. She after- 
wards was employed as teacher in Syca- 
more schools. In 1888 she went on a pleas- 
ure trip to the Bahama islands. The winter 
of 1891-92 she spent in study and travel in 
Europe. In June of the latter year she re- 
turned home where she remained until the 
fall of last year when, upon the advice of 
physicians, she went to California. In spite 
of the most assiduous care and attention of 
her devoted mother, and the efforts of the 



32 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



best medical talent, she continued to grow 
weaker until death ended her suffering Fri- 
day, August 9, 1895, at Passadena. 

The paternal grandfather of our sub- 
ject, Artemas Boies, was born in Blandford, 
Massachusetts, in 1792. He was a minis- 
ter in the Congregational church, and after 
a useful life of fifty-three years, died Sept- 
ember 20, 1845. The family are of French 
origin, and were among the Huguenots who 
were driven from their native land into 
Scotland, and who came to this country 
about 1680. Henry L. Boies grew to man- 
hood in his native state, and in 1S54 came 
DeKalb county, Illinois, and engaged in 
agricultural pursuits in South Grove town- 
ship. In 1858 he located at Sycamore, 
where he purchased a small farm, which was 
afterwards surveyed and platted, and is 
known as Boies' Subdivision of Sycamore. 
He later became associated in the publica- 
tion of the True Republican, and in 1865, 
its editorial management passed into his 
hands. He continued with the paper as 
editor and publisher up to the time of his 
death, April 26, 1887. His widow is still 
living in Sycamore, where she is well known 
and highly respected, being an active mem- 
ber of the Congregational church. 

In politics Henry L. Boies was a stanch 
Republican from the organization of the 
party. During the administration of Pres- 
ident Hayes, he served as postmaster of 
Sycamore, and in i S70, was secretary of the 
Illinois state senate. He was very active 
and prominent in politics and an earnest 
worker for the party, ever read}- to aid his 
friends. During his life in Sycamore, he 
was a prominent member of the Congrega- 
tional church and did much to strengthen 
that organization and build up the Master's 
cause. He was a man of literary tastes, 



and gave much attention to that kind of 
work. Among his literary productions was 
Boies' History of DeKalb County, published 
in 1868, a work of considerable merit, with 
much practical and statistical information. 

The subject of this sketch was reared in 
Sycamore, receiving his education in its 
public schools, and at Todd's Seminary, 
Woodstock, Illinois. Later he attended 
the business college at Jacksonville, Illi- 
nois, in which he received a good busi- 
ness training. In 18S0 he entered the 
office of the True Republican as a print- 
er and reporter, and in 1885 became a 
partner with his father in the publication of 
the paper. This partnership was continued 
until the death of the father, after which he 
carried on the paper alone for about one 
year, and then associated with himself F. 
O. Van Galder, and under the firm name 
of Van Galder & Boies, the publication of 
the paper has since been continued. 

The True Republican was founded in 
1S57, and has always been an advocate of 
the principles of the Republican party. It 
was published as a weekly until 1868, when 
it was made a semi-weekly, since which 
time it has been issued regularly every 
Wednesday and Saturday. The paper has 
a large circulation and is in a prosperous 
condition. While it makes party politics 
one of its principal issues, yet it devotes 
more attention to local affairs, having its 
correspondents in almost every town and 
township in the county. In connection 
with the paper, the proprietors have a good 
job printing office, from which they turn 
out first-class work. 

In 1883 Mr. Boies was bill clerk for the 
state senate, and again in 1885, serving in 
a most acceptable manner. In 1S84 he 
took a vacation from newspaper work, and 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



33 



went to the Dakotas and took up a quarter- 
section of government land, remaining 
there about one year, in order that he 
might prove up his claim. On returning 
home he settled down to his work, in which 
he has continued to the present time. He 
is now serving as alderman of the second 
ward, being elected in 1S97. In all mat- 
ters pertaining to the public welfare, Mr. 
Boies takes an especially active interest, 
rendering all the aid in his power, person- 
ally and through the paper with which he 
is connected. 



JOHN MULLIXS resides on section 18, 
J Shabbona township, where he owns and 
operates a farm of two hundred and forty 
acres, while owning another farm of one 
hundred and fifty-four acres in the same 
township, both being highly improved 
places. He is a native of Yorkshire, Eng- 
land, born October 4, 1844, and is the son 
of Robert Mullins, also a native of England, 
born in 181 1, and who grew to manhood 
and there married Sarah Ulyett, who was 
born in Yorkshire. By occupation Robert 
Mullins was a farmer in Yorkshire, and was 
engaged in agricultural pursuits in that 
shire for some years. In 1852 he emigrated 
to the United States, taking passage on a 
steamer, the Sarah Sands, an English ves- 
sel, and was fifteen days in crossing the At- 
lantic. Landing at New York, he came 
directly west to Buffalo, by rail, and then 
by boat on the lakes to Chicago, and from 
Chicago to Aurora, by rail, that being as far 
west as the railroads then extended. From 
Aurora he came with teams to Shabbona, 
where he joined some English friends who 
had located there the previous year. Rob- 
ert Mullins purchased one hundred and si.xty 



acres on section 17, erected a small house 
and at once commenced to improve his 
farm. He later bought one hundred and 
sixty acres, and from time to time made 
other purchases of land until he owned over 
five hundred acres of the most productive 
land in Shabbona township. He continued 
to reside upon his farm until his death, in 
February, 1886, at the age of seventy-five 
years. He was twice married, his first wife 
dying in 1858, when he subsequently mar- 
ried an English lady, who survives him, and 
now resides near Manchester, England. He 
was the father of six sons and one daughter 
who grew to mature years. Mary, the eld- 
est born, is now the wife of Septimus Story, 
of whom mention is made elsewhere in this 
work. George is a substantial farmer of 
Willow Creek township, Lee county. John 
is the subject of this review. Robert is a 
farmer residing in Wright county, Iowa. 
William and Henry also reside in Iowa. 
Thomas resides south of Chicago. 

John Mullins came to the United States 
when a lad of eight years, and in opening 
up and developing the home farm he ren- 
dered what assistance he could. He had 
but limited school advantages in early life, 
but is now a well informed man. He en- 
listed, August 13, 1862, in Company E, One 
Hundred and Fifth Illinois Volunteer Infan- 
try, under Colonel Dustin,the regiment being 
assigned to the Army of the Cumberland. 
He participated in the battles of Resaca, 
Burnt Hickory, Kenesaw Mountain, Mariet- 
ta, Georgia, and Peach Tree Creek. In the 
latter engagement he received a gunshot 
wound in the left arm, which permanently 
disabled him, the arm being broken. He 
still carries the lead, which was never ex- 
tracted. After being in the hospital for a 
time, in October, 1864, he received a fur- 



34 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



lough and came home. While here he cast 
his first presidential ballot for Abraham 
Lincoln. In the winter following he re- 
joined his regiment at Blackville, South 
Carolina, and was later in a few skirmishes. 
He was at Raleigh, North Carolina, where 
Johnson surrendered to Sherman. Later 
he participated in the grand review at Wash- 
ington, and was there discharged June 17, 
1865, and was paid off at Camp Fr}', Chi- 
cago, about two weeks later. 

Returning home, he went to work on 
the farm, and remained with his father 
until 1S69, when, in Shabbona township, 
October 12, he was united in marriage with 
Miss Martha R. Nicholson, a native of 
Ohio, but of English parentage. Her fa- 
ther. Rev. William Nicholson, a minister 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, removed 
from Ohio to Indiana, and later to Illinois, 
where Mrs. Mullins was mostly reared and 
educated. By this union were six children, 
five daughters and one son. Clara is the 
wife of Henry Longford, a, farmer of Lee 
county. Anna is the wife of Thomas Fair- 
cloth, a farmer of Shabbona township. 
Gertrude, Cora, Grace and Elmer Howard 
reside at home. 

Immediately after marriage, Mr. and 
Mrs. Mullins commenced their domestic life 
on the southeast corner of the farm on 
which they now reside. Mr. Mullins first 
purchased fifty acres, and later one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of his father, compris- 
ing the home place, and there resided for 
some years. In 1S92, he built on section 
18 the house in which they now live. No 
farm in the township shows better improve- 
ment, and Mr. Mullins has the reputation 
of being a No. i farmer. Politically he is a 
stanch Republican, and has served three 
consecutive terms as one of the highway 



commissioners. He and his wife are mem- 
bers of the West Shabbona Methodist Epis- 
copal church, of which he is trustee and 
steward. He has been connected with the 
Sunday school and has been its superin- 
tendent for nearly a quarter of a century. 
Fraternally he is a Mason, a member of 
Shabbona Lodge, and is also an Ancient 
Odd Fellow. His long-continued residence 
in De Kalb county has made for him many 
warm friends. 



PHILO FERNANDO SLATER is the 
owner of a fine farm of one hundred 
and sixty-seven acres, a part of which lies 
within the village limits of Hinckley. He 
was born in Sugar Grove, Kane county, 
Illinois, July 24, 1S53, and came to De 
Kalb county with his father, Philo Slater, 
in 1S54. Philo Slater was a native of New 
York, born in Tompkins county, in 1824, 
while his grandfather, Thomas Slater, was 
a native of Connecticut. The family are 
of English descent, the first of the name 
locating in Connecticut at a very early day. 
Thomas Slater was a soldier in the war of 
1812, and was an officer of the state militia. 
From Connecticut he moved to Tompkins 
county. New York, and in 18^7 came to 
Illinois, and located in Sugar Grove town- 
ship, Kane county, where he engaged in 
farming. Philo Slater at that time was 
only thirteen years of age. He there grew 
to manhood and married Sallie Nichols, a 
native of Chenango county. New York, and 
a daughter of Cyrus C. Nichols, who was 
an early settler of Kane count}-. After his 
marriage, Philo Slater engaged in farming 
for five years in Kane count}-, and in 1854 
came to De Kalb county, and purchased a 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres, adjoin- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



35 



ing the present village of Hinckley, a par- 
tially improved place. Later he purchased 
one hundred and seventy-three acres adjoin- 
ing, making the home farm comprise three 
hundred and thirty-three acres, in addition to 
which he became the owner of two small 
farms near Hinckley. He was recognized 
as one of the most enterprising and practical 
farmers of De Kalb county. Politically, he 
was a Republican from the organization of 
the party, having in 1856 voted for John C. 
Fremont, its first presidential candidate. 
He took an active part in local politics, and 
for years served as supervisor of Squaw 
Grove township, and also held other offices 
of honor and trust. He was a man of good 
habits, and a strong temperance man. He 
died on his home farm, March 28, 1894. 
He was twice married, his first wife dying 
in 1884, and he later married Miss Maria 
Severance, who still survives him. By his 
first wife, he was the father of the following 
named children: Cyrus, a farmer of Squaw 
Grove township; Mary S. , wife af Albert 
G. White, of Idaho; Philo P., the subject 
of this sketch; Sarah, who grew to woman- 
hood and died single at the age of twenty- 
one years; and Eva, wife of Elmer Benton, 
who resides in Hinsdale, Illinois. 

The subject of this sketch grew to man- 
hood on the home farm, and received a 
good common-school education. He was 
married June 4, 1879, to Miss Alice J. 
Sebree, a daughter of W. M. Sebree, whose 
sketch appears elsewhere in this volume. 
By this union there are two children, Roy 
M. and Elva E. After marriage he located 
on a part of the old place, which he culti- 
vated for several years. After his father's 
death he and his brother, Cyrus, bought 
out the heirs, and succeeded to the old 
homestead, which they divided equally be- 



tween them. Since coming into possession 
of the place he has greatly improved it, and 
has now one of the most valuable farms in 
Squaw Grove township. 

In connection with his farming Mr. 
Slater has been engaged for some years in 
the sheep business, and has the largest flock 
of recorded pure-blood Shropshire sheep in 
De Kalb county. His flock now consists of 
about one hundred and fifty head. His 
reputation as a breeder and dealer in these 
sheep extends throughout the whole coun- 
try. Politically he is a thoroughbred Re- 
publican, casting his first presidential ballot 
for R. B. Hayes in 1876. He has taken an 
active pari in local politics, and has served 
on the county central committee for several 
years, and has been chairman of the town- 
ship committee. As a delegate he has 
attended various conventions of his party, 
and has always e.xerted a good influence. 
He and his wife attend the Methodist 
Episcopal church at Hinckley, and frater- 
nally he is a member of the Modern Wood- 
men of America. 



ROBERT DUFFEY is a retired farmer 
residing in the city of De Kalb, where 
he is now enjoying the fruits of a life of 
toil. He was born in Coshocton county, 
Ohio, in 1830, and is the son of James and 
Belle Duffey, the former being a prosperous 
farmer of Coshocton county. In 1844, 
accompanied by his family, James Duffey 
came to De Kalb county, Illinois, and pur- 
chased one hundred and sixty acres of land 
in De Kalb township, which he placed un- 
der a high state of cultivation, and which 
was his home during the remainder of his 
life. After a somewhat uneventful but use- 
ful life, his death occurred in 1872. He 



36 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



was highly respected as a citizen, beloved 
as a husband and honored as a father. 

Robert is the second son in a family of 
eight children, and was fourteen years of 
age when with his father he removed to 
De Kalb county, Illinois. He lived with 
his father, assisting in the cultivation of the 
farm, and attending the district schools as 
opportunity offered him, until he reached his 
majority, when he was employed by J. M. 
Goodell, who was then engaged in mer- 
cantile business at De Kalb. He remained 
with Air. Goodell two years, and then pur- 
chased a threshing machine, which he run 
for several years in connection with farm- 
ing. In 1855 he removed to Storey 
county, Iowa, where he purchased a farm 
of one hundred and seventj^-two acres, 
and there remained engaged in its cultiva- 
tion for two years. Returning to DeKalb 
county, he remained here two years, en- 
gaged in farming, after which he removed to 
California, in 1859. He had a similar ex- 
perience to all other gold seekers, who took 
the overland route by ox teams to the New 
Eldorado. In California he engaged in 
handling and hauling freight, using horses 
and mules as locomotive power. He there 
remained five years, meeting with fair suc- 
cess. 

After his return to De Kalb, in 1864, Mr. 
Duffey engaged in the livery business, which 
he followed for four years. He then pur- 
chased eighty acres of land which he im- 
proved, and sold at an advance in price. 
He next speculated in city property, which 
has grown on his hands to a phenomenal 
extent. At present he is living a retired 
life, as the result of former activity and 
push. 

On the twentieth of February, 1865, 
Mr. Duffev was united in marriage with 



Miss Ellen M. Fox, daughter of P. L. Fox, 
and by this union were born se\-en children, 
six of whom are living, and who have each 
received a good education. 

In politics Mr. Duffey is a Democrat, 
and was honored by his fellow-citizens with 
various town offices, including road com- 
missioner, which office he held for three 
years, and was trustee for nine years. He 
is highly respected in the city of De Kalb, 
of which he is a loyal and patriotic citizen. 



DANIEL PIERCE. — Success in any line 
of occupation, in any avenue of busi- 
ness, is not a matter of spontaneity, but is a 
legitimate offspring of the proper use of the 
means at hand, the improvement of oppor- 
tunity, and the exercise of the highest func- 
tions made possible in any case. Young 
men in the past have often been deterred 
from devoting themselves to a business life 
because of the widespread impression that 
such a life yields no opportunity for the dis- 
play of genius. The time, however, has 
gone by when, other things being equal, the 
business man must take a secondary place 
to the lawyer, the doctor, the minister or 
the editor. In fact, as a rule, let the busi- 
ness man be equally well-equipped by edu- 
cation and natural endowment, and you will 
find him to-day in every community, exert- 
ing a wider influence and wielding a larger 
power than a man of equal capacity in other 
walks of life. The men of affairs have 
come to be in a large degree the men upon 
whom the country leans. The subject of 
this sketch is pre-eminently a man of affairs. 
Daniel Pierce was born in the town of 
Neversink, Sullivan county, New York, July 
18, 1S14, and is the son of Joseph and 
Elizabeth (Cargill) Pierce. His father was 




DANIEL PIERCE. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



39 



a native of Westchester county, New York, 
and when fifteen years of age went to SulH- 
van county, where his marriage with EHza- 
beth Cargill was solemnized. They became 
the parents of six children — William, Polly, 
John, Daniel, Penelope and Catherine. He 
died in March, 1819, at the age of thirty- 
one years, and his widow, three years later, 
married Edward Porter. 

When our subject was but twelve years 
of age, he commenced life for himself, work- 
ing for three dollars per month for the first 
seven months. His education was very 
limited, for the reason that he was thrown 
upon his own resources at such a tender 
age. But there was in him the making of 
a man. He toiled early and late, working 
for others until he attained his majority, 
when he began working a farm on his own 
account. He worked during the summers, 
and in the winters worked for his board 
while going to school. He was married De- 
cember 17, 1835, to Miss Phebe J. Brund- 
age, a native of Orange county. New York, 
born August 17, 1818, and a daughter of 
Abijah and Sarah (Lane) Brundage. Her 
father, who was born April 23, 1781, was 
by occupation a farmer, and during the war 
of 181 2 served as a soldier. He died in 
Sullivan county, April 23, 1850. His wife 
was born September 23, 1786, and died Oc- 
tober 21, 1S37. Abijah Brundage was the 
son of John and Martha (Ogden) Brundage, 
the former born February 12, 1733, and 
died February 9, 1796. The latter born 
December 10, 1738, died October 28, 1799. 
To our subject and wife three children were 
born, the first dying in infancy. Eleanor is 
now the widow of A. W. Townsend. Sarah 
married G. P. Wild, cashier of the banking 
house of Daniel Pierce & Company. She 
died June 11, 1896. Mrs. Pierce died Oc- 



tober 4, 1876, leaving many friends to mourn 
her loss. 

Alter his marriage, Mr. Pierce operated 
the old homestead for four years, and then 
purchased the lease of a farm in a different 
locality, which he operated five years, and 
upon a third farm he remained until 1848, 
when he purchased the titles of three farms 
in Sullivan county. New York, including the 
old homestead. From there he removed 
to Deming, Ulster county. New York, and 
purchased an interest in a tannery where 
he remained two years. The desire was 
in him, however, to increase his worldly 
possessions more rapidly than he could in 
the east, and he therefore determined on 
coming to Illinois, where the opportunities 
for advancement were much greater. Ac- 
cordingly, in 1855, he sold the greater 
part of his possessions in his native county, 
and came to De Kalb county, where he 
rented a farm in Mayfield township for 
one year. In 1856, he removed to the city 
of Sycamore and engaged in the real estate 
business, buying and selling both improved 
and unimproved farms. He continued in 
that business exclusively until 1S67, when 
the banking house of Pierce, Dean & Com- 
pany was established, of which he took the 
active management. The firm name was 
changed in 1871, to Pierce & Dean, and in 
1883 to Daniel Pierce & Company. Until 
1888 Mr. Pierce had the active manage- 
ment of his bank, but on account of im- 
paired health, he is now practically living a 
retired life. During the past ten years he 
has devoted his time principally to his Iowa 
interests. 

For more than forty years Mr. Pierce 
has ranked among the ablest financiers of 
northern Illinois. Successful beyond even 
his own highest e.xpectations, he has added 



40 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



to his possessions until he is the owner of 
many large and producti\e farms in De 
Kalb county, and several thousand acres in 
Iowa and other western states. The bank- 
ing house so long managed by him has al- 
ways been regarded as one of the safest 
financial institutions in the state, and this 
confidence in the soundness of the bank has 
been brought about by his well-known con- 
servative character and strict integrity. 
While as stated, his early education was 
limited, yet by reading and observation he 
became well informed, and his judgment of 
men and affairs, especially as affecting finan- 
cial interests, has been almost infallible. 
He always knew when to buy and when to 
sell a piece of real estate, and the fluctua- 
tions in the money market were generally 
foreseen by him. His word was always 
kept inviolate and a promise made by him 
was fulfilled to the letter. 



PROF. FREDERICK BRINK BETTIS 
is a musician whose skill and ability is 
acknowledged by all. Since 1893 he has 
made his home in Sycamore, but has classes 
in music in many of the surrounding towns. 
He was born in Lacon, Marshall county, 
Illinois, December 5, 1S53, and is the son 
of John W. and Sarah A. (Brink) Bettis, 
the former a native of Montreal, Canada, 
and the latter born at Saugerties, on the 
Hudson, opposite the old Robert Livingston 
manor. They were the parents of seven 
sons and three daughters, of whom three 
sons and one daughter survi\'e. Two of 
the sons served during the war of the 
rebellion. By trade the father was an 
architect and builder, and for some years 
resided in Kingston, New York, from which 
place he moved to Lacon, Illinois, in the 



early fifties. In that place he engaged in 
the lumber business, and also had a large 
farm near the city, on which he resided. 
His wife dying in 1856, he later went to 
California, where he remained seventeen 
years, then returned to the residence of a 
son in Kansas, where his death occurred in 
1 888. His father, the grandfather of our 
subject, was one of the Revolutionary heroes. 
The mother of our subject dying when 
he was three years of age, he went to live 
with relatives, but being of an independent 
turn of mind, at the age of ten years he 
began supporting himself. He attended 
school until the age of fifteen, working on 
farms during the summer months for his 
board and clothes, and part of the time for 
the opportunity of attending school. At 
the age of fifteen he commenced to learn 
the painters' trade, and during the time 
thus employed was studying music, which 
he intended to make his profession. After 
ten years he began the study of vocal music 
with C. E. Leslie, a well-known Chicago 
author and teacher of music, and with him 
traveled for ten years, over nearly a score of 
states, singing at conventions and musical 
gatherings. He traveled eight months in 
the 3'ear, and during the remainder of the 
time he perfected himself in his chosen 
profession. He spent several seasons in 
the New England Conservatory of Music, 
in Boston, and took private lessons there at 
Professor H. E. Holt's Normal School for 
Trained Teachers, for public-school work. 
In 1888 he went to St. Joseph, Missouri, 
and there remained two j-ears, engaged in 
teaching music in its public schools. In 
1890 he moved to Chicago, and taught 
music in the schools of South Evanston. 
While residing there he frequently came to 
Sycamore to give lessons to the pupils in 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the public schools, and in 1893 he took up 
his residence in this city. He gives special 
attention to vocal culture and harmon}', 
and has private pupils in Creston, Malta, 
Genoa, Kingston and other places. He 
takes great interest in musical conventions, 
and often reads papers before them on 
musical topics. 

Professor Bettis was married in Austin, 
a suburb of Chicago, December 27, 1890, 
to Miss Blanche Bentley, born in Chagrin 
Falls, Ohio, and a daughter of Martin 
Bentley, a native of Warren, Ohio, who 
moved to Boone county, Illinois, and was 
one of the forty-niners of California, where 
he engaged in farming a number of years. 
With two. companions, he engaged a man 
to take them across the plains in a wagon, 
each of them paying one hundred dollars in 
advance. At Omaha the man deserted 
them, and all three walked across the 
plains and mountains to the land of gold. 
Returning later to Ohio, he remained a 
short time, and then removed to Austin, 
Illinois, where he died. 

In politics Professor Bettis is a stanch 
Republican, although he gives little atten- 
tion to political affairs. Fraternally he is a 
Mason, holding membership with the blue 
lodge at Sycamore. 



GEORGE D. BENTLY, dealer in real 
estate and loans, De Kalb, Illinois, 
was born in Poughkeepsie, Duchess county. 
New York, in 1825. He is the son of John 
and Cornelia Bently. John Bently was a 
shoemaker, but in middle life gave up the 
trade to follow agricultural pursuits. In 
1834 he removed to the city of Auburn, 
New York, where he passed away at the 
advanced age of ninety- four years. 



George D. Bently, the subject of this 
sketch, emigrated to Illinois in 1854, locat- 
ing in De Kalb, De Kalb county, on the 
same place where he now resides. In his 
early life in De Kalb he was busily en- 
gaged in the grain, lumber and coal busi- 
ness, at which he continued for thirteen 
years. At the e.xpiration of that time he 
began to deal in real estate and loans, and 
little by little worked himself into the busi- 
ness. 

In 1 8 54 Mr. Bently was married to Miss 
Ada E. Brown, daughter of F. W. Brown, 
by whom he had six children, four of whom 
are now living. Frank W. is a conductor 
on the Northwestern Railroad, and has been 
employed by that road for the past twenty 
years. Chester is secretary of the Cripple 
Creek Mining Company. Fred is foreman 
for the Omaha Packing Company. Jesse is 
yardmaster at Tracy. Mrs. Ada E. Bently 
died in 1S70, and he married for his second 
wife Miss Jennie Streubly, in 1878. ' To 
this union have been born two children, 
George D. and Ada E. The latter is pos- 
sessed of more than ordinary intelligence, a 
fine musician and an accomplished elocu- 
tionist. 

Mr. Bently has never, strange to relate, 
advertised, nor does he have an office; 
when his patrons want land or money, they 
find him without difficulty. While he is 
getting along in years, Mr. Bently is not 
above doing a day's work that any other 
laboring man can accomplish. By his in- 
dustrial habits and his close application to 
the golden rule, he has accumulated a nice 
fortune. He owns several houses in addi- 
tion to his other city property. He is a plain, 
honest, unassuming man, whom his fellow 
citizens highly respect. Among the various 
local offices with which he has been hon- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ored, was that of city commissioner, hold- 
ing it for several years. He was also a 
member of the Board of Health for a period 
of ten years. 



WILLIAM VON OHLEN, now living a 
retired life in the village of Hinckley, 
was for nearly thirty years an active and 
enterprising farmer of De Kalb county. He 
is a native of Germany, born in the Duke- 
dom of Brunswick, May 14, 1843. His 
father, Christian H. \'on Ohlen, was a 
native of the same place, born in 1798. 
He there grew to manhood and married 
Johanna Borneman, also a nati\-e of Ger- 
many. He was a mechanic and carried on 
a manufacturing business for some years. 
His ability was recognized by his fellow 
citizens, and he served in the legislature 
of his native country. In 1855, he came to 
the United States, and arrived at Sand- 
wich, De Kalb count}', October 30, and 
first located on a farm near that place, and 
later moved to the town of \'ictor, and 
lived a retired life. He died in 1880, at the 
age of eighty-two }'ears. His wife survived 
him two years, dying in 1882. They were 
the parents of four sons and three daugh- 
ters, who grew to mature years. Louis 
grew to manhood, married and died at the 
age of thirty-nine years, leaving a wife and 
five children. Christian is a farmer of De 
Kalb county, and a well-to-do and substan- 
tial citizen. Mrs. Christian Bale resides in 
Hinckley, where her husband is living a re- 
tired life. Mrs. Henry Thoerel, with her 
husband, is living retired in the \illage of 
Hinckley. Henry lives a retired life in the 
village of Somonauk. William and Mrs. 
Boiler reside in Hinckley. 

W'illiam Von Ohlen came to De Kalb 



county, Illinois, when but twelve years of 
age. His education, began in the old coun- 
try, was completed in the schools of Victor 
township, where the family resided. In 
September, 1861, he showed his loyalty to 
his adopted country by enlisting in Com- 
pany B, Thirty-Si.\th Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry, which was sent to Rolla, Missouri, 
soon after being mustered into the service. 
He there participated in the battle of Pea 
Ridge. With his regiment he was in the 
siege of Corinth, the battles of Perryville, 
Iventucky, and Stone River. He was 
wounded at Pea Ridge, being shot through 
the abdomen, and at Stone River was shot 
through both thighs, and permanently dis- 
abled. He was sent to the hospital at 
Nashville, Tennessee, and later at Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, and was discharged from 
the service May 13, 1864. 

Returning home, Mr. \'on Ohlen was 
unable to work to any extent for some 
years. When able he first rented a farm 
for two years, and then purchased a place 
in the township of Victor, comprising sev- 
enty-five acres. Removing to that farm, he 
began its further development, and there 
remained until 1874, when he sold out and 
purchased a farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres, a fairly well improved place in Squaw 
Grove township. On this farm he moved 
his family and there resided for some years. 
He later built a good house, barn and other 
out buildings, making of it one of the best 
farms in the township. To the original 
farm he added eighty acres, all of which he 
improved, and during his residence there he 
engaged in general farming and dairy busi- 
ness. In 1893, he rented his place to his 
son and purchased a residence in the village 
of Hinckley, a neat and comfortable home 
where he is now living retired. In addi- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



43 



tion to his farm of two hundred and forty 
acres, he also owns another well improved 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres. 

At Pierceville, Illinois, September i, 
1867, Mr. Von Ohlen married Miss Mary 
Roth, a native of Germany, who came to the 
United States a child of six years with her 
father, Henry Roth, who is now one of the 
substantial farmers of Pierce township, a hale 
and hearty man of eighty-five years. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Von Ohlen four children have been 
born as follows: Amelia C, now the wife 
of Edward Ramer, a farmer of Squaw Grove 
township; Arvet H., who is married and 
carrying on the old home farm; Aha A. and 
Veda May, who are attending the high 
school at -Hinckley, Illinois. Mrs. \'on 
Ohlen, who was a worthy and consistent 
member of the Evangelical church, died 
October 28, 1894. 

Politically Mr. Von Ohlen is a stanch 
Republican, being reared in the faith of that 
party, and with which he has been identified 
ever since he cast his first ballot in 1864 
for Abraham Lincoln. He was elected and 
served as commissioner of highways for 
twelve years, and has also served as town- 
ship trustee and school trustee, and is yet 
filling the latter office. In 1894 he was 
elected supervisor of Squaw Grove town- 
ship, re-elected in 1896, and also in 189S, 
and is now serving his third term. He has 
made a valuable member of the board, serv- 
ing on several important committees, in- 
cluding the finance committee, equalization 
of personal property, and of fees and salaries, 
being chairman of the latter committee. 
Religiously he is a member of the Evangeli- 
cal church, and fraternally he is a Mason, 
and also a member of Aurora Post, No. 20, 
G. A. R. For forty-three years he has been 
a resident of De Kalb county, and has wit- 



nessed its wonderful growth, contributing 
his full share to its development. He is 
well and favorably known throughout the 
county, and no man stands higher in the 
estimation of his fellow citizens. 



PATRICK BROCK, a farmer by occu- 
pation, but who is now living a retired 
life in the city of De Kalb, was born in 
Dublin, Ireland, December 13, 1830. In 
the winter of 1842, when but a lad of 
twelve, he immigrated to the United States, 
locating in New York, where he engaged in 
stage driving. After residing there three 
years, he removed to New Jersey, where he 
was engaged in the manufacture of w^hite 
lead, remaining here until 1855, at which 
time he determined to come west, believing 
that a better chance for worldly success 
could be had in the then newly opened up 
states. On coming west he located in De 
Kalb county, where he purchased eighty 
acres of land and at once commenced its 
improvement. .\s the country was new, 
the land wild and unimproved, Mr. Brock 
had a task before him. But like many of 
his countrymen in De Kalb county, he 
was anxious and determined to make for 
himself and family a comfortable home. 
By perseverance, industry and economy, 
Mr. Brock succeeded beyond all expecta- 
tions. He purchased more land, still more, 
adding acre to acre, while land was low, and 
at one time owned some four hundred and 
forty acres. When land took a boom in later 
years, Mr. Brock was ready to sell, and did 
sell at a great advance. Every dollar put 
out brought in at least two. After dispos- 
ing of his farm, he purchased property in the 
city of De Kalb, and is yet the owner of 
several houses in the city. 



44 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Mr. Brock was married April 26, 185 i, 
to Miss Catherine Fitzpatrick, also a native 
of Ireland, and a most estimable lady, and 
and to them were born eight children, five 
of whom are yet living, and are an honor 
to the parents who reared them. Their 
names are Mary Ann, Bridget, Elizabeth, 
Agnes and Lawrence. Mrs. Brock passed 
from this life September 11, 1894, and her 
death was greatly mourned by a large circle 
of friends. She was a consistent member 
of the Roman Catholic church, of which 
her husband and family are also members. 
Politically Mr. Brock is a democrat, and 
has supported that party since becoming a 
naturalized citizen. He is a man much 
respected by his fellow-citizens, because 
of his many sterling qualities of head and 
heart. 

CHAI'iLES O. BOYNTON, of Sycamore, 
Illinois, is a self-made man in the best 
sense of the term. The family are of Eng- 
lish descent, but were probably descendants 
of the Norman-French in earlier generations. 
The earliest member of the family known in 
England was Bartholomew de Boynton, of 
Boynton, lord of the manor, in 1607. As 
the name would indicate Norman-French 
origin, it is !nore than likely that some of 
the ancestors came over with William the 
Conquerer. The family is extensive in 
England, where some of its members for 
many generations have held positions of 
honor and trust. The first of the name in 
America were William and John Boynton, 
who came from Yorkshire, England, in 
1638, one settling in Massachusetts and the 
other in Vermont. Our subject is a de- 
scendant of the latter. 

Of the immediate ancestors, Abraham 
Boynton, grandfather of our subject, is the 



earliest of whom anything definitely is 
known. He was probably born in \'ermont, 
where it is known that most of his life was 
spent. In 1828, he moved with his son 
John, to Tompkins county. New York, and 
there died at an advanced age. He mar- 
ried a Miss Marsh and became the father of 
twelve children, of whom John, the father 
of our subject, was born in the town of 
Rockingham, Windham county, Vermont, 
a short distance above Bellows Falls, July 
2, 1798. He there lived until 1828, when 
he removed to Tompkins county, New York. 
In early life he was a carpenter and joiner 
by trade, and although his school advantages 
were meager, he was possessed of a clear, 
strong mind, and was a great reader and 
student. Being of a thrifty disposition, he 
accumulated enough from the proceeds of 
his trade to enter upon mercantile pursuits 
in McLean, New York. Success crowned 
him in that work, and from his profits he 
purchased land and at the time of his death 
was possessed of large farming interests. 
By William H. Seward, who was then gov- 
ernor of New York, he was appointed judge 
of the circuit court, and served with distinc- 
tion. He was a man whose opinions had 
great weight with all who came in contact 
with him. His death occurred April 28, 
1869, at his home in Tompkins county. 
New York. He was twice married, his first 
union being with Elizabeth Davis, of Rock- 
ingham, Vermont, who was of a family 
known for their mental and bodily vigor, 
many of them being distinguished in profes- 
sional and business life. She was one of 
twelve children. One of the number served 
two terms as mayor of Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Betsy Davis, as she was called, was born in 
1797, and died in 1834, in the prime of life, 
leaving si.\ children, three of whom are yet 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



45 



living — Charles O., our subject; Laura Carr, 
of Jersey City; and Lydia Jarvis, of Elgin, 
Illinois. The father married a second time, 
Miss Ann Pitts, by whom two children were 
born, one surviving, Edward, now engaged 
in business in Sycamore. 

Charles O. Boynton was born in the town 
of Rockingham, Windham county, Vermont, 
July 19, 1826, and was but two years of 
age when his parents moved to Tompkins 
county. New York. He there grew to man- 
hood, and attended the district schools and 
the Homer Academy until the age of si.xteen 
years. He remained at home assisting in 
the work of the farm, and also in the store 
at McLean, until he attained his majority. 
In September, 1847, he came west to Chi- 
cago, where he engaged in the mercantile 
business in his own name, although the 
store was partly owned by another person. 
Closing out his interests there, in Februar}', 
1849, he came to Sycamore, where he 
opened a general store, and continued for 
three years. Seeing a better opportunity 
in financial fields, he secured funds in the 
east at the low rate of interest prevailing 
there, and loaned it in the west at a higher 
rate. He continued in that business for 
some twenty years, and by good manage- 
ment prospered beyond the usual success of 
men. In 1871 he engaged in the banking 
business, as a junior member of the firm of 
Divine & Boynton, but after one year sold 
his interest and has since been interested in 
land speculations. He now owns some 
sixty thousand acres of fine timber land in 
Arkansas, covered with hard wood timber, 
much of it being walnut. On his land, 
among other large trees, there is a black 
walnut tree eight feet in diameter. On 
the property he has lately erected a large 
mill, with the capacity of about twenty 



thousand feet, the lumber from which he 
sends to the best markets in the south and 
west. Also owns about fiftee n thousan d 
acres m Iow a, Minnesota, North and South 
Dakota and Kansas. He also owns some 
two thousand acres of fine farming land in 
northern niin'oTsT TTie garden spot of the 
Great Central Valley. 

Mr. Boynton was married in Ledyard, 
New York, November 2G, 1861, to Miss Lu- 
cetta P. Stark, daughter of Paul and Paul- 
ine (Billings) Stark, both of Tunkhannock, 
Pennsylvania, the latter being one of a fam- 
ily of ten children. Paul Stark was born in 
1802, and died in 1873, in Ledyard, New 
York, to which place he had removed on 
retiring from active life. The first Ameri- 
can ancestor was Aaron Stark, who resided 
near the head of Mj-stic river, and whose 
death occurred in New London, Connecti- 
cut, in 1685. He was first mentioned in 
Hartford, in 1639, and in Windsor, in 1643, 
and at Mystic, in 1653. He was elected 
freeman in 1666, at Stonington, Connecti- 
cut, and also at New London, Connecticut, 
in 1669. His son \\'illiam, whose birth is 
not given, died September 8, 1730. His son 
Christopher, the oldest of five children, 
lived in Dutchess county. New York, but 
moved to Wyoming \'alley in 1769, and 
died in 1771. Christopher's son, William, 
moved from Dutchess county, and located 
on Tuckhannock creek, where he married 
Polly Carey, and died in 1795, t>ut was 
buried at Joshua, New York. Nathan, son 
of William, father of Paul, was eldest of a 
family of eleven children. He was born 
December 24, 1768, and died May 23, 1837. 
He married Dorcas Dixon, by whom he 
had several children. After her death he 
married Rachel Hewett, but by this last 
marriage there was no issue. 



46 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



To Mr. and Mrs. Boynton four children 
have been born, one of whom died in in- 
fancy. Charles Douglass lately closed his 
bank in Carroll, Iowa, to take charge of the 
mills and lumber interests of his father, in 
Arkansas. Mary is the wife of Frederick 
B. Townsend, a sketch of whom appears 
elsewhere in this work. Elmer resides with 
his parents in Sycamore. 

Mr. Boynton was formerly a Mason and 
Odd Fellow, but has been dimitted from 
each order. In' pohtics he is a Democrat, 
but independent of party lash, always refus- 
ing to give support to candidates not cred- 
itable to party. Under the old organization 
he served as chairman of the city board, 
and has been a member of the board of 
supervisors. Religiously Mrs. Boynton is a 
member of the Episcopal church. As a 
citizen, he is enterprising in all things, and 
as already stated, is truly a self-made man. 
He never received a dollar from his par- 
ents, although he was given the help of his 
father's credit in starting in business. All 
that he has was acquired by his own brain 
and energy, and his success has been mar- 
velous when compared with others who have 
started out in life well acquipded with funds, 
and given many opportunities. Few attain 
his success in material wealth. Mr. Boyn- 
ton has one of the finest residences and 
grounds in De Kalb county. He also built 
and presented to his daughter the house ad- 
joing the one in which he lives, and both 
together make a desirable addition to any 
communitv. 



HON. CHARLES A. BISHOP, judge 
of the si.xteenth judicial circuit of Illi- 
nois, residing at Sycamore, takes rank 
among the ablest members of the bar in 



northern Illinois. Upright, reliable and 
honorable, his strict adherence to principle 
commands the respect of all. The place 
he has won in the legal profession is ac- 
corded him in recognition of his skill and 
ability, and the place he occupies in the 
social world is a tribute to that genuine 
worth and true nobleness of character 
which are universally recognized and hon- 
ored. 

He was born September 26, 1S54, and 
is the son of Adolphus and Joanna (Wil- 
lett) Bishop. His father is a native of 
Kings county. Nova Scotia, born May 26, 
1829, and is the son of Gordon Bishop, 
also a native of Nova Scotia, who was a 
son of Captain William Bishop, Jr., who 
was a son of Captain William Bishop, Sr. , 
who was a son of John Bishop, Sr. John 
Bishop, Sr. , after the French were e.xpelled 
from Nova Scotia, upon invitation of Gov- 
ernor Lawrence, was one of the colonists 
who took possession of the lands previously 
occupied by the French Canadians. Ac- 
cordingly many came from the British col- 
onies along the Atlantic shore to different 
parts of Nova Scotia, and John Bishop, Sr., 
was one of these men who came from Con- 
necticut to Horton, Nova Scotia, with his 
four sons, about the year 1762. His four 
sons who went with him from Connecticut 
were Colonel John Bishop, Captain William 
Bishop, Peter Bishop and Timothy Bishop. 

Gordon Bishop, the grandfather of our 
subject, was a farmer, and lived and died 
in Kings county. Nova Scotia. His wife 
was Louisa Oaks, by whom he had eight 
children: Eunice Ann, Mary Eliza, Adol- 
phus, Edward, James L., Allen, Ainsley 
and Charles A., all of whom are living e.x- 
cept Eunice Ann, Edward and Charles A. 

Adolphus Bishop, the father of our sub- 




HON. CHARLES A. BISHOP. 



TH1-: bio(;kaphical record. 



ject, is a farmer by occupation and is now- 
living in Grand Pre, Nova Scotia. Joanna 
(Willett) Bishop, his wife, was horn at .\n- 
napohs, Xo\a- Scotia, August 2"], 1833. 
They were married al Horton, No\a Sco- 
tia, March 30, 1852. Adolphiis Bishop was 
born May 26, 1829. Joanna died Novem- 
ber 3, 1 861. Of that marriage were born 
Charles Afford Bishop, the subject of this 
sketch, David Averd Bishop and Frankhn 
Willett Bishop. Frankhn \\\\\&i{ Bishop 
died July 4, 1894. David A. is living at 
Truro, No\a Scotia. 

For his second wife Adolphus ISishop 
married Mary E. \N'illett, by whom he had 
two children, Ernest .\. Bishop, who died 
in infanc}', and Nellie May ISishop, who 
died December i, 1896, at the age of twen- 
ty-one years. Mary E., the mother, died 
October 3, i S90. .\dolphus ISishop mar- 
ried for his third wife Eouise Faulkner. 
No issue of third marriage. 

Judge Charles A. Bishop, received his 
primary education in the public schools of 
Nova Scotia; attended the Academy at 
Acadia, and from there went to the Acad- 
emy at Mt. Allison, Sackxille, New ]5runs- 
wick, where he took a special course of 
three years. He then became principal of 
the high school at Sackville for a term of 
two years, at the end of which time he 
started for the west, locating at Sycamore, 
Illinois, June i, 1878; read law in the office 
of H. A. Jones and was admitted to the 
bar in June, 1880. He then formed a part- 
nership wiih his preceptor, under the firm 
name of Jones & Bishop, which partnership 
was continued until October 19, 1886. In 
1886 Judge Bishop was a candidate before 
the Republican convention for the office of 
county judge of De Kalb county, but his 
nomination was defeatc^d by politiral r(un- 



binations, when he ran as an independent 
candidate and was elected, receiving major- 
ities in fourteen nf the i-ightciMi townships 
of thecouiit_\. In iSo'i he was nominated 
by the Republican couNention l)y acclama- 
tion for the same office and was re-elected. 
He was again nominated by acclamation in 
1894; was elected and ser\ed until 1897, 
when he resigned the office of county judge 
of De Kalb county, ha\ing been nomi- 
nated for circuit judge in the twelfth dis- 
trict February 3, 1897. .\fter the judicial 
re-appointment he was re-nominated in 
Ma}- for the si.xteenth district, which is com- 
posed of the coin-ities of De Kalb, Kane, 
Du Page and Kendall, and elected in June 
following. 

Judge ItIsIiop was married August 25, 
1880, to Parnielia, daughter of Major Evans 
and .Martha (Smith) \\"harr3', of S}'camore. 
-She was a nati\-e of Sycamore, a graduate 
nf W'ellesley College, Xt'w York. She died 
.\pril 13, 1889, her death lieing mourned by 
a large circle of friends. Tiie Judge was 
again married Novemlier 23, 1890, to .Mar- 
tha E. Stuart, daughter of Charles T. and 
Nanc}- D. (Hutchinsj Stuart. Her father, 
Charles T. Stuart, was the son of Nathan 
and Koxanna (Phelpsi Stuart, and was born 
April 13, 1819. He died Oct(jber.i3, 1892, 
leaving survi\-ing him Nancy D. Stuart, his 
widow, and Martha E. Stuart and Charles 
H. Stuart, his children. Nancy D. Stuart 
was the daughter of Solomon and Nancy 
(Dillingham) Hutchins, and is the niece of 
ex-Governor Paul Dillinghani, of \'ermont. 
Nancy D. Stuart was born June 29, 1826, 
and is still living. 

The children of the second marriage of 
Judge Bishop are Stuart A., born August 21, 
1892, and Marian O., born January 7, 1896. 
Mrs. l^.ishop is a tadv i.f culture and lefine- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RPXORD. 



ineiit. domestic in her tastes, and much de- 
\nted III her family. The Judge and his 
\M(e attend tile Congregational rhnrch. 

Fraternally the Judge is a member of 
Sycamore Lodge, No. 134, A. F. & A. M., 
Sycamore Chapter, No. 49, R. A. M., Syca- 
more Commandery, No. 15, K. T., is a 
member of Medinah Temple, A. A. O., 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, and is past 
high priest of Sycamore Chapter and past 
eminent commander of Sycamore Com- 
mander}'; member of Sjcamore Lodge, No. 
105. I. O. O. F. , of the Ellwood Encamp- 
ment of Odd Fellows, and also of the Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America. 

Judge I5ishop is the possessor of the 
sword worn b\ his great-grandfather, Cap- 
tain William JSishoj), at the time he was 
captured by an American pri\ateer in Minas 
Basin. Captain William, who was captain 
of a company of militia, when he saw the 
privateer coming up the bay, got some of 
his men together, manned a \essel that was 
faulty, and went out to give battle t(. the 
prixateer. 'I'liey were soon, howe\er, cap- 
tured and placed in the hold of the privateer 
in irons. Captain William, during the first 
night, succeeded in getting out of his irons 
and releasing his men, conceived the idea 
of capturing the crew, of the pri\'ateer; 
being physically a giant in strength, he went 
on deck, followed by his crew armed with 
whatever they could get. (~aptain William 
grappled with the guard, fell on the deck 
holding the man oxer him, and when the 
crew of the ve.ssel tried to l)a}onet him he 
would shield himself with the guard by 
moving him from side to side. The struggle 
was short. The crew of the privateer 
being taken by surprise were soon captured, 
and Captain Bishop and his crew had con- 
trol shortly of the vessel, which they 



brought into port, where Wolfville, Nova 
Scotia, now is; and the sword worn by him 
on that occasion has been h.mded down to 
the oldest in the family, and is novv in the 
possession of Judge Bishop. 

While Judge Bishop was serving as 
county judge of De Kalb county he also 
assisted Judge Scales and judge Carter, of 
Cook county, for about two years, and has 
also presided at intervals on the circuit 
bench of Cook county since his election tcj 
the circuit bench. 

The judge is a fine specimen of physical 
manhood, si,\ feet four and one-half inches 
in height, average weight two hundred and 
fifty pounds, commanding appearance, of 
pleasing address and affable manner. He is 
a good lawyer, and as a judge is impartial 
and careful in his rulings, and is giving sat- 
isfaction to the liar and the people. 



ISAAC S. WOODS, supervisor of Afton 
1 township, and a leading farmer of the 
township, is a native of F'ranklin county, 
Pennsylvania, born May 17, 1835, and is 
the son of David H. and Catherine (Camp- 
bell! ^^'oods, both natives of Pennsyh ania, 
and who were the parents of eleven chil- 
dren, five of whom are deceased. Those 
living are Hannah, Cynthia, David, Martha, 
Catherine and Isaac S. The Wood.-; are of 
Scotch Irish descent, but w ere early settlers 
of the United States. The paternal grand- 
father of our subject was a native of Cum- 
berland county, Pennsylvania, and was with 
Daniel Boone in Kentucky. In April, 1844, 
the father moved with his family to Rich- 
land county, Ohio, and two years later came 
to Illinois, locating in Kendall county, where 
he i)urchased one hundred and eighty acres 
of wild land, which he proceeded to im- 



'HI': 



il);;kaphi 



prove, and where his death occurred June 
5, 1849, at the age of sixty-six years. 

The subject of this sketch was reared to 
farm life, and received his education in the 
district-schools of Ohio and Illinois, princi- 
pally in Kendall county. He remained on 
the old homestead until after attaining his 
majority, assisting in the cultivation of the 
farm. On the 20th of December, 1865, he 
married Miss Plnma E. Ovitt, a native of 
Kendall county, and a daughter of S. A. 
Ovitt. By this union there are six children 
— John W., Minnie E., Charles S., Daisy 
A., Ida B. and Emma C. Of these chil- 
dren, John, Minnie and Daisy have each en- 
gaged in teaching in the district schools, 
and have been quite successful teachers. 

In 1865 Mr. Woods came to De Kalb 
county, Illinois, and located on section 34, 
Alton township. He soon became quite 
prominent in township affairs, and has 
served as collector and assessor for several 
terms, and 1892 was elected supervisor, re- 
elected in 1894, 1896 and 1898. He is 
now ser\-ing his fourth term and is recog- 
nized as one of the active members of the 
board, serving on several of the most im- 
portant committees. In politics he is a 
thorough Republican and has \uted that 
ticket since attaining his majority. Relig- 
iously he and his famil}' are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, of Waterman, 
in which he takes an active part. His farm 
consists of one hundred and sixty acres, and 
its general appearance denotes the thrift of 
its owner. No man in Afton township has 
more friends than the subject of this sketch. 



BENJAMIN F. ATHERTON, who re- 
sides on section 31, Shabbona town- 
ship, has resided in De Kalb county, since 



September 29, 1854, and now has a farm of 
two hundred and sixty-eight acres, together 
with eighty acres in Willow creek township, 
Lee county, which is just across the county 
line from the home farm. He was born 
near Scranton, Lackawanna county, Penn- 
sylvania, October 24, 1828, and is the son 
of Joseph Atherton, born in the same county 
and state and on the same farm. His grand- 
father, Eleazer Atherton, was a native 
of Massachusetts, as was also his great- 
grandfather, Cornelius Atherton. The Ath- 
ertons are of English ancestry, the original 
ancestor coming to the New World in 1666. 
Colonel Humphery Atherton, with his two 
sons, Rev. Hope Atherton and James Ath- 
erton, coming to this country in that year. 
Our subject is a direct descendant of James 
.Atherton, who had twelve sons, one of 
whom, John, was the father of Cornelius. 
The latter was a pioneer of that part of 
Luzerne county which is now Lackawanna 
county, Pennsylvania. He went to that 
locality prior to the Revolutionary war, but 
was compelled to return to New York diu'- 
ing that struggle. After the Revolution, he 
returned to Lackawanna county, purchased 
land, and there spent the remainder of his 
life. His son, Eleazer, there grew to man- 
hood, but in New Jersey married Martha 
Kenan, after which he located upon the 
old farm in Lackawanna count}', Pennsyl- 
\'ania, where he reared his family of nine 
children. 

Joseph Atherton greu' to manhood in his 
native count}-, and there married Phebe 
\'osburg, of German and Holland parent- 
age. Her father, Cornelius \'osburg, was 
a resident of the Mohawk \'alley, and there 
resided some \ears, prior to his removal 
to Pennsylvania. Joseph Atherton resided 
on the old homesteail. a iiart of which he 



THE BIOCxRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and 
ty-rtv. 



lere died in 1S45, at tlic 
age ,,( fcMty-tivc years. He was twice mar- 
ried, Ins lirst wife dyin;.; at the a);e of twen- 
ty-seven years. His last wife survived him 
some years. 

The subject of this sketcli grew to ma- 
ture years in his native county, and received 
a fair common-school education. He re- 
mained on the old lionie farm and assisted 
in its cultivation, until the fall of 1854, 
\\hen, accompanied b\ his brother Charles 
.\therton, he came to I)e Kalb count\ , join- 
ing an uncle who was then living here. The 
brothers bought a tract of one hundred and 
si.Kty-si.\ acres, on which they erected a 
small house, and then set about its further 
improvement. .As the years went by, they 
erected the various buildings now on the 
place, planted an orchard, set out forest 
and shade trees, and also five hundred rods 
of hedge fence, making of the farm one of 
the neatest and best in the entire county. 
Charles Atherton remained single and as- 
sisted in the cultivation of the place until 
his death in 1888, at the age of tifty-si.x 
years. 

.\Ir. .Atherton returned to Pennsylvania, 
and in Wyoming county, fifteen miles from 
Scranton, on the 26th of October, 1858, 
was united in marriage with Miss Almira 
Maynard, a native of Wyoming county, 
Pennsylvania, and a daughter of Thomas 
Maynartl, of tiie same county. She was 
reared and educated in her native county, 
and was a teacher in its public schools pre- 
vious to her marriage. By this union were 
four children, two of whom are deceased, 
Blanche dying in infancy, and Thomas at 
the age of fifteen years. The living are 
Ella and Joseph, the latter now assisting 
in carrying on the home farm. 

Politically Mr. .\therton is a Republican, 



while his father was an ,. 1,1-line Whi- and 
grandfather a stanch Federalist. The lirst 
presidential vote cast by <inr subject was 
for (ieneral Wirdield Scott, in 1852, .■iiul 
his second vote for that office for General 
Fremont. 

The only office our subject has ever 
held was that of school director, only ac- 
cepting that by reason of his interest in the 
public schools. His wife is a member of 
the Congregational church, while the fam- 
ily in Pennsylvania were Baptists. Success 
has crowned him in his efforts since coming 
to De Kalb count}-, and he is now num- 
bered among the most substantial men to 
be found in it. 



ELIJAH CURTIS, a retired farmer re- 
siding; in the city of De Kalb, Illinois, 
has been a resident of the county for forty- 
two years, during which time he has prin- 
cipally engaged in agricultural pursuits, but 
has also shown his loyalty to his country by 
a service of nearly four years in its army 
during the war for the union. He was born 
in Douglas, Worcester count\-, Massachu- 
setts, November 23, 1836, and is the son 
of Bryant and Patience (Powers) Curtis. 
Bryant Curtis was a native of Worcester 
county, Massachusetts, and was born De- 
cember 4, 1803. By occupation he was a 
farmer, both in the east and after his com- 
ing to Illinois. Locating in Alton township, 
De Kalb county, he lived a life of useful- 
ness and respectability, and passed away 
December 8, 1880. His wife was a native 
of Croydon, Sullivan county. New Hamp- 
shire, born June 11, 1803. After proving 
herself a companion meet for her husband in 
truthfulness and love, she was called to her 
reward, March 12, 1876. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



53 



Bryant Curtis was the son of Ebenezer 
Curtis, who earned for himself an enviable 
reputation for his daring courage in the 
Revolutionary war. He participated in the 
battles in which Burgoyne's army was de- 
feated and captured. His descendant, the 
subject of this sketch, owns a musket that 
he used in those dark and troublous times. 
Mr. Curtis has also in his possession a cut- 
lass captured by his great-granduncle at 
Cape Town, South Africa. The mother of 
Mr. Curtis had four uncles who were en- 
gaged in defense of freedom and independ- 
ence at the battle of Bunker Hill. The 
Curtis family, as far back as the fourth 
generation, lived on land in Worcester 
county, Massachusetts, deeded to them by 
the King of England. 

The subject of this sketch was reared 
and educated on a farm in Worcester coun- 
ty, Massachusetts, where he confined him- 
self to agricultural pursuits. At the age of 
nineteen, he came to what was then the 
west, locating in De Kalb county, Illinois. 
Here he engaged as a fartn laborer, work- 
ing by the month, at which vocation he 
continued until 1S59, when he began to 
work land on shares. 'Ihis he followed for 
two years. At this period in his life's his- 
tory, his countr\ became imperiled, and, like 
many others of her brave and patriotic sons, 
Mr. Curtis went forth, placing himself upon 
her altar, that the nation's integrity and 
glory might be retained. How faithfully he 
performed this sacred duty, the following 
will attest. 

In 1861 he was enrolled as a member of 
Company C, Fifty-eighth Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, G. W. Kittell, captain, and W. 
F. Lynch, colonel. The regiment was as- 
signed to the Second Division of the Six- 
teenth Army Corps, and participated in the 



battles of Fort Donelson, Shiloh, Corinth, 
Red River, Kansas City, Nashville, and 
Bayou La Mourie. At Shiloh, April 6, 1862, 
Mr. Curtis was wounded and was laid up 
for four months, during which time he vis- 
ited his home, in Afton township, De Kalb 
county, Illinois. After the expiration of his 
furlough, he returned to his command, then 
stationed at Camp Danville, Mississippi. " 
At the battle of Corinth he was again 
wounded in the ankle, October 4, 1862. 
This caused an absence of seven months, 
during which time he again received a fur- 
lough to visit his home. .At this time his 
regiment was recruiting at Springfield, and 
he joined it at that place. In the winter 
of 1863-4, his regiment joined Sherman's 
Army ar Vicksburg. and participated in 
a raid through Mississippi. At a battle 
fought during the Red River Expedition, 
Mr. Curtis received another wound. May 
16, 1864, this time in the thigh. After a 
four months' furlough and rest, he returned 
to his command, then stationed at Jefferson 
Barracks. 

After its brush with I'ricc at Kansas 
(it}-, the Fifty-eighth returned to St. Louis 
and shipped for XashvilJp, to join General 
Thomas, and armed lUst 111 time to engage 
III a battle at that place. The regiment 
was then sent to Eastport. at which place 
Mr. Curtis left it, his time having expired. 
He was honorably discharged at Chicago, 
February 7, 1865, as sergeant of his cum- 
panw being promoted to that rank at Cor- 
inth, Mississippi, as a reward for his bravery 
in that contest. He still carries the ball re- 
ceived at that battle. At the battle of Shi- 
loh, his regiment was surrounded and after 
a well contested struggle it was obliged to 
surrender, but after being imprisoned seven 
months it was paroled. A brother of Mr. 



~HE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Curtis was ;i ineinber of Company G. Fifty- 
seventh Massachusetts X'ohinteL-r Infantry, 
and died in Uan\iile, N'irginia. 

After his discharge, Mr. Curtis again 
engaged in agricnilural pursuits in Clinton 
to\\nshi|), where he owned forty acres of 
land, wliicii he sold and bought eiglity acres, 
and to this he added eight\' acres more in 
Milan township, which later he exchanged 
for a \;duahle farm of t\\'o hundred acres 
in .\fton township, which he still owns, in 
addition to his tine city residence. On the 
1st of July, 1863, lie married Miss Candace 
E. Bovee, a daughter of Richard and Or- 
pha (Parks) I]o\-ee. She was born in Erie 
county. New York, September 14, 1836. 
Their wedded life was of short duration, 
Mrs. Curtis dying June 27, 1867, leaving 
one son, David G. For his second wife 
Mr. Curtis married, April 3, 1879, Miss 
Juliette E. Hurd, a native of Marion coun- 
ty, Indiana, born August 14, 1844, and 
a daughter of Alanson and Jerusha A. 
(Springer) Hurd, both natives of New York 
state. Bj' this union two children were 
born — Hortense, September 9, 1880, and 
Sarah Elloise, January 10, 1883. The 
former died October 10, 1884 Mrs. Julia 
E. Curtis departed this life December 1, 
1886, at the age of forty-two years. For 
his third wife, December 3, 1891, Mr. 
Curtis married Mrs. Wealthy M. White, 
widow of James White, sergeant m the 
Twelfth New Y'ork Volunteer Infantry, and 
a daughter of Robert Morse and CaroHne 
Smith, both of whom were natives of New 
York. By her first marriage she has one 
daughter, Nina, who makes her home with 
her mother. Mrs. Wealthy M. Curtis is a 
lady of fine talents, a most estimable wife 
and loving mother. To Mr. and Mrs. Cur- 
tis one son has been born, Leland Powers, 



Jime 13, 1898. Mr. Curtis traces Ins an- 
cestors back to John Leland, who was anti- 
i]nary to I\ing Henry VIII, of England. 

Politically Mr. Curtis is a stanch Re- 
publican and has been honored by his 
friends and neighbors with several town 
offices, serving as town clerk, road com- 
missioner, school director, all of which he 
tilled with much credit. He was formerly 
a member of Merritt Simonds Post, G. A. 
R. , of De Kail), of which he served as 
commander. In 1896 he asked to be trans- 
ferred to Potter Post, No. 12, G. A. R., of 
Sycamore, of which he is now a member. 
Mr. Curtis is of a kind ancf lo\ing disposition 
and has the happy faculty of making and 
retaining friends. By marriage his chil- 
dren and those of President Fillmore are 
close! V related. 



JOSEPH P. WAYLAND, M. D., Syca- 
<J more, Illinois, has attained a high 
degree of success, both as a physician and 
surgeon. He is of the Homeopathic school 
of medicine, well read, not only in the 
authorities of his own school, but in all 
schools of medicine. He is a native of 
Kenton county, Kentucky, born May 4, 
1 84 1, and resided in his native county 
until the age of twenty-one years, receiv- 
ing his education in the district schools 
and at Aspen Grove Academy, attend- 
ing the latter institution from the age 
of seventeen until he attained his major- 
ity. He then went to Hebron, Indiana, 
where he engaged in teaching and where 
he remained for eight years, in the mean- 
time studying medicine, and attending lec- 
tures at the Cincinnati Pultz Medical Col- 
lege. In 1870 he removed to Byron, Ogle 
county, Illinois, where he engaged in prac- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



55 



tice for twenty years. In 1877-8 lie en- 
tered Hahnemann Medical College, from 
which he graduated in 1S78. At Byron 
and Stillman \'alle\- he built up a good 
practice, but believing Sxcaniore tf) be a 
better field, he removed to that place in 
1890, and now has a large and lucrati\e 
practice, and has the respect of the medical 
fraternit)' of the place, and the people in 
general. 

Dr. Waylaiid is a son of Joseph Wa}- 
land, who was born in Culpeper county, 
Virginia, September 9, 1778, and who by 
occupation was a farmer during his entire 
life. He was a member of the .Methodist 
Episcopal church, and because of his dis- 
like for slavery removed to Kentucky, in 
1797. His removal was hastened from the 
fact that his father desired him to take 
charge of a large plantation on which there 
were many slaves. Being firndy convinced 
that no man had the right to hold another in 
bondage, and that a human being was not 
subject to property rights, he declined to 
accede to the wishes of his father. This 
made the father angry, and the son left 
home, going to Kentucky. Notwithstand- 
ing the latter became a slave state, and 
that he was always surrounded by slaves, 
he never owned one, nor would he receive 
one hundred and fift>' of them left by his 
father on his death. His action displeased 
his relatives, especially when he publicly 
advocated the abolition of slavery and de- 
nied their right to hold human chattels. He 
predicted a great war over the question of 
slavery, and frequently told our subject that 
he would live to see it, even if he, the 
father, should not. His death occurred 
November 17, 1850, a decade before the 
predicted war began. In politics he was a 
strong Whig, while bitterly anti-slavery. 



He married Nancy Massey, a native of 
Orange county, Virginia, born August 20, 
1792, and died September 13, 1864, at the 
age of se\enty-two years. She was a 
daughter of Edward Massey, who married 
a Miss Timberlake, both of whom were na- 
tives of \'irginia. Edward Masse\', with 
four brothers, served in the Revolutionary 
war. Joseph and Nancy Wajland were the 
parents of twelve children, of whom our 
subject is the _\(>nngest. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, 
Henry Wayland, was a native of Germany, 
who settled in X'irginia early in the eight- 
eenth centurv, and wlio became a large 
land owner and also the owner of many 
slaves. At his death he left each of his 
seven sons and two daughters large planta- 
tions and one hundred and fifty slaves each. 
His wife was Miss Nancy Phinks. 

Dr. \\'ayland was first married in Pen- 
dleton county, Kentucky, in 1861, to Miss 
Belle Cook, a daughter of Thomas Cook, 
who married a Miss Mains. By this union 
were three children, all of whom are yet 
living. Etta married Abraham Hannaker, 
by whom she has four children: Chellis. 
Morris, Clinton and Belle. They reside in 
Spencer, South Dakota. Belle married 
Clarence Mack, by whom she has two chil- 
dren, Elsa and Earl. They reside at Mon- 
roe, Illinois. Clara resides at home. The 
Doctor's second marriage was when he re- 
sided in Hebron. Indiana. He there mar- 
ried Mary Jane Kilhcart, a daughter of 
Joseph Kithcart, who married Phebe Ann 
Youngs They came to Hebron from Ash- 
land county, Ohio. They have two chil- 
dren, Chellis and Ahvilda, the latter now 
being the wife of G. A Dayton, of Austin, 
Illinois. The>- have one son, Wilbur 
Wayland. 



;^' 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



In puhlics Dr. \\ ayland is a Republican. 
Init prohibition m sentiment ^ While re- 
siding 111 Dyron he \va& president ol the 
board <<\ trustees of the town, and also 
held the office of school director. For 
se\'eial terms he served as coroner of Ogle 
countw Fraternally he is a member of the 
Masons, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
Modern Woodmen of America and Knights 
of the (.lobe. He is one of Sycamore's 
honoreil and \alued citizens, his upright 
and honoiable career haxing won for him 
the confidence and high regard of all with 
whom he has come in contact either in pro- 
fessional or social life. 



JACOB HAISH, the originator and in- 
ventor of the barb wire and tile auto- 
matic macliine used in its manufacture, in 

man. With limited < .pportunities fcjr study, 
or for the e.xercise of any special talent, he 
has made a name that has brought him 
national fame and honors that were little 
dreamed of when as a boy and youth he 
struggled with adverse fortune. For years 
his manufactory at De Kalb, Illinois, has 
been one (jf the noted institutions of the 
city and state, wdiere he has turned out 
millions of pounds of barb wire of various 
patterns, including the " Eli " barb, the " S" 
barb and the "Glidden" barb. But he has 
not confined himself alone to the manufact- 
ure of barb wire, but has likewise made a 
specialty of the manufacture of woven wire 
fencing, plain wire, staples, nails, the Rus- 
tler disk harrows, tubular steel and wood 
beam hustler lever harrows, barrel carts, 
bob sleds, etc. His manufactory has been 
a veritable hive of industry, and he has 



gi\eii employ iiieiil to hundreds 'd men at 
good, living wages. 

Jacob Haish was born near Colsul, 
Baden, Germany, March g, i 827, and is the 
son of Christian and Christina Haish, na- 
tives of Germanv, who emigrated with their 
family to America, in iS^6, wdien Jacob 
was but nine years of age. They located 
111 the South part of Pennsylvania, where 
they remained but a short time, during 
which, however, the wife and mother passed 
away, leaving Jacob, but ten years of age, 
an age, indeed, when all boys should have 
the protecting care of mother to shield them 
from the dangers which beset their path. 
The father with his motherless children soon 
removed to Crawford county, Ohio, where 
he purchased a farm of eighty acres in the 
woods, with the Indians for his neighbors, 
and entered upon the herculean task of sub- 
duing it. 

Christian Haish was by trade a carpen- 
ter, and his son, our subject, soon acquired 
a full kn.nvledge of that trade. On the 
farm, however, he lived and worked, alter- 
nating his labors by attending school and 
using the plane ami saw till he attained his 
twentieth year. In 1846, he left the pa- 
ternal roof, turned his face towards the set- 
ting sun, and finally located at Naperville, 
Du Page county, Illinois, wdiere he followed 
agricultural pursuits for several seasons. 
While living in Du Page county, Mr. Haish 
formed the first partnership of his life in the 
person of Miss Sophie Ann Brown, with 
whom he was united in marriage. May 24, 
1847. This partnership has never been 
dissolved, but has become stronger by the 
flight of years. Mrs. Haish is a native of 
New York, born March 10, 1S29. She has 
proved herself a helpmeet, and a true and 
faithful wife, not only in the palmy days of 




JACOB HAISH. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



59 



luxury, but in the stern and stirring days of 
opposition and competitic^n, which tr\- tho 
temper and disposition i_if man. 

One year after his marriage, Mr. Haish 
removed to Pierce township, De Kalb coun- 
ty, where he carried on farming for some 
three years. In 1854, he mo^'ed into the 
village of De Kalb, where he worked at his 
trade. After his first one hundred dollars 
were saved, he purchased a bill of lumber, 
and from that time began to contract and 
build, a business which he followed success- 
fully for fifteen years. It was while in this 
business that Mr. Haish was annoyed by 
the farmers who were anxious to secure 
sound boards for fencing, strong enough to 
resist brute force. This brought to his 
mind the first idea of a fence. He first 
began by weaving osage on a fence so that 
the thorns would prick the stock. This 
was not practical, however, but opened up 
the way to new fields of speculation and 
invention. Mr. Haish next conceived the 
idea of making ■' thorns " of wire, but using 
only one wire, it slipped and proved unsat- 
isfactory. This was in 1873. He next 
thought of putting two \vires together, form- 
a twist, with the barb between them, when 
"presto " we have the barb wire complete. 

Mr. Haish first made the wire in sections, 
thinking that to be used for fencing pur- 
poses it must be so constructed. Each sec- 
tion was sixteen feet long. He put one side 
the first section that he constructed, think- 
ing nothing more of it until a farmer came 
in one day and offered him fifty cents for 
it, but on this wire he secured a patent Jan- 
uary 20, 1874. He next conceived the idea 
of inventing an automatic machine to make 
his fence wire.. This machine must form 
the twist, spool, put in the barb, and thus 
complete the fence. Mr. Haish was urged 



b\ his (liends to abandon his project as 
chimerical, but he could not be turned 
aside, for, with a \isii;in o( a prophet, he 
looked down the \ ista nl time and saw re- 
vealed unto him the midday glory and tri- 
umph of the fair and shapely form of the 
"S" barb, which was all this time taking 
shape and comeliness in the evolutions of 
his mind. He was advised by his counsel 
to enter a caveat to secure his right, but 
the time ran out before he applied for a 
patent, thus throwing him out of his right 
to the machine. He then had it manufac- 
tured by a mechanic, who patented it, and 
sold the right to Mr. Haish. In this way 
he secured his original machine. 

The summary of the matter is this: 
Mr. Haish introduced one of the first suc- 
cessful barb wires; he made the first 
wooden spool upon which the wire is 
coiled; he used the first paint or varnish; 
he shipped the first spool by rail or water; 
and introduced it into eight states, before 
any other man had shipped any. He also 
introduced the first automatic machine for 
manufacturing the barb wire, but he was 
not to have his rights without a severe con- 
test, and no contest over a patent right was 
ever so widely advertised, never so stub- 
bornly contested, and never so courage- 
ously defended. Mr. Haish believed with 
all his heart that he was right, and on the 
strength of that belief he advanced, he 
fought, he conquered. During all this 
time the "S" barb went rejoicing on its 
way, gaining strength and friends in its 
onward march. Now, in ripe manhood, 
Mr. Haish can look back and see in his far 
reaching sagacity, the vast importance of 
his new and cherished industry, the Haish 
Manufacturing Company of De Ralb. 

Mr. Haish enjoys the finest and most 



6o 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



palatial residence in the city of De Kalb. 
This grand and imposing edifice he con- 
ceived in his own fertile brain. Even the 
beautiful and e.\quisite artistic designs which 
adorn the walls and ceilings of his house 
were first planned by himself and have a 
history or point a moral. The painting on 
the dome — the four seasons — is magnificent 
and imposing. - There' is indeed harmony 
all through the interior of this beautiful 
and comfortable home. But the harmony 
of the furnishings is not to be compared to 
the harmony that e.xists between the happy 
inmates who occupy the home. 

In 1884 Mr. Haish organized the Barb 
City Bank, of De Kalb, of which he is 
president, while George Baldwin is cashier. 
Besides o\\ning the bank, he owns land in 
Dakota, Denver, Colorado, Kansas, Ohio 
and Chicago. In De Kalb city he owns about 
one hundred and thirty houses, and in the 
township he has about twelve farms. With 
all this wealth, he is the same Jacob Haish 
he was when he worked at the carpenter's 
bench, willing to help his fellow-men, who 
are in need, and who appreciate being 
helped. He is deeply interested in the 
education of the young, and the building 
up of his adopted city. For the State 
Normal School, he willingly and cheerfully 
contributed ten thousand dollars. He is 
ever ready to assist with his means any 
laudable enterprise, and it can be safely 
said of him that he has done as much as 
any other one man to advance the material 
interests of his adopted city and county. 



TW. COOPER, a well-known farmer re- 
siding on section 35, De Kalb town- 
ship, is a native of Cayuga county, New 
York, born March 11, 1834, and is the son 



of George C. and Sarah ( McCally) Cooper, 
both of whom were also natives of New 
York state. The father was a colonel of 
the Seventy-seventh New York Volunteers, 
who, in the war of 1 8 1 2, took such an active 
part in the defense of their country. Not 
only was he a prominent leader in military 
circles, but he was a leader in politics also, 
although he would never be incumbered 
with office, but was the means through his 
party in placing others in official positions. 
In politics he was a thorough and uncom- 
promising Whig, a believer in the principle 
of protection, and an admirer of the great 
Whig statesmen, Daniel Webster and Henry 
Clay. In 1842 he removed with his family 
to Michigan, where he engaged in agricult- 
ural pursuits, and there remained three 
years. He then removed to Du Page 
county, Illinois, where he remained for sev- 
eral years. He was born in 1796 and died 
in 1871. His wife was born in 1787, and 
died in 1868. 

From Du Page county our subject re- 
moved to La Salle count}', where he re- 
mained until 1883, then moved to Carlton, 
where he purchased what is known as the 
Robbins farm. In 1894 he sold that farm 
and removed to De Kalb county, and no\s' 
resides on a fertile farm of eighty acres in 
De Kalb township. He was married Au- 
gust 15, 1859, to Miss Josephine A. Bond, 
a nati\'e of New York state, born in 1840. 
and a daughter of William and Mary Bond. 
She died in 1861, leaving one daughter, 
Mary J., who was born October 5, 1S60. 
For his second wife, in 1866, he married 
Miss Malvina A. Covall, a daughter of Rich- 
ard and Malinda Covall. This union re- 
sulted in the birth of two sons, Frank E., 
born in 1867, and Charles, born in 1869. 
Mrs. Malvina Cooper, who was born in New 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



6i 



York state in 1847, died in 1876. Mr. 
Cooper married for his third wife, June 29, 
1878, Miss Mary A. Eli wood, a native of 
LaSallc county, born in 1859, and a daugh- 
ter of Benjamin and Olive Ellwood. By 
this union se\'en children ha\ e been born, 
live of whom are now living: Mabel B., 
born in 1879; Bertie, in 1880; Myrtle, in 
1885; Ray, in 1886, and Herbert, in 1888. 
Mr. Cooper is a genial man, of marked 
sociability, and in politics is a Republican. 
He is a member of the Baptist church, with 
which he has been connected for thirty-five 
years, for thirty years of which time he was 
a leading member of thechiirch choir, being 
a musician of more than ordinary ability. 



CH. FOILES is a retired farmer resid- 
ing in the city of De Kalb. He is a 
native of Northampton, Schoharie county. 
New York, and was born in 1822. His 
parents, James and Ann Foiles, who, while 
not rich in this world's goods, were in up- 
rightness of character far beyond the aver- 
age in the higher walks of moral life. They 
confined themselves to agricultural pursuits, 
and both died before our subject reached 
the age of twelve years. 

Mr. Foiles was only twelve years of age 
when with others he came to the Fox River 
\"alley, in 1834, just as the Indians had va- 
cated that country. He there made his 
home until he reached his majority, when 
he removed to Shabbona Grove, and there 
purchased a farm of one hundred acres, for 
which he paid two dollars per acre, and 
which cost the seller only eighty cents per 
acre. Like all early settlers, he worked 
hard, used rigid economy, until he was able 
to purchase more land, and now owns a 



beautiful and fertile farm of two hundred 
and forty acres. 

Mr. Foiles has been twice married, his 
tirst union, which was celebrated .\ugust 3, 
1S50, being with Miss Marietta Burdick, 
a nati\e of Caledonia county. New ^■ork, 
born May 13, 1831, and a daughter of Har- 
ris and Sarah Burdick, who were numbered 
among the early settlers of De Kalb county. 
Mrs. Foiles died September 4, 1870, leav- 
ing live children; Helen, born in 1851; 
Charles H., in ICS54; Edward, in 1857; 
Harris, in 1S61; and Fred, in 1863. For 
his second wife Mr. Foiles married Mrs. 
Minerva Davis, widow of D. C. Davis, and 
a daughter of Narcis and Minerva La Port. 
She was born November 10, 1856, and is a 
native of Canada, of French extraction, 
whose parents came to this countr\ at a 
very early day. By her marriage with D. 
C. Davis, she had six children born to her, 
two of whom are living, Justin L. , born 
March 10, 1867, and Charles O., .\pril 18, 
1870. The union of Mr. Foiles and Mrs. 
Davis was solemnized September 14, 1880, 
and to them was born one son. Earl Leroy, 
born August 30, 1883. 

In politics Mr. Foiles is a Republican, 
and has been honored by his fellow -citizens 
with several township offices, which he filled 
with credit to himself, and to those who 
trusted him with power and authority. In 
1893, he removed to the city of De Kalb, 
where he is now living a retired life, enjoy- 
ing the fruits of honest toil. 



JO. OLESON, photographer, Postoffice 
building, De Kalb. It is safe to say 
that there is no branch of industry, art or 
science, in which more marked advances 
have been made during recent years than 



62 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



in photography. From the date oi Da- 
guerre's first discovery of retaining impres- 
sions on material substances, by the aid of 
light and chemical appliances, its progress 
has been nothing less than a continuous 
march of success, and yet the end has not 
been reached. Notwithstanding all that 
has been attained, much yet depends upon 
skill and judgment of the operator in ob- 
taining favorable and desirable results. 
Among the prosperous ard well-patronized 
men of De Kalb, our subject has always 
maintained a most enviable reputation for 
superior workmanship and liberal business 
methods. 

Mr. Oleson is a native of Norway, born 
in 1845. In 1868 he emigrated to the 
United States and located in Chicago, at 
which time he began business as a photog- 
rapher. In 1872, after serving under the 
best photographers in Chicago, he opened 
an establishment on his own account, and 
was eminently successful. He continued 
his residence in Chicago for ten years, com- 
ing to De Kalb, in 1878, where he estab- 
lished himself in his business, and for six- 
teen jeai.s was the only permanent photog- 
rapher in the city. His studio was on Main 
street up to 1896, but he is now situated on 
Third street, over the postoffice. The 
premises he occupies for his business are 
spacious and commodious, easy of access, 
and the reception room and office are hand- 
somely furnished. His gallery and finish- 
ing room are fitted up with the latest appli- 
ances known to the profession, including 
the best light accessories. Indeed, the 
whole establishment is fitted up in first-class 
style. Sitters are posed by Mr. Oleson, 
who is recognized as an artist of marked 
ability, and the most careful attention is 
given to every detail which is likely to en- 



hance the beauty and faithfulness of the 
picture. The beauty of design, fineness of 
finish, and the artistic workmanship of 
everything manipulated, are matters of just 
pride to Mr. Oleson. His merits are in- 
dorsed by hundreds of patrons in city and 
country. 

On the 8th of October, 1876, Mr. Ole- 
son was united in marriage with Miss Bertha 
Johnson, a native of Sweden, born in 1854, 
and to them were born three children. 
Derby D., born in 1877, died January 17, 
1898. Ross M. was born in 1879, and 
Chester G., in 1885. For twenty years 
Mr. Oleson has been a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, in which he 
has held several responsible offices. In 
politics he is a Republican. 



CAPTAIN ORVILLE B. MERRILL, 
who is engaged in the mercantile 
trade at Hinckley, Illinois, has been a resi- 
dent of Illinois since 1855. He is a native 
of New York, born in Plessis, February 18, 
1833, and is the son of Ahira and Melinda 
(Shurtleff) Merrill, both of whom were na- 
tives of New York state, the latter born in 
Washington county, being the daughter of 
James Shurtleff, a major of dragoons in 
the war of 181 2, and who was in the battle 
of Sackett's Harbor. The Merrill family 
are of Scotch and English descent, the first 
of the name to settle in America being 
Major Joshua Merrill, who located in Mas- 
sachusetts, at a very early day. 

Ahira Merrill, the father of our subject, 
grew to manhood in his native state, and in 
his youth learned the carpenter's and join- 
er's trade, and for some years engaged in 
contracting and building before coming 
west. In 1854 he came to Illinois, and 



THK BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



63 



first located in Chicago, where he remained 
one year, and then settled in Aurora, where 
he engaged in the sash, door and blind 
manufactory, as a member of the firm of 
Reed & Merrill, their factory being located 
on the Island. They built up a large and 
profitable business, which was continued 
for some years. During the war for the 
Union, he joined the engineer corps of the 
army, and was with Fremont about one 
year. He then returned to Aurora, and 
engaged in the lumber business, which he 
continued until his death in 1871, at the age 
of seventy-six years. Prior .to his removal 
to Illinois, he went to California in 1849, 
where he engaged in contracting and build- 
ing in San Francisco, where he built the 
first church and the first theatre in that 
city. He remained there five years, and 
was fairly successful. Religiously he was 
a Congregationalist and an active worker 
in the church. He was the father of two 
sons and five daughters, the oldest of 
whom, Helen, is the \vife of K. A. Burnell, 
of Aurora, Illinois. The others are Mrs. 
S. E. Bridgeman, of Northampton, Mas- 
sachusetts; Mrs. Dr. O. Wilson, of Aurora; 
Orville B., of this review; Mrs. S. M. 
Fitch, who died in Missouri; Julia, who 
died single at the age of sixteen; and F. 
E., who was the first settler of Hinckley, 
but is now deceased. 

The subject of this sketch grew to man- 
hood in Aurora, was educated in its public 
schools, and learned the printer's trade in 
New York city. He enlisted xMay 24, 1861, 
as a member of the Thirteenth Illinois Vol- 
teer Infantry. He was later transferred to 
the Thirty-sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, 
in which he was commissioned captain of 
Company I. Among the numerous engage- 
ments in which he participated were the 



battles of Wilson- Creek and Pea Ridge, 
serving in the latter on the staff of General 
Ousterhouse. He was again in the fight at 
Perryville, Kentucky, and at Stone River. 
During the latter engagement he was taken 
prisoner with six other officers of the Thir- 
ty-sixth Regiment, and of these seven, Cap- 
tain Merrill is the onlj- survivor. Colonel 
Campbell, whose death occurred at Sioux 
City, Iowa, recently, was the last of the 
number to go. While Captain Merrill was 
the oldest of the seven, he yet survives 
them all, and is an enterprising business 
man. Previous to his capture Captain Mer- 
rill was shot in the ankle. When taken he 
was at once sent to Libby Prison, where 
he remained about four months, and was 
then e.xchanged, and joined his regiment at 
Chattanooga. He was next in the battle of 
Chickamauga and then Mission Ridge, fol- 
lowed by the Atlanta campaign. At the ex- 
piration of his term of service he was dis- 
charged and returned home, but later joined 
the army in the commissary department at 
Duvall's Bluff, serving until the close of the 
war. 

Returning home Captain Merrill engaged 
in newspaper work and served as foreman 
on both the Beacon and Herald at Aurora, 
Illinois, remaining there for some years. 
Later he was with the Milwaukee Sentinel 
and Chicago Journal, after which he en- 
gaged in newspaper work at Batavia, Illi- 
nois. In 1884 he came to Hinckley, and 
went into the store of his brother, F. E. 
Merrill, and in [891 purchased the clothing 
department of that store and engaged in the 
clothing and gents' furnishing goods 
business. 

Captain Merrill was married at Delevan, 
Wisconsin, August 26, 1887, to Miss Fan- 
nie L. Smith, a native of Washington 



04 



Till-: lUOGRAPHlCAl, KKCOKD. 



county, New York, and a- daughter of Peter 
Smith, a pioneer of Delevan, and a sub- 
stantial farmer, residing at that place. By 
this union there was one daughter, Vivian, 
who grew to the age of six years, dying 
April 24, 1 896. Religiously Mrs. Merrill is 
a Baptist, and is an active worker in the 
church at Hinckley. Politically the Captain 
is a strong Republican, his first presidential 
\()te being cast for General John C. Fre- 
mont. He has been elected and served as 
mayor of the city, township clerk, village 
clerk and is a member of the school board. 
His friends are many throughout Kane and 
De Kalli counties. 



CHARLES BROWN, deceased, was for 
nearly forty years one of the most 
highly respected citizens of Sycamore, as 
well as one of its most enterprising men. 
He was born in German I-'lats, Herkimer 
county. New York, January 14, i.Sr2. His 
father, Henry ?5r(jwn, was born in Connect- 
icut and died in Herkimer county. New 
York, at the age of si.xty-three years. His 
wife was Miss Wealthy Able, also a native 
of Connecticut. 

Charles Brown was reared in Herkimer 
county. New York, and attended the dis- 
trict school until about the age of eighteen 
years. In his youth he was in ill health, 
and when fifteen years old was sent to Con- 
necticut, with the hope that the change of 
climate would do him good. After a year 
or two he returned to his father's house, 
and remained under the parental roof until 
his marriage at the age of twenty-three 
years. He first married Caroline Dodge, 
who bore him two children. Henry, the 
first born, was for many years associated 
with his father in business. He first mar- 



ried Elizabeth Bennett, by whom he had 
four children, all deceased. He ne.xt mar- 
ried Mrs. Sarah Hood, who now survives 
him, making her home in Waukegan, Illi- 
nois. He raised a company in Sycamore 
and served through the Civil war, attaining 
the rank of major. Addie B. married N. 
C. Warren, who lives in Sycamore, she ha\- 
ing died several years ago. 

Soon after marriage Mr. Brown engaged 
in running a fulling mill, which business he 
continued for several seasons. He then sold 
and for a few years lived on a farm, after 
which he purchased a paper mill at Pulaski, 
Oswego county. New York, which he oper- 
ated until the death of his wife, when he 
sold out and engaged in buying and shipping 
cattle, sheep, dressed beef, etc., for about 
five years. On the i ith of February, 1858, 
at Richfield Springs, New York, he was 
united in marriage with Miss Narina Louise 
Tunnicliffe, who was born at the foot of 
Schuyler's Lake, at Leroy, Otsego county. 
New York, and a daughter of Richard \\ . 
Tunnicliffe, a native of Warren, Herkimer 
county. New York, born May 2, 1805, and 
who died March 17, 1892. He was the son 
of William Tunnicliffe, a large landed pro- 
prietor of Otsego county, New York, the 
owner of many thousand acres of land, but 
who was also engaged in the mercantile 
business for many years. William Tunni- 
cliffe was the son of John Tunnicliffe, who 
with his three brothers left England because 
of distasteful game laws, and settled at 
I'iichfield Springs, where they became the 
owners of much of the valuable land in that 
region. William Tunnicliffe married Char- 
lotte Rentzau, a daughter of Count Rentzau, 
a German officer serving under Burgoyne, 
and who, after the surrender, was paroled, 
remained in this countr)', niar.ied, and 



Till 



];|()(.KAl'lircAr. K\A 



:\\ 



C>S 



shortly afterward was drowned upon the 
ocean by the capsizing of his boat. He was 
of the same family as the f'ientzaus who 
intermarried with the son of Prince I>is- 
mark. 

Richard W. Tunnicliffe first ninrried 
Eliza Jane May, February lo, 182S. She 
was born at the foot of Schuyler's I^ake, 
September 24, 18 10, and was the daughter 
of Amasa May, who was born either in Con- 
necticut or Exeter Centre, New York, and 
who married Betsy Clark. To Richard W. 
and Eliza Jane Tunnichffe, two children 
were born — Narina L. , widow of our sub- 
ject, and Frances Elizabeth, widow of John 
Harrington, now living in Richfield, New 
York. After the death of his first wife, 
Richard W. Tunnicliffe married Miss Har- 
mony Clark, an own cousin. They were 
married March 13, 1839. She was the 
daughter of Merritt and Anna (V'an Courtj 
Clark, the latter being a daughter of Ste- 
phen Van Court. Amasa Clark was the 
son of Gamamile Clark. By the second 
union were five children: Albert R., de- 
ceased; Harriet Ann, living with her half 
sister, Mrs. Brown, widow of our subject; 
Ambrose M., deceased; Merritt }., of 
Siou.x City, Dakota; and Fred, in Foxbon, 
Canada. 

To Charles and Narina L. Brown, four 
children were born as follows: (i) Carrie 
M. is now the wife of William Sanford, a 
druggist of Sjcamore. They ha\e two 
children, Louis R. and Narina Tunni- 
cliffe. (2) Charles M. is deceased. (3) 
Richard T. has never left the parental 
roof. (4) Frank H., who is in partnership 
with his brother-in-law, Mr. Sanford, mar- 
ried Fannie Cunningham, of Polo, Illinois, 
but they reside in Sycamore. They have 
two children, William H. and an infant. 



After his second marriage, Mr. Brown, 
in 1858, made a permanent settlement in 
Sycamore, and for two years again engaged 
in buying and shipping stock, but in com- 
pany with a partner. In 1861, his son 
enlisting in the army, he purchased his 
grocery store, which he continued to run 
alone until the return of his son, when they 
formed a partnership until the son died 
August 27, 1887. The death of the father 
occurred July 9, 1S95. In politics Mr. Brown 
was a Republican, but never a seeker after 
political preferment, although from a sense 
of dut3- he served for many years as a 
member of the board of education. Mrs. 
Brown is a member of the Episcopal church 
while Mr. Brown was an attendant of the 
same church, to the support of which he con- 
tributed quite freely. To all public enter- 
prises he ga\'e substantial support, always 
having an interest in that which would build 
up his adopted city and county. As ex- 
pressed by one who knew him, " Mr. 
Brown was an exemplary man — one of our 
best citizens." 



MRS. ANNA VAN HORN, widow of the 
late Orlando Van Horn, whose death 
occurred in 1897, now makes her home in 
the city of De Kalb. She is a native of 
Germany, born in 1825, and was eleven 
years of age when she accompanied her 
parents, \'alentine and Dorothy Hoffman, 
from Germany to this country in 1836. 
Shortly after their arrival her father was 
taken sick, and died the same year. The 
widow with her famil}' then came west and 
located in Rockford, Winnebago county, 
Illinois, which continued to be her home 
during the remainder of her life. She was 
born in Germanv, in Ma\', 1800, and died 



TH1-: ];|()(.KA1'1IU Al 



;( oRD. 



at Kurkford. in May, 1850. Her daughter 
Anna, the suhject of this sketcli, removed 
from IvDckford to Chicago in 1844, where 
she t)ecanie acquainted witli and niarrieif 
her first husband, Carver Butterfield, in the 
following jear. To those young and happy 
parents one child was born, Frank, who 
now resides in Marysville, Marshall county, 
Kansas. 

Mr. Butterheld was a printer by trade, 
and a nati\e of l^'ranklin, Massachusetts. 
He came west to Chicago in 1 836 and worked 
on the Prairie Farmer for a number of years, 
at a time when John S. \\'right was editor. 
He was afterwards identified with the Chi- 
cago Democrat, edited and published b}- 
John Wentworth, who was a familiar figure 
in Chicago for many years. In 1846 he es- 
tablished himself in a job printing ofiice, 
which he conducted for two years, then sold 
out and returned to Massachusetts, but, be- 
ing dissatisfied with his native state, when 
compared with the then great western state 
of Illinf.iis, he returned to Chicago, where 
he again entered upon the duties of a printer 
in the oif.ce of the Democrat. In 1848 he 
entered a claim with the government for a 
quarter section of land in De Kalb county, 
which in he due time purchased, and where 
he made a home for his family. In 1850 
his family moved to the claim, Mr. Hoffman, 
a brother of Mrs. Butterfield, superintending 
it, while Mr. Butterfield remained in Chicago 
working at his trade, thus supplying funds 
for the improvement of his land and the 
support of his family. In this way he had 
the advantage of many of his neighbors. In 
1854 he died of cholera in Chicago. 

In 1864 Mrs. Butterfield married for her 
second husband, Orlando \'an Horn, a na- 
tive of Otsego county. New York, whose 
birth occurred in 182S. He was b\ trade a 



carpenter, l)ut came to Illinois in the spring 
(if 1856, locating at South Grove, De Kalb 
county, where he purchased eighty acres of 
land, besides a small homestead, and fol- 
lowed the even and uneventful life of a farmer 
during the remainder of his life. Like his 
predecessor, Mr. Butterfield, he was a man 
beloved by all who knew him. Mrs. \'an 
Horn is a woman of marked intelligence, 
good business ability, sound common sense, 
and has many friends throughout the count}-. 



LEWIS MERRILL GROSS, the efficient 
county superintendent of public schools 
of De Kalb county, Illinois, is an educator 
of acknowledged ability. He was born in 
Mayfield township, De Kalb county, June 
II, 1863, and is the son of William and 
Harriet (Ault) Gross. William Gross was 
born in Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, De- 
cember 5, 1835, and is the son of George 
and Mary (Keithline) Gross, the former a 
native of Northampton county, Penns\'lva- 
nia, born in 1809. Phillip Gross, the great- 
grandfather of our subject, was also born 
in Northampton county, in 1775. He was 
the son of Daniel Gross, who came from 
Germany in 1750. Some of the ancestors 
of the Keithlines were soldiers in the Re\'o- 
lutionary war. 

William Gross came to De Kalb county 
in 1857, settling in Mayfield township, where 
he engaged in farming. His death occurred 
at Kingston, May 2, 1886. In politics he 
was a Republican and in religion a Method- 
ist. He was a prosperous and substantial 
citizen, holding the respect and confidence 
of his fellow townsmen. His wife died 
February 28, 1870. Her father, Samuel 
Ault, was a native of Pennsylvania, and 
came west in an earlv ilav, Inratin;; in May- 




LEWIS M. GROSS. 



THE BIOC.RAl'HICAI. RECORD. 



field township, De Kalb county, where his 
Heath occurred in i86S. By occupation he 
was a farmer and also a miller. His wife 
was Catherine (Page) Ault, and she died in 
1865. They had a family of fourteen chil- 
dren — Elizabeth, Nancy, John, Catherine, 
Mary Ann, Margaret, Adam, Mathias, Chris- 
tine, Joseph, Hannah, Julia, .\nn, Harriet 
and Sarah. Of these si.\ are yet li\ing. 
To William and Harriet Gross eight chil- 
dren were born as follows: Laura, now the 
wife of C. N. Townsend, living in Bremer 
county, Iowa; Millard F., married and li\- 
ing on the old homestead in Maytield tow n- 
ship; Elnora, wife of E. Johnson, of Syca- 
more; I^ewis M., our subject; Amanda |., 
wife of Elvin Nichols, of Calhoun county, 
Iowa; Alice, a teacher in the public schools 
of Sycamore; George and Mary, deceased. 

The subject of this sketch was reared on 
the home farm, receiving his primary edu- 
cation in the district schools. Subsequently 
he entered the Sycamore graded schools, 
graduating from the high school in that cit}' 
in the class of '85. After teaching a district 
school one year he attended the Wells train- 
ing school, at Oregon, Illinois. Eea\ing 
that school he became principal of the Cort- 
land school two years, and then served as 
principal of the Kirkland school for two 
years. In November, 1890, he was elected 
county superintendent on the Republican 
ticket, and was re-elected in 1894. In the 
summer of 1898 he received the nomination 
for a third term, and will doubtless be re- 
elected. 

Mr. Gross was united in marriage No- 
vember 12, 1896, at Huntley, Illinois, to 
Elizabeth M. Parsons, a native of McHenry 
county, and a daughter of Theophilus L. 
and Ellen (Hubbard) Parsons, the former a 
native of Pennsylvania, and the latter of 



New York. Her father has been in the em- 
ploy of the Chicago \- North wi-stern Rail- 
way for forty-one years, and is now station 
agent at Huntley and is tin- nldrst station 



agent on the line. 



yet 



living. They were the parents of three 
children, one of whom died in infancv. 
The others are Earl and lilizabeth. She 
was a graduate of the high schcjol at Hunt- 
ley, subsequently attended the Cook County 
Normal and the Illin(3is State Normal. 
Later she was a teacher in the public 
schools. 

In politics Mr. Gross is a Republican 
and in religion a Methodist. He is a Mason 
of the thirty-second degree, and has been 
prominentl}- identitied with .Masonry in the 
state since uniting with the order. He is a 
member of the Mystic Shrine and of the 
Medinah Temple, Chicago, and of Freeport 
Consistory. He is also a tnember of the 
Modern Woodmen of America. As a Re- 
publican he has taken an active part in the 
affairs of his party, although it is as an edu- 
cator that he is best known. In every part 
of the county he has stanch friends who re- 
gard him highly, and who know his worth 
as a citizen and his ability as superintendent 
of the public-schools. 



SOLISTON BEAUBIEN, who is living a 
retired life in the city of De Kalb, is a 
native of Detroit, Michigan, born March 4, 
1 83 1, and is the son of Mark and Monicke 
Beaubien, both of whom were natives of 
Michigan, but of French parentage. Mark 
Beaubien was a prominent figure, in the 
early settlement of Illinois, and did much in 
the infant days of Chicago, in building it up. 
He reinoved from Detroit to Chicago, in 
1S32, where he later erected several build- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ings, one being the Illinois Exchange. He 
engaged in the meirantile trade, operated 
a ferry whirh crossed the Chicago riser. 
and opened and kept the first hotel in Chi- 
cago. He accunniiated some wealth, pre- 
vious to his death, which occurred in April, 
1881. Politically he was an active Repub- 
lican. He was twice married, and obej-ed 
the divine injunction to multiply and re- 
plenish the earth by being the father of 
twenty-three children, Soliston being a son 
by his first wife. 

Soliston Beaubien grew to manhood in 
Chicago, and there commenced his active 
business career. He remained in Chicago 
up to 1837, when he went to Du Page 
county, Illinois, and there purchased a farm 
of two hundred and sixty acres, where he 
lived for fourteen years. In 1851, he re- 
moved to Aurora, where he engaged in the 
livery business, being the first in that town. 
After a few years, however, he found his 
way back to Chicago, and there engaged in 
the hotel business on the Oplain river. Tir- 
ing of this he returned to his farm, and re- 
mained there three years. He next went 
to Mt. Morris, Ogle county, Illinois, where 
he opened a harness shop, which he con- 
ducted witli marked success. He sold out, 
Imwever. and mtjved to La Salle, Illinois, 
where he engaged in the same business, 
but soon sold to one of his workman, and 
again fell back on his farm, where he spent 
three years of rural contentment. 

The life of a farmer did not seem to 
agree with him. so he removed to Sterling, 
Illinois, and there engaged in the livery 
business for seven years. Once more he 
sold out and returned to his farm, and there 
remained six years. From his farm he 
went to Aurora and engaged in the restau- 
rant and bakery bu.^iness, where he remained 



three years; he then went to Waterman 
and operated a road grader. He next went, 
to |-\)x Ri\er, where he kept a restaurant 
for two years. In 1881, he sold his farm 
and removed to De Kalb, where his wander- 
ing ceased. On moving to that place, he 
purchased a boot and shoe store, including 
the stock of Robert Ryles. To this his 
daughter-in-law, Mrs. O. M. Beaubien, 
added a stock of millinery goods, and had 
charge of that department. This business 
he carried on for four years, when he sold 
out to his son, and retired from active busi- 
ness life. He now owns considerable city 
property, the oversight of which keeps him 
busy. 

On the 30th of September, 1850, Mr. 
Baubien was united in marriage, in Du Page 
county, Illinois, with Miss Rosa Normanda, 
a native of Canada, born in September, 
1833, and a daughter of Peter and Char- 
lotte Xormanda, early settlers of Du Page 
county. By this union four children were 
born, only one of whom is now living, 
01i\er, a resident of De Kalb, who was 
born in the city of La Salle, Illinois, in 
1854, is now engaged in the real estate busi- 
ness in De Kalb, Illinois. 



FRANK O. VAN GALDER. of the firm 
of Van Galder & Boies, publishers of 
the True Republican, Sycamore, Illinois, 
was born near Janesville, Wisconsin, Janu- 
ary 6, 1S55, and is the son of Truman W. 
and Mary (Phelps) \'an Galder, the former 
a native of Niagara county. New York, and 
the latter of Livingston county, of the same 
state. The \'an Galders were originally 
from Holland, but were early settlers in 
Vermont, from which state they moved to 
New York. The Phelps family were early 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



7t 



settlers of Pennsylvania, from which state 
they also moved to New York. Later the 
respective families moved to Ohio, and at 
Montville, January 29, 1843, Truman W. 
Van Galder and Mary Phelps were united 
in marriage. Soon after their marriage 
they moved to Michigan, and in 185 1 to 
Rock county, Wisconsin, locating on a 
farm near Janesville, at which place our 
subject was born. From that place the\- 
came to Sycamore, Illinois, where he en- 
gaged in the manufacture of brick, in which 
occupation he continued until his death, 
January 24, 1882. In politics he was a 
Republican and took an active interest in 
political affairs. His widow, who is yet 
living in Sycamore, is a member of the 
Universalist church. They were the parents 
of nine children, of whom seven are yet 
living. 

The subject of this sketch was reared on 
a farm and received his education in the 
common schools. In his youth he learned 
the trade of brick-making, acquiring a 
practical knowledge of all the details of the 
business. In 1S74 he went into the office 
of the Free Methodist, a religious paper 
published in Sycamore, with a view of 
learning the printer's trade. In that office 
he continued four years, after which he en- 
tered the office of the News at De Kalb, 
where he was employed for a few months. 
Returning to Sycamore he went into the 
oilice of the True Republican, where he re- 
mained but a short time, and in January, 
1878, in partnership with Cass Davis, 
started the publication of the Free Press, 
the business being conducted under the firm 
name of Van Galder & Davis. The latter 
part of the year he sold his interest in the 
Free Press to his partner, and purchased a 
half interest in the Sycamore City Weekly, 



then conducted by \' . Hi.\, with which 
paper he was connected until October, 1887, 
when he sold to Mr. Hix, and purchased 
the interest of the late H. L. Boies in the 
True Republican. In 1895 he received the 
appointment as editor of the official paper 
of the Modern Woodmen of America, and 
was re-appointed in 1897 and still holds 
that position. 

Mr. Van Galder was married March 17, 
1881, to Miss Florence M. Talbot, who was 
born in Cortland, Illinois, and is a daughter 
of Charles A. and Harriet (Newell) Talbot, 
natives of England. By this union there 
have been three children — Anna Claire, 
Cora May and Charles T. The family now 
reside on California street. Sycamore. The 
parents are members of the Methodist 
church, in which he is an especially active 
worker. In politics he is a stalwart Re- 
publican, and for five years held the office 
of city clerk of Sycamore. Fraternall\- 
he is a member of the Masonic Order, the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Modern Woodmen of America. In the lat- 
ter order he wields a great influence and is 
well-posted in its various lines af work. As 
a citizen he is progressive, and socially he 
is held in high esteem. 



GR. HOLMES, a well-known liveryman 
of De Kalb, Illinois, has been engaged 
in the business for thirteen years. He is 
well and centrally located on Main street, 
where he enjoyed the deser^■ed patronage 
of the public. He keeps a number of well- 
conditioned horses, and a large variety of 
buggies, phaetons and other vehicles, to 
please the taste and satisfy the desire of his 
numerous patrons. His stables are well 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



kept, thoroufililv vontilatLMi and snfticicntly 

Mr. llnliiu'S is a native ,,f Oneida comi- 
ty, New Vdik, born Jnnc ii, 1840. His 
jiarents were Richard and Lucretia Holmes, 
both of whom were natives of New York 
state. In early life, Richard Holmes was 
engaged in the mercantile trade, bnt in after 
life gave it up for the more quiet pursuit of 
farming. In 1S47, he came west, and lo- 
cated in Paw Paw township, De Kalb coun- 
tv, Illinois, where he entered four hundred 
and eighty acres of land. This he kept 
until land was m greater demand, when he 
sold at a fair advance on the purchase price. 
He came west in order that his sons might 
be provided with farms sufficientlj' large to 
make them comfortable homes. In this 
new country he was a man of influence as 
well as means, and was elected to several 
office.s by his nniner(jus friends. He was 
born in 1S02, and died in iS.S-, after a 
prosperous and useful life of eighty-five 
years. 

The subject of tlrs sketch is the \oung- 
est of three sons born to Richard and Lu- 
cretia Holmes. He began his business ca- 
reer in the township of Paw Paw, where he 
owned a farm of two hundred and forty 
acres. He followed farming up to 1885, 
wheil he sold out and removed to De Kalb, 
where he engaged in his present business. 
He married Frances M. Hinckley, a native 
of Maine, born July 24, 1844, and a daugh- 
ter of Dr. D. Hinckley, of La Salle county. 
Her parents removed from New England 
in 1848, and located in La Salle county, 
Illinois, where Dr. Hinckley enjoyed a wide 
reputation as a skilled physician. The mar- 
riage of Mr. Holmes and Miss Hinckley 
was solemnized December 24, 1866, and 
by this union seven children were born, one 



of who,, 

i:ila M., 

S. th w 

r>.-,i I)., 



uing are 
,1, ,865; 



CHARLES A. HUBBARD, who lives a 
retired life in the \illage of Hincklc)', 
but who for jears was one of the active and 
enterprising farmers of De Kalb count\ , 
dates his residence since the fall of 1852. 
He is a nati\e of Massachusetts, born in 
Pittstield, Berkshire county, June 2, 1827, 
and is the son of Enoch and Marietta (Tracy) 
Hubbard, the former a native of Dalton, 
Massachusetts, and the latter of Pittsfield, 
Berkshire county, the same state. She was 
a daughter of Appleton Tracy, who was 
born in the same county and state, the 
family being among the early settlers of 
Massachusetts. The Hubbards are of Eng- 
lish descent, the first of the na,iie locating 
in Connecticut. The paternal grandfather, 
Enoch Hubbard, Sr , was born in Berkshire 
county, Massachusetts, where his entire life 
was spent. Enoch Hubbard, Jr., the fa- 
ther of our subject, also spent his entire life 
in Berkshire county, Msssachusetts, there 
dying at the age of seventy-three years. 
His wife survived him a number of years. 
They were the parents of nine children, all 
of whom grew to mature years, and of the 
number seven survive. The children were 
Mrs. Mary E. Robinson, who resides in 
Berkshire county, Massachusetts; Enoch, 
a farmer residing in Lincoln, Nebraska; 
Charles A., of this review; Sarah A., wife 
of Daniel Foot, of Pittsfield, Massachusetts; 
Washington, who died at the age of twenty 
years; Mrs. Lydia E. Henry, residing at 
Pittsfield, Massachusetts; Edward N., who 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



73 



died at the age of thirty-six years, in Malta, 
lUinois, being numbered among the early 
settlers of De Kalb county; Martha, wife of 
A. E. Elliott, of Pittsfield, Massachusetts; 
and Elsie A , wife of Jean Harrington, of 
New York city. 

The subject of this sketch grew to man- 
hood in Berkshire county, .Massachusetts, 
and had fair school advantages in early life. 
After reaching the age of nineteen years, he 
worked in woolen mills for si.x years. In 
his native county. May i, 1851, he married 
Miss Eunice Apthorp, a native of the town 
of Hinsdale, Berkshire county, Massa- 
chusetts, and a daughter of James and l^etsy 
(Stearns) Apthorp. I^y tliis union were six 
children, one of whom is deceased. The 
living are Albert E., who is married and 
engaged in farming in De Ixalb county; 
James A , a carpenter and farmer, residing 
near Lemars, Iowa. George W., married 
and operating the old home place, Elmer 
E., engaged in farming near Rochester, New 
York; and Marietta, a well educated young 
lady, a teacher in the high schools at Adrian, 
Michigan. The deceased was Charles S., 
who died at the age of fourteen years. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hubbard have now seventeen 
grandchildren. 

In 1.S52 .Mr. Hubbani came tu De Kalb 
county, Illinois, ami located in Pierce town- 
ship, arriving in time ti5 assist in its organi- 
zation. He bought ,1 tract of one hundred 
and sixt\- acres of raw land and at once 
commenced its improvement. He later 
i.>ought forty acres additional, making him a 
fine farm of two hundred acres, on which m 
due time he erected a nice residence, with 
good barns and other outbuildings, planted 
an orchard and tiled the place, making of it 
one of the best farms in Pierce township. 
After living there a number of years he 



rented the farm and moved to Curllaiid to 
give his boys a better chance for obtaining 
an education. He resided there about two 
years, and then returned to the farm, but in 
1885 moved to Aurora, that some of his 
children might enter Jennings Seminary. 
Howe%'er, he only resided there one year, 
and then went to Hinckley, where he pur- 
chased a lot and built a residence in the 
place, since which time he has been living 
retired. 

Mr. Hubbard commenced life in De Kalb 
county, Illinois, with very limited means, and 
by his own labor and enterprise he has ac- 
cumulated a valuable property and is recog- 
nized as one of the substantial men of the 
county. Politically he was formerly a Re- 
publican and supported the men and meas- 
ures of that party for many years. Always 
a strong temperance man, and also believ- 
ing in the rights of the common people, 
he has of late years supported the Prohi- 
bition party, .^.s a representative he was 
twice a delegate to the state Prohibition 
convention in 1884 and 1898. For six years 
he was a member of the board of super- 
visors, an office which he was filling at the 
time of his remo\al to .Auroi-a. \\'hilc on 
the board he sin\ijd on a nnnilit.T i>f im|)nr- 
tant committees, being chan-man of the 
claims cinrimittee anri also chairman i>l the 
education conmiitlee. In 1S5S he ^^■as 
elected justice of the psace in Pierce town- 
ship and served until 1869. Religiously, he 
and his Wife are active membersof the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church at Hinckley, in which 
he serx-es as a member of the official board. 
For forty-six \^ears he has been a resident 
nf De Kalb county. Illinois, and has not 
cMily witnessed the wonderful transformation 
in the state, but has been an important fac- 
tor in producing the change. He is a man 



1'>io(;rafhica!. ri:cord. 



()( exemplary liabits, strict iiitefjrity and has 
the confidence of the comiminit\' in which 
he has lonir made his home. 



MllANKAHAX, who is engaged in the 
h\cry business and in conducting a 
bus hne. with office and stables corner of 
Second and (".rove streets, De Kalb, IIH- 
nois, has one of the best equipped estab- 
lishments of its isind in the state. The ex- 
perience of Mr. Hanrahan in this line ex- 
tends over a period of several years. in 
i88i» he began the livery business in De 
Kalb, and has proxed his eminent fitness for 
it. His stables are furnished with all the 
latest improved stable fixtures, with accom- 
modations for fifteen head of horses and 
twice as many vehicles. His turnouts are 
not surpassed for style and elegance any- 
where in De Kalb county. 

Mr. Hanrahan is a native of Sheboygan 
county, Wisconsin, born in August, 1858. 
He is a son of Patrick and Alice (Carroll) 
Hanrahan, who were both natives of Ire- 
land, and who came to this country about 
1842. They removed from New York, 
where the}- first located, to Wisconsin, in 
1853. Patrick Hanrahan was by occupa- 
tion a farmer during his entire life. His 
death occurred in Sheboygan county in 
1859. His wife is yet living and still makes 
her home in Sheboygan county, Wisconsin. 
Mr. Hanrahan was reared and educated 
in the county of his birth and followed farm- 
ing for twenty-two years. In 1880 he came 
to De Kalb, where for two years he con- 
tinued farming operations, and then entered 
the barb-wire factory, where he remained 
for two years. In 1884 he was interested 
in the sale of coal and lumber, under the 
firm name of Brown & Youngs, where he 



remained five years. In 1889 he entered 
upon his present business, in which his suc- 
cess has surpassed his own expectations. 
His bus attends the incoming of all trains, 
conveying passengers to hotels and resi- 
dences. He owns ten fine road horses, 
whose silky coats show that the eye of the 
master is looking after their welfare. 

On the 3d of October, 1883, he took for 
his wife Miss Mary Hannan, daughter of 
Martin and Catherine Hannan, and to them 
have been born four children: Alice, born 
in 1884; Mary, in 1888; Hazel, in 1882; and 
George, in 1896. Mrs. Hanrahan is a na- 
tive of New Jersey and was born in i860. 



THOMAS M. CLIFFE, senior member of 
the firm of Cliffe Bros., attorneys at law, 
is a well-known member of the Sycamore 
bar, one who has the love for his profession 
at heart, and has attained distinction as one 
of its ablest members. He was born in 
Sycamore, January 16, 1866, and was edu- 
cated in its public schools, graduating from 
the high school in 1883. He is a son of 
Thomas Clifte, a native of England, who 
came 10 .America when a boy, and located 
first in Boston where he was in the boot 
and shoe trade, and in 1857 came to Syca- 
more, Illinois, where he also engaged in the 
boot and shoe trade, but is now living re- 
tired. He married Mary A. Collins, a na- 
tive of Ireland, who came to America, in 
company with a brother, when she was quite 
young. They were the parents of eight 
children, six of whom are living. 

Thomas M. Cliffe was reared in Syca- 
more, and after graduating from the public 
school commenced reading law with Judge 
Charles Kellum, and later with Harvey A. 
Jones, after which be attended the Union 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



College of Law, in Chicago, from which 
he was graduated in 1SS7. He then 
passed an examination before the Appel- 
late Court of the state and, September 
26th, was licensed to practice. Short!}- 
after his admission he commenced to prac- 
tice, and little later formed a partnership 
with C. D. Rogers, which continued for 
a time, and in 1S94 he formed a part- 
nership with his brother, James W. Cliffe. 
In October, 1S97, the firm of Cliffe Broth- 
ers was formed by the admission of Adam 
C. Cliffe, as a member of the firm. The 
firm has been quite successful in their busi- 
ness, and has now quite a large clientage, 
our subject being recognized as one of the 
leading advocates of the bar of De Kalb 
county. From 1889 to 1 891, he was city 
attorney of Sycamore, and since March, 
1898, has been master in chancery of the 
Circuit Court of De Kalb county, receiving 
his appointment from Judge C. A. Bishop. 
During the past eleven years he has figured 
in some of the most important cases on trial 
in the circuit courts of De Kalb and ad- 
joining counties. He was the defendant's 
attorney in the Kerwin murder case, which 
was on trial at Geneva. Kane county. He 
was also employed in Pooler wdl case, and 
in the Solomon will case, together with 
many other noted trials in the county. He 
has been a Mason since 18S9, and holds 
membership with the blue lodge, chapter 
and comma ndery, at Sycamore; now serv- 
ing as worshipful master, chief ranger of the 
Kishwaukee Court of F"oresters, and is a 
prominent and enthusiastic Odd Fellow. 
In politics he is a Republicnn, and is active 
on the stump in every political campaign. 
He is a member of the Republican county 
central committee, from Sjcamore, and is 
chairman of its e.xecutive committee. 



September 14, i8yS, he was married 
to Miss Esther Stroberg, and they reside on 
Main street. 

James ^^■. Cliffe, of the firm of Cliffe 
Brothers, was also born in Sycamore, and 
educated in its public schools. He read law 
with his brother, Thomas M., and after 
passing an examination, was admitted to 
the bar in May, 1894. Immediately after- 
wards, he formed a partnership with his 
brother, in the practice of his profession, 
which relation is still continued. He has 
also been quite active in politics, as a mem- 
ber of the Republican party, and is now 
serving as alderman from the Third ward. 
Fraternally, he is a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and of the 
Foresters. In February, 1898, he married 
Mae E. Wharry. 

Adam C. Cliffe, junior member of the 
firm of Cliffe Brothers, was born in Syca- 
more, June 25, 1869, and grew to manhood 
in his native city, receiving his education in 
the public schools, being a graduate of the 
Sycamore high school, of the class of 1885. 
After his graduation, he engaged in teach- 
ing for several years, being principal of the 
public school of Hinckley one year, of 
Shabbona three years, and of Franklin 
Grove, two years. He attended the North- 
western University Law School, from which 
he was graduated in the class of 1897, and 
was admitted to the bar in May (j( that 
\ear, and in (October, follciwing, became a 
member of the firm of Cliffe Brothers. He 
IS also prominent in Masonry, and is a 
member of the blue lodge and chapter at 
Sycamore, and of the Aurora council and 
Sycamore commandery. Has been promi- 
nent in Knights of P\thias circle?. He is 
also a member I'f Sycamore Lodge, No. 105, 
I. O. O. F., and of the Modern Woodmen 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ut Aiiienca. In politics he is also a Re- 
publican. He is now servinj^ as a member 
(if the board of education ot the city of Syca- 
more. 



JOHN OTT IS a worthy representative of 
the fanninj.; interests, and resides upon 
section 5, Squaw Grove tow nsliip, where he 
owns a valuable farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres, a portion of which has l)een in 
his possession for thirty-two years. He 
was born in Mecklenberg, Germany, in 
April, 1833, and there j^rew to manhood and 
received his education in the C(3minon 
schools. In 1S56 he emigrated to the 
United States, lakinj; ship at Hamburg and 
was about si.\ weeks on the l)road Atlantic. 
Landing at New York he came directly west 
to Illinois, and located in Big Rock town- 
ship, Kane count}-, where he went to work 
by the month on a farm and continued to 
be thus employed for five jears. In Au- 
gust, l<86i, he enlisted in Company B, 
Thirty-sixth Illinois N'olunteer Infantr)-, and 
went with his regiment to St. Louis, and 
later participated in the battles of Pea 
Ridge, Perryville and Missionary Ridge. 
He then participated in the Atlanta cam- 
paign, being in various engagements, in one 
of which he was wounded, being shot 
through the foot and captured by the 
enemy in the engagement at Stone River. 
He was taken to Libby Prison, where he 
remained some five or six months, was then 
exchanged, and later sent to St. Louis, but 
joined his regiment in Tennessee, partici- 
pated in several battles and skirmishes until 
the close of the war. Among other en- 
gagements in which he participated were 
Chickamauga, Kenesaw Mountain, Franklin 
and Nashville. He was finally discharged 



at Springfield, after four years <jf hard 
service. 

Returning to Big Rock, Kane county, 
he there remained until the spring of 1866, 
when he came to De Kalb county, and pur- 
chased forty acres of raw land, on which a 
small house had been erected. Locating 
here he began the impro\ ement of his little 
place, and from time to time added to his 
possession until the home farm comprises 
one hundred and sixty acres, in addition to 
which he now owns a farm adjoining, com- 
prising one hundred and twenty-four acres, 
and another, one mile west of Hinckley, 
having two hundred and twenty-one acres, 
all of which are well-improved and very 
valuable farms. 

Mr. Ott was married in .\ur(jra, Illinois, 
January I, 1866, to Miss Sophia Stoldt, a 
nati\e of Mecklenberg, Germany, who 
there grew to womanhood, coming to 
America with her parents, who located in 
Kane county, Illinois. By this union there 
are eleven children as follows: William, who 
yet resides at home, and assists in operating 
the home farm; Louie E., married and re- 
siding on one of the Ott farms; Charles \\'., 
who is engaged in farming in Squaw Grove 
township; Christian J., married, and residing 
on the farm near Hinckle) ; Fred A. and 
Henry W., at home; Minnie, wife of Neal 
.Anderson, of Kane county; Matilda, wife of 
Christian Skau, of De Kalb county; Lena, 
wife of Thomas Gormley, of Pierce town- 
ship; Lizzie, wife of Charles Cole, of Chi- 
cago, and Marie, a young lady at home. 

Politically Mr. Ott is a Republican, and 
cast his first presidential ballot for Abraham 
Lincoln in 1864. While he has ever taken 
an interest in political affairs, he has never 
accepted public office. Religiously he and 
his wife are members of the German Luth- 




JOHN OTr, 





i 


' -.jm 


> 



MRS. JOHN OTT. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



81 



eran church. Commencing life a poor 
man, by his own industry, assisted by his 
good wife, he has been very successful, and 
is numbered among the most substantial 
farmers of Squaw Gro\e township and De 
Kalb county. 



AR. KELLOGG, deceased, who for some 
years was managing accountant of the 
Superior Barb Wire Company, was well 
known throughout De Kalb county, as well 
as to business men throughout the west. 
He was a native of Franklin county, New 
York, born August 19, 1846, and was the 
son of Benjamin and Mary P. Kellogg, the 
former a native of Vermont and the latter 
of Rome, New York. Benjamin Kellogg 
was an industrious, upright man, and in his 
younger days he was engaged in the hard- 
ware business, but in later years he followed 
farming with some degree of success. 

The subject of this sketch grew to man- 
hood in his native state, and there married, 
November 16, 1875, to Miss Emily J. Mar- 
tin, the accompHshed daughter of .Allan H. 
and Priscilla E. Martin. She was born in 
Georgia, Franklin county, Vermont, May 10, 
1845. ^y this union four children were 
born: Bertha E., born in 1876; Clara L. , 
in 1878; Mary P., in 1880; and Agnes A. 
(deceased), in 1884. 

In 1880 Mr. Kellogg came to De Kalb, 
Illinois, and was employed as bookkeeper 
for I. L. Elwood for two years, but by his 
close attention to business, his e.xcellent 
disposition and upright life he gained the 
favor, not only of his employer, but the 
public generally, and it opened up for him 
a new and better field. For the deep inter- 
est he took in his employer's business — 
indeed he made it his own business — he 



was promoted to the ofiice of managing ac- 
countant of the Superior Barb Wire Com- 
pany' and filled that position faithfully and 
well for thirteen years. No dut\ was slighted 
or left undone, and sterling integrity marks 
his brief and uneventful life. For three 
years he was an invalid, the strain on his 
system being too much, and he at last suc- 
cumbed to the inevitable, his death taking 
place January 22, 1896. He was not a 
politician and filled no political office, but for 
several years served as notary public. In 
his death the community lost an excellent 
citizen and the company with which he was 
associated a faithful employee. 



DANIEL BLACK, foreman of the bridge 
building department of the N. I. & C. 
branch of the Northwestern Railroad, with 
headquarters at De Kalb, Illinois, was born 
in St. Thomas, Ontario, July 11, 1838, and 
is the son of Daniel and Jeannette (McDer- 
mott) Black, natives of Scotland, and the 
parents of sixteen children, of whom our 
subject is the only surviving member. He 
was left motherless and fatherless early in 
his youth. 

In his native town our subject grew to 
manhood and received a fair education in 
the schools of the place. In his youth he 
learned the carpenter's trade, securing a 
thorough knowledge of it in all its branches. 
In 1856, at the age of twenty years, he left 
his native town, the happy scenes of his 
childhood and youth, for Buffalo, New- 
York, where he secured work at his trade, 
and there resided for one year, when he 
came west, taking up his residence in Chi- 
cago. On the 4th of October, 1859, he 
married Miss Jennie McAdams, a native of 
Glasgow, Scotland, born in 1842, and a 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



daughter of Alexander and Elizabeth iVic- 
Adams, also natives of the same countr)". 
By this union seven children were born, four 
of whom are living: Walter S. . born in 
i,S6i; W. H,, in 1866; Isabel, in 1S68; and 
Jennie H., in 1870. 

I'"or more than thirty-live years Mr. 
Black has been connected with the North- 
western Railway Company, the last five 
years being foreman on building bridges and 
v\ater supply on the N. I. tS; C. branch, and 
is now serving under the fourth adminstra- 
tion. He assisted in the building (if the 
first passenger depot of the road, on Kinzie 
and Canal streets, Chicago, in 1862. In 
1868 he built the round house of the com- 
pany at Kanasco, Wisconsin, and in 1868 
built the round house at Escanaba, Michi- 
gan. In 1875 he supermtended the build- 
ing of their shops in Chicago. He is a 
thorough mecliaiu'c and understands all the 
requirements of his oflice, as is evidenced 
by his long continued service. Fraternally 
he is a member of the Knights of Pythias, 
and also of the Knights of Honor, in which 
orders he has held high offices. 



HON. ROBERT HAMPTON, who re- 
sides on section 7, Paw Paw township, 
is a well-known citizen of the county, hav- 
ing resided here a period of fifty-two years. 
He is a native of Canada, born in the prov- 
ince of Ontario, March 27, 1821. His 
father, James Hampton, was a native of 
Pennsylvania, born in 1796, of which state, 
his grandfather, Jonathan Hampton, was 
also a native. The family is of English 
descent, three brothers coming from that 
country in 1745, one locating in New Jer- 
sey, another in South Carolina, and the 



third in Nova Scotia. Our subject is a de- 
scendant of the one locpting in New Jersey. 
F"roin Peimsylvania, in 1 Soo, Jonathan 
Hampton mo\ed to Canada and located 
about thirty miles north of Toronto, a sec- 
tion wliich was then but a wilderness, and 
where he secured a tract of government 
land. He died there some twelve years 
later. James Hampton, his son, was then 
but a youth of si.xteen years. After arriv- 
ing at man's estate, he there married Miss 
Clarissa McCarty, born near Saratoga, and 
a daughter of William McCarty, who was a 
son of John McCarty, a pioneer of Saratoga 
count}'. New York. John McCarty was a 
soldier in the Revolutionary war, being at- 
tached to the army under General Gates, 
and was present when General Burgoyne 
surrendered to his coinmander. He was a 
native of county Tyrone, Ireland, and came 
to the New World when a young man. He 
married a Scotch lady. 

James Hampton, the father of our sub- 
ject, was a farmer in Ontario, Canada, un- 
til 1838, when he came to the states and in 
1839 located in Adams county, where he 
engaged in farming until the breaking out of 
the Mexican war, when he joined the Mor- 
mon battalion, under General Kearney, and 
died on the Rio Grande, while in the serv- 
ice, November 9, 1846, at the age of fifty 
years. His wife survived him a number of 
years, dying October 8, 1889, at the ago of 
eighty-nine years. They were the parents 
of three sons and five daughters, ol whom 
our subject js the eldest. William P. and 
Jonathan are farmers residing in Lee countj'. 
The latter was a member of the Fourth 
Illinois Cavalry, during the Civil war. The 
daughters all grew to mature years and each 
of them married and became well settled 
in life. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



83 



The subject of this sketch was seventeen 
years old when he accompanied his parents 
to Adams count}-, IlHnois. In his native 
countr)- he received a common-school edu- 
cation, which served as the foundation for 
the knowledge acquired in after years by 
reading and observation. He remained in 
Adams county until 1846, engaged princi- 
pally in farm work by the month. In 1845, 
however, he rented a small farm and en- 
gaged in farming for himself. In the spring 
of 1846 he came to De Kalb county, having 
but five dollars in money and a little stock. 
For one year he worked at anything that he 
could find to do, but in 1847 entered eighty 
acres of land, built a small log house si.\- 
teen by twenty feet, in which he lived while 
improving his place. In 1851 he built a 
frame house, which in 1869 gave place to 
his present fine residence. In his agricult- 
ural operations he has met with fair success, 
and is now the owner of three hundred and 
si.xty acres, mostly inclosed with a neat and 
well-trimmed hedge fence. All that he has 
was acquired by his own labor, with the as- 
sistance of his wife and sons. 

Mr. Hampton was married in Hancock 
county, Illinois, January i, 1S43, to Miss 
Lydia Zemmer, a native of Ohio, reared in 
Richland county, that state, and a daughter 
of Frederick Zemmer. who there died. 
Mrs. Hampton's grandfather, Caspar Wal- 
ters served in the Revolutionary war. Her 
grandparents were of German descent. Her 
grandfather and grandmother Zemmerman 
and an aunt were massacred by Indians in 
Ohio in an early day. Her mother later 
moved to Adams county. Illinois. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hampton have been the parents of 
eight children. Hiram died at the age of 
fourteen years. William S., a minister of 
the Congregational church, is now located 



at Silver Creek, Nebraska. Joseph F. is a 
farmer residing in Greene county, Iowa. 
Marrietta resides at home. Robert F. is 
engaged in operating the home farm. Riley 
J. is engaged in business at Chico, California. 
Lvdia A. is the wife of T. P. Dalton, of 
Paw Paw, Lee county. Harriet D. is the 
wife of S. M. Henderson, of Waterman, 
Illinois. 

In early manhood Mr. Hampton was 
identified with the Democratic party, cast- 
ing his first presidential vote for James K. 
Polk in 1844. From the organization of 
the Republican party he has been an ear- 
nest supporter of its principles. He was first 
elected commissioner of highways in 1850, 
and served three years. He was then 
elected supervisor and served five years, 
then one year as assessor, and again elected 
supervisor, serving five years more. In the 
fall of 1866, he was elected a member of the 
legislature, and served one regular term and 
two special sessions. During the time he 
was on several important committees, and 
made a valuable member of the house. In 
the spring of 1873, he was elected super- 
visor of his township, which office he re- 
signed in the fall of the same year, being 
elected county treasurer, in which office he 
served one term. Since that time he has 
served several years as supervisor, a portion 
c;)f which time being chairman of the board. 
He has also served as justice of the peace 
for some years, and in the various conven- 
tions of his party he has usually been a 
delegate. He is a member of the East Paw 
Paw Methodist Episcopal church, in which 
he is now serving as steward. He was 
formerly a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, at East Paw Paw, 
and for years was a member of the Sons of 
Temperance and Good Templars, taking a 



THi: BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



very active interest in both orders. Few 
men are better known in De Kalb county, 
and none more highly respected. 



ALEXANDP:R ray, deceased, was a 
wealthy and influential farmer of De 
Kalb township. He was born in Scotland, 
in 1 8 19, and immigrated to this country 
just as he reached his majority. He spent 
some years in the New England states pre- 
vious to his removal west, and being of a 
mechanical turn of mind, he became inter- 
ested in the cotton mills of the east, where 
he was engaged as a trusted and profitable 
employee. \\'hile still residing in the east, 
on the 31st of October, 1850, he was united 
in marriage with Miss Eliza A. Anderson, a 
native of county Tyrone, Ireland, born in 
1826, and a daughter of James and Eliza 
Anderson, both of whom were natives of 
the same country. By this union four chil- 
dren were born, of whom two are now liv- 
ing: George, born Jime 9, 1853, and Frank, 
January 5, 1864. The deceased were Isa- 
bel M., born September 13, 1851. and who 
died March 3, 1883, and Robert, February 
7, 1859, and who died March 9, 1892. 

The desire to better his fortunes induced 
our subject to come west, and 1855 he lo- 
cated in Mayfield township, De Kalb county, 
where he purchased one hundred and si.xty 
acres of prairie land, which he highly im- 
proved, and to it added one hundred and si.xty 
acres more. This, too, he reclaimed and 
brought under the subject of the plow. On 
account of failing health he later sold one of 
his farms and removed to the city of De 
Kalb, to rest and recruit his wasted energies. 
After a few years of restfulness he became 
anxious to see the Creator's handiwork in 
the growth and development of the animal 



and vegetable kingdom, which only the true 
agriculturist can appreciate. Therefore, 
after mature thought, he purchased a farm 
of one hundred and sixty acres in De Kalb 
township, which is now owned by his widow, 
and upon which his son Frank now resides. 
Alexander Ray departed this life in 1885. 
He was an exemplary man, one in whom his 
neighbors could trust, on whom they could 
lean in time of need. He was a man of 
marked social qualities, mild disposition 
and an even temperament. While residing 
in the city of De Kalb, he served as alder- 
man for several years faithfully and well. 
No duty was left undone, no trifle over- 
looked. For years he was an honored and 
consistent member of the Congregational 
church, having a love for the Master and 
glory of his cause. Mrs. Ray now resides 
in the city of De Kalb, and like her husband 
is a faithful follower of the Master and a 
member of the Congregational church. 



HARKER MULLEN, an engineer and 
inventor, of S\camore, Illinois, has 
been a resident of De Kalb count}' for fifty- 
nine years. He was born in the town of 
Kingston, Sullivan county. New York, July 
31, 1835, and is the son of John and Phebe 
(Brown) Mullen. The former was a native 
of Sullivan county. New York, and was the 
son of Philip Mullen, who lived and died in 
New York when past eighty years of age. 
John Mullen by trade was a carpenter and 
builder, which occupation he followed after 
coming west, but later purchased a farm of 
two hundred acres at Pleasant Hill, where 
he lived until his death at the age of eighty- 
five years. His wife, Phebe Brown, was 
born at Rockland, Sullivan county, New- 
York, her father, Obediah Brown, who mar- 



THJC lilOGRAPHICAI. KKCORD. 



«5 



riefl n French woman, beinf^ a vessel owner 
am] sea captain, who sailed all over the 
known worlil. 

In the fall of 1839, when but four jears 
of age, our subject came with his parents to 
Sycamore township, where he was reared, 
and, as he expresses it, "ran barefoot and 
grew up among the rag weeds and stumps." 
The school facilities in that early day were 
very poor, and as his parents were in poor 
circumstances he was enabled to attend 
school but a short time in winter months, 
but even then was kept out at least one day 
in each week to assist in the farm work. 
He remained at home until his marriage in 
Kingston township, with Miss Harriet A. 
Collier, a daughter of Joseph and Mary 
(Phillips) Collier, early settlers of De Kalb 
county. By this union were born two chil- 
dren; Mary E. married Theo. Shuey, by 
whom he has three children — Emma, Eva 
and Frederick. They reside in Story coun- 
ty, Iowa. Frank L. married Millie Drake, 
and they have two children, Hoyt and Ha- 
zel. He is a competent engineer, and is in 
the employ of the Patten Manufacturing 
Company. 

After his marriage Mr. Mullen saw the 
necessity of possessing more knowledge, 
and studied by himself during his spare 
moments. He soon acquired sufficient 
knowledge to enable him to pass an e.\am- 
ination, and for several terms engaged in 
teaching in the public schools. At the age 
of twenty-one he rented a farm and for 
some years followed agricultural pursuits. 
Later he went to Nevada, where he worked 
in stamping mills and learned engineering. 
Returning home, he entered the employ of 
the Marsh Harvester Company, with which 
he continued for nine years, as an engineer, 
or as an e.xpert in the field during harvesting 



seasons. For one or two seasons he ran a 
traction engine, and one winter ran a sta- 
tionary engine in De Kalb, Ilhnois. He 
also ran the engine for Ellwood Manufact- 
uring Company si.x years, and about three 
years for Patten Manufacturing Company, 
and has been with Sycamore Electric Light 
Company for four years. 

In 1894 Mr. Mullen conceived the idea 
of constructing an engine that could be 
built without the expensi\e planing neces- 
sary in other engines. During spare mo- 
ments Mr. Mullen constructed patterns for 
the different parts of his engine, the casting 
from which as fast as finished being handed 
to machinists for finishing. When all were 
done the parts were put together, steam 
turned on and the engine has been running 
ever sinre without the slightest alteration, 
something never heard of before in engine 
building. In the construction of the engine, 
which is known as Mullen's oscillating en- 
gine, no machine work is necessary except 
turnings and borings, thus making it much 
cheaper than other engines of equal horse 
power; in fact it can be made for about half 
the price of other engines of like capacity. 
While oscillating in principle, it differs from 
other oscillating engines in that it has a 
slide valve instead of an oscillating cutoff. 
Being very firm and compact it requires no 
foundation, but can be set on an empty pine 
box and will then be firm enough for prac- 
tical use. 

In March, 1894, Mr. Mullen built a shop 
for the construction of engines. The pat- 
ent for the engine.s was granted May 5, 
1896. There is certainly a great future for 
the invention, as its compactness, simplic- 
ity, economy of space and cost of construc- 
tion, firmness without expensive foundation, 
and great power for weight and cost com- 



.S6 



THE r>iO(,KAPniCAr. Ri:roKD. 



mend it to all users of steam power. The 
first engine constructed, which was of small 
size, has had four years of daily use, with- 
out any expense for repairs or any apparent 
wear or deterioration. In 1898 the in- 
ventor is preparing for the extensive manu- 
facture of his engine. One remarkable thing 
in connection with the engine is that no al- 
terations from the original model have ever 
been made. 

In politics Mr. Mullen is a Republican, 
and while living in the country served as 
school director. Fraternally he is a mem- 
ber of C.enoa Lodge, No. 288, A. F. & A. 
M. As a citizen he commands the respect 
of all. 



WILLIAM FULLER, deceased, was a 
resident of I)e Kalb county, a farmer 
of wide repLitation, who located here in 1853. 
He was a native of New York, and there 
grew to manhood, but on reaching his ma- 
jority, came west, and first located at Wil- 
mington, Will county, Illinois, where he 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres of 
land, which he later sold at an advanced 
price, and on which he made a large profit. 
He then went to Iowa, where he purchased 
one thousand acres of government land, for 
speculative purposes. This last purchase 
was also sold at a high figure, and only 
recently was the last of it disposed of. Mr. 
I'uller was a wise speculator, and rarely if 
ever missed his calculation. He had ac- 
cumulated a large fortune previous to his 
death, which occurred in 1890. 

In 1856, Mr. Fuller married Miss Elea- 
nor Campbell, a native of Wyoming county. 
New York, born in 1839, and the daughter 
of Amos and Martha Campbell, both of 
whom were natives of the same counts and 



state. The former was born in 18 10, and 
dieil in 1871, while the latter was born in 
1812, and died in October, 1896. By this 
union there were seven children, six of whom 
are yet living — F'rank, born in 1857; Flor- 
ence, in 1859; Edward, in 1861; Minnie, in 
1869; Kittie, in 1871; and Elva, in 1873. 
The parents of Mrs. Fuller moved from 
Wyoming county. New York, to De Kalb 
county, Illinois, in 1854, where he purchased 
three hundred acres of land, but sold it 
three years later, and removed to North 
Plato, Kane county, Illinois, where he pur- 
chased eighty acres of land, upon which he 
remained until his death. 

William Fuller was one of the best 
farmers of De Kalb county, a man of simple 
habits, a loving husband, and an affectionate 
and indulgent father, his interests being 
centered in his family and property. His 
death was sincerely mourned, not alone by 
the family, but by a large circle of friends. 
Mrs. Fuller has left the farm, and is now 
living in ease and comfort in the city of De 
Kalb, where she has much city property, 
and where she is greatly esteemed and re- 
spected by the entire community. 



JOSEPH C. COSTER, of Hinckley, Illi- 
nois, is one of the representative farmers 
of De Kalb county, where he has been 
actively engaged in agricultural pursuits for 
about half a centurj'. He is a native of 
New York, born in Rensselaer county, near 
Albany, August 18, 181 5, and is the son of 
Richard and Rachel (Cook) Coster, the 
former a native of Holland, who settled in 
Rensselaer county at a very early day, and 
the latter a native of New York, and a 
daughter of Joseph Cook, a pioneer of Ren- 



Ri 



THK i;[or,KAPHicAL Record. 



^7 



chanic, and for years was engaged in the 
manufacture of shingles, and also in shoe- 
making. His wife died in New York, earl}- 
in the '40s, while he survi\ed her and spent 
tlie last years of his life with his son in De 
Kalb county, Illinois, dying here when about 
seventy years of age. They had a family 
of five sons and two daughters. Peter grew 
to manhood and married in New York, came 
west, settled near I\anevile, in Kane county, 
Illinois, bought a farm and later died there. 
Alexander H. came west, first located in 
De Kalb county, and later moved to Ore- 
gon, Ogle caunty, where he now resides. 
Joseph C. , the subject of this sketch, was 
next in order of birth. Rosetta married a 
Mr. Deming, but is now deceased. Rich- 
ard L. resides in Kent county, Michigan. 
Stephen is a resident of New York. Mrs. 
Rachel C. Weaver now resides in Hinckley, 
Illinois. 

The subject of this sketch spent his boy- 
hood and youth in his native county, where 
he received a very limited education. When 
fourteen years he commenced working on a 
farm, and at eighteen began life for himself. 
He worked by the month until twenty- 
three years of age, when he married Miss 
Maria Wicks, a nati\'e of Rensselaer county. 
By this union there were three children. 
Melvin grew to manhood, and enlisted in 
the war for the Union, in August, 1862, 
and died while in the service, December 12, 
1862. Hattie P. died in March, 1848 at 
the age of eight years. One died in infancy. 

After his marriage Mr. Coster rented 
a farm which he worked on shares until 
1841, when he moved to Chenango county, 
where, in partnership with a cousin, he 
bought a farm of ninety acres, and leased 
sixty acres additional. On that farm he 
resided for six 3ears, when he sold out and 



came west, locating in Sugar Grove town- 
ship, Kane county, Illinois, where he com- 
menced work on the old Judd farm, where 
he remained one year, in the meantime 
keeping house for the Judd's. In the spring 
of 1849 he came to De Kalb county, and 
purchased two hundred and ninety-fi\-e 
acres, the farm on which he now resides, 
giving for the same nine hundred dollars. 
There was a log house on the place, and 
about eighty acres had been broken. He 
at once began the further improvement of 
the place, \\hich is now one of the best 
farms in Squaw Grove township. W hen he 
first located there were but few inhabitants 
in the township, but others came in, and 
the township was organized the following 
winter. In the spring of 1850 he was 
elected justice of the ()eace and served four 
years. He has always been an enterprising 
man and gave the right of wa)' to the rail- 
road, which runs through his farm, and also 
eight hundred dollars in cash and an acre 
of ground as an inducement to locate the 
depot at Hinckley. In addition to his 
original farm, he added from time to time 
until he was the owner of four hundred 
and fifty-five acres. He has since sold a 
portion of the same, and gave a daughter 
eighty acres. He also bought another 
farm in Squaw Grove township of one 
hundred and sixty acres, and purchased 
one hundred and sixty acres in Union coun- 
ty, Iowa. This land he held about thirty 
years, when he sold the same at a nice ad- 
vance. He was one of the original men to 
start and build the first creamery at Hinck- 
ley. At one time he owned over four hun- 
dred acres of land in Wisconsin, but has 
since sold all but forty acres. His first wife 
died August 25. 1850. April 21, 1853, for 
his second wife Mr. Coster married Mrs. 



ss 



■.KX.KAPHICAL KiaOKlX 



Sophronia R. Bathrick, by whom he had 
six children, four of whom are living;: Hat- 
tie M. is the wife of John H. Bauder, :i 
merchant of Hinckley. Susy Iv. is the wife 
of John A. Williams, a prosperous farmer 
of Squaw Grove township, who owns a 
valuable farm of two hundred and ten acres. 
Mary C. is the wife of John T. Evans, a 
farmer of Squaw Grove township. Alfred 
J. is married and is engaged in farming in 
Squaw Grove township, and Arthur died 
when four years of age. By her first hus- 
band, Mrs. Coster had one son, Daniel D. 
Bathrick, now a business man of Chicago. 
In 1874 Mrs. Coster passed to her reward, 
and later Mr. Coster married Mrs. Mary E. 
Flvans, a widow lady, who then resided at 
Piano. About two and a half years later 
she lost her life from injuries sustained in a 
runaway. In 1880. at Kaneville, Kane 
county, Illinois, Mr. Coster married Mrs. 
Keziah Scott, a native of England and a 
daughter of William Owens. She was 
reared in New York, and there married 
John Scott, who later came to Kane county, 
Illinois, where he engaged in the mercantile 
business at Kane\ille for some years. By 
this marriage she became the mother of 
three sons and two daughters. George re- 
sides in Denver, Colorado. L. K. is a 
prominent business man of Aurora, Illinois. 
Walter W. resides in Beatrice, Nebraska. 
Lilly, the oldest daughter, married Charles 
Stevens and located near Beatrice, Ne- 
braska, but is now deceased. The other 
(laughter, Clara, is the wife of John Evans, 
of Aurora, Illinois. Mrs. Ke/.iah Coster 
died September 5, 1898. 

Originally Mr. Coster was a Whig, and 
cast his first presidential vote in 1836 for 
General Harrison, and his second ballot for 
the same man in 1S40. He continued to 



\ ote the \N'hig ticket until the dissolution of 
the party, since which time he has been an 
earnest and steadfast Republican. He has 
voted for sixteen presidential candidates. 
A friend of education, he has served for 
years as a member of the school board, and 
assisted in the erection of four school 
houses in his district. Religiously Mr. 
Coster affiliates with the Methodist Episco- 
pal church. A resident of De Kalb county 
for a half century, has enabled him to form 
many acquaintances throughout the entire 
county, and where\er known is universally 
esteemed. 



MARCUS W. COLE, who is 
in the banking business at Kingston, 
is one of De Kalb county's self-made men. 
He was born in Lockport, Niagara county. 
New York, February 8, 1836, and is the 
son of Washington and Harriet (Stiles) Cole, 
the former a native of Rhode Island, born 
in 1810, and the latter of New York, born 
July 16, 1812. They were married in New 
York, from which state they moved to 
Marshall, Clark county, Illinois, in October, 
1836, where they remained until October, 
1859. when they came to Kingston, De Kalb 
county, where he engaged in agricultural 
pursuits, in which he continued until his 
death July 21, 1889. His wife survived 
him some years, and died January 14, 1898. 
Their family number six children, five of 
whom grew to maturity, Marcus W. being 
the eldest of the family. Washington Cole 
was a sober, hard-working, honest man, 
who attended strictly to his own affairs. 
His wife was an extremely refined and cult- 
ured lady, and was liberally educated. Her 
superior mind governed the home and 
trained the voung. 




MARCUS W. COLE. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



The subject of this sketch was reared 
and educated in Marshall, Clark county, 
Illinois, first attending the common schools, 
and subsequently the Marshall Academy. 
from which he was graduated. During his 
school days, he assisted in one of the print- 
ing offices as compositor, and became quite 
proficient in that line. He arri\ed in 
Kmgston. De Kalb county, April 4, 1856, 
and in the summer following engaged in 
farming in the employment of his uncle. 
Dr. J. W. Stiles, who was a prominent den- 
tist, real estate owner and mone\' lender. 
During the following winters, he faithfully 
and satisfactorily taught three different 
terms in Boone county, and taught four 
winters in De Kalb county, a vocation in 
which he continued a portion of his time 
until 1S6S. 

In 1S5.S, Mr. Cole rented a farm, and 
worked it on his own account. In Septem- 
ber of the same year, he was joined in wed- 
lock to Miss Anna L. Little, a daughter of 
Henry and Am}' Little, and to them one 
child was born, Alice C .\pril 21, iSrti, 
and now the wife of Judge ^^'. L. Pond, of 
De Kalb, a sketch of wiiom appears else- 
where in this book. Afler their marringe 
they fi.xed u]i a house on a fnrty-acie lot, 
belonging to his wife, in which the\' lived 
and worked in connection with one hundred 
acres of rented land until 1868, when he 
purchased a farm of one hundred and eighty 
acres, upon which he put some impro\'e- 
ments, and there resided until 1882, when 
he removed to Kingston, and formed a co- 
partnership with Phillip Heckman, under 
the firm name of Heckman & Cole, and en- 
gaged in the hardware business. This part- 
nership continued a few years, when the 
firm agreed to e.xchange their business for a 
farm owned by Dr. C. G. Cowell. During 



this co-partnership, the firm almost uncon- 
sciously drifted into the banking business, 
on a small scale at first, but which after- 
wards became of enlarged proportions. Mr. 
Heckman purchasing the interest of Mr. 
Cole in the farm, the latter, m 1888, en- 
tered the banking business on a large scale, 
in due and legal form, at first using his pri- 
vate residence, but in 189.1 erecting a suit- 
able brick structure, with vault attached, 
and which building he now occupies. He 
does a good banking business for a town 
the size of Kingston, the business a\-eraging 
over two thousand dollars per day. 

Mr. Cole is one of the most popular 
men in his town and township, for five 
x'ears he served as constable, and was 
township collector for eight years. In 1876 
he was appointed school treasurer, which 
office he still holds. Between 1 88 5 and 
1894 he held the office of town clerk, and 
in 1895 was elected supervisor of his 
township, and re-elected in 1897. He was 
appointed postmaster of Kingston, during 
Harrison's administration, and sorved five 
years. He is a stanch Republican, and has 
been repeatedly appointed as delegate to 
the county conventions of his party, and 
also to the senatorial and congressional 
convention and to state conventions. In 
all the positions filled he has been true 
to his conxictions. He has ne\er deserted 
his part}- or its principles, and he has the 
entire confidence of the people. 

Mr. Cole is a member of the Masonic 
fraternity, being initiated in the Genoa 
Lodge, Xo. 288, and was raisecf to the sub- 
lime degree of Master Mason, July 21, 
1866. He passed through the Royal Arch, 
in March, 1888, and was made a Sir Knight 
in the same year. He acted as secretary 
of the blue lodge from the time he was 



92 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



raised until 1886. He was transferred to 
and received in the Kishwaukee Lodge, No. 
402, in the last named year. At three dif- 
ferent limes he was sent as a representative 
to the grand lodge. He is a charter mem- 
ber of the Modern Woodmen of America, 
and originator of the Woodmen's annual 
picnic, which includes the Northern Illi- 
nois and Southern Wisconsin Picnic Asso- 
ciation. He is a charter member of the 
Knights of the Globe. 

Mr. Cole is a loyal citi;ien and extremely 
patriotic, and was only prevented from en- 
tering as a soldier in the great civil struggle 
by disability incurred while operating a 
threshing machine in November, 1862, 
while making preparations to enlist. The 
Grand Army of the Republic of Kingston 
made him an honorary member in 1S86, 
and in the work of the post he takes great 
pride, and liberally contributes to its work. 
Mr. and Mrs. Cole are members of the 
Free \\'ill Baptist church, and active in 
every holy and righteous enterprise that 
may be in progress. He is a trustee of the 
church in Kingston, and has filled the ofSce 
of Sunday school superintendent for more 
than fifteen years, and is yet serving cred- 
itably in the same position. For six years 
he has served as clerk of the Fox river 
quarterly meeting of the Free Will Baptist 
church. 

Mrs. Cole was born in Aurora, Erie 
county. New York. July 24, 1840. Her 
parents, Henry and Amy Little, removed to 
Illinois, in 1845, locating in Kingston town- 
ship, De Kalb county, where they remained 
during the remainder of their lives. Mr. 
Little's death occurred August 18, 1858, 
while that of his wife took place Septem- 
ber 15, 1891. Mrs. Cole is a refined and 
modest lady, and like her husband is quite 



popular. She is a member of the Woman's 
Relief Corps, of Kingston, of which she 
has the honor of being president. She 
has also been highly honored by being ap- 
pointed aid to Carrie Thomas Alexander, 
department president. She is also a mem- 
ber of the Eastern Star, and of the Emi- 
nent Ladies Garrison. Mr. and Mrs. Cole 
are very desirable companions, ever ready 
to greet a friend or entertain a visitor. 



HERBERT W. FAY, one of the editors 
and proprietors of the De Kalb Re- 
view, is one of the best known men in De 
Kalb county, with a national reputation. 
He was born February 28, 1859, in Squaw 
Grove township, De Kalb county, Illinois, 
and is the son of Edwin H. and Ann Hay- 
wood Fay, natives of New York and Maine, 
and the grandson of Horace W. Fay, who 
came to De Kalb county, from New York, 
in 1838. For several years the grandfather 
served as county surveyor of De Kalb coun- 
ty, and as a patriot, he enlisted during the 
war for the Union, and served his countr}' 
faithfully and well, giving up his life in its de- 
fense, at \'icksburg, Mississippi, in the spring 
of 1863. Edwin Fay, the father, also set- 
tled in De Kalb county, in 1838, and after- 
wards on a soldier's land warrant, obtained 
for services in the Sixteenth Kentucky In- 
fantry, with which he was connected for 
sixteen months during the Mexican war, 
obtained a tract of land. He is yet living 
in the village of Hinckley, but his good wife 
passed to her reward November it, 1884. 

Herbert W. Fay, our subject, grew to 
manhood in his native township, and re- 
ceived his primary education in the com- 
mon schools. He later attended college at 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Monmouth, Illinois, for three \-ears, taught 
school one term, and then purchased a 
third interest in the Hinckley Review, and 
remained in company with Toniblin Broth- 
ers, the former proprietors, from May, 
1880, to 1882, when he became sole pro- 
prietor. In March, 1887, he removed to De 
Kalb where he purchased a half interest in 
the De Kalb Rexiew, in company with D. 
W. Tyrrell. This is a flourishing weekly 
paper, and a stanch advocate of Republican 
principles, with a growing circulation of 
fifteen hundred copies. 

At Hinckley, Illinois, September 24, 
1884, Mr. Fay was united in marriage with 
Miss Nellie A. Sebree, also a native of 
Squaw Grove township, born December 2r, 
1864, and the daughter of William M. and 
Rosetta Sebree. To this happy union there 
was born Earl Owen, October 24, 1885. 
William M. Sebree, the father of Mrs. Fay, 
is probably the oldest living settler in De 
Kalb county. He is a native of Indiana, 
born February 7, 1833, and is the son of 
John Sebree, a native of \'irginia, born Au- 
gust 2, 1 80S. ^^"ith his father, he came to 
De Kalb county, in 1S34, when but little 
more than a \ear old, and has here since 
spent his entire life. 

Horace \\'. Fay, the grandfather of our 
subject, was a very prominent man in polit- 
ical affairs, and served as a member of the 
Illinois legislature, from 1848 to 18 so. As 
a surveyor he laid out nearly all of De Kalb 
county. His grandson has received his 
mantle, for he, too, is a prominent young 
man of more than ordinary ability, and is 
the present county surveyor of De Kalb 
count)-. He served for three years as a 
member of the De Kalb board of educa- 
tion. Fraternally he is a member of the 
Sons of Veterans, Chicago Press Club, 



Knights of Pythias, Royal Arcanum, Knights 
of the Globe and Modern Woodmen of 
.•\merica. While residing in Hinckley he 
ser\ed as village clerk and was also town 
clerk of Squaw Grove township. He is a 
man of versatile talents and has a decided 
predilection for a literary career. He pos- 
sesses a fine discriminating taste for artistic 
work and is an accomplished draughtsman, 
while his pencil specimens are \-ery fine. 

Once in a while one meets a man who 
is quietly pursuing a line of work in the 
achievement of a great purpose, and whose 
high aims and patient labors are never sus- 
pected until suddenly revealed and the great 
service that is being rendered the world is 
recognized. Such a man is Herbert W. 
I""ay, the subject of this sketch. Mr Fas- 
is a collector of historical portraits as well 
as an able editor, and has now one of the 
largest private collections of portraits of 
notable people in the world. The collec- 
tion was begun by Mr. Fay in 1869. first by 
collecting the faces of his friends in an or- 
dinary album. After that was filled he began 
another, and then one with the likenesses 
of distinguished persons. Book after book 
was filled until his albums were liiscarded 
and large showcases were substituted. His 
ciillection now numbers fifty thousand pho- 
tographs of people in all spheres of life. He 
has photographs of nearly all the crowned 
heads of the nations of the globe. The 
collection includes ninety different sittings 
of Lincoln and twenty-five of Longfellow. 
He is the owner of the McXulta original 
negative of Lincoln and has photographs of 
kings, queens, presidents, ex-presidents, 
judges of the supreme court. United States 
senators, representatives, authors, scientists, 
inventors, artists, etc. This collection is 
the result of twentv-nine 3-ears of hard la- 



94 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



bor and is worth s;oinK hundreds of miles to 
see. 

A few years ago he conceived the idea 
to establish a portrait loan agency for the 
benefit of pubhshers of books, magazines 
and newspapers and has worked up a good 
business in this hue, In this way he made 
what was once a fad a source of revenue. 
He was associate editor of the National 
Cyclopedia of American Biography, pub- 
lished in New York, and many of the por- 
traits used to illustrate this great work are 
from his collection. He furnished at one 
time five hundred pictures of prominent 
people of this and other countries for the 
Americanized edition of the Encyclopedia 
Brittanica. His series of Lincoln portraits 
were used in McChire's Life of Lincoln. 
Notwithstanding his varied attainments Mr. 
Fav is a very modest man. 



MRS. SARAH CHAPMAN, widow of 
Julius Chapman, was born iu New 
York state in 1823. She is the daughter of 
Henry and Jane Durham, her father being 
a native of New York, born in 1798. He 
removed to De Kalb county, Illinois, in 
1836, and the following year made a perma- 
nent location in Genoa. He became the 
owner of a vast amount of land on which he 
built e.xtensively. -\ man of marked ability 
and influence, he held many offices of im- 
portance in the early days. He was a justice 
cjf the peace for some years as well as super- 
visor of the township. For several years 
he engaged in mercantile business, keeping 
a general store, but failing health caiised 
hinh to abandon it. He died in February-, 
1855, at the age of fifty-six years. His 
wife, Jane ^^'ager, died in Noxember of the 
same vear. 



|ulius Chajiman, the husband of Mrs. 
Sarah Chapman, was a native of Ohio, born 
in 1S12, and who removed to Genoa, De 
Kalb county, in 1837. Bj' trade he was a 
carpenter, at which he worked for several 
years after he came to De Kalb county. 
He was an e-\tensi\'e dealer in real estate 
and at one time owned eleven hundred acres 
in De Kalb county. He was a live business 
man, knowing when to buy and when to 
sell. As he advanced in years he abandoned 
his trade, except to work on his own prop- 
erty, and turned his attention to agricultural 
pursuits. He held the office of justice of the 
peace, supervisor and other official positions, 
and was looked to as a man of influence in 
his neighborhood. He married Miss Sarah 
Durham, in September, 1842, at Genoa. 
x-\fter nearly fifty years of a happy married 
life he was called to his reward in October, 
1 89 1. About 1867 Mrs. Chapman took to 
live with her a niece, Edna Harris, a daugh- 
ter of her deceased sister Caroline, wife of 
L. C. Harris. This niece grew to be an 
accomplished young lady, knowing only the 
love of her foster mother, who loved her as 
her own. In September, 188 i .she was united 
in marriage to Charles R. I>urton, a young 
farmer, and to this happy union three chil- 
dren were born: Jessie F., Edgar C. and 
Sidney F. Mrs. Burton was born in Genoa 
December 31, 1861. Charles R. Burton 
was born in Elgin, Kane county, Illinois, in 
March, 1855, and is the son of Francis and 
Mary (Pool) Burton, the former a native of 
Canada and the latter of England. In 
1840 they came from Canada to Illinois, 
locating in Kane county, on the farm where 
they now reside. Charles Burton was reared 
and educated in Kane county and came to 
De Kalb county in 1878, where, with the 
exception of a few years, he has since con- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



9S 



tinued to reside. His principal work is 
farming, but at times he has been engaged 
in butter and cheese making. He is a prac- 
tical and up-to-date farmer, and has li\'ed 
on the home farm of J^frs. Chapman for the 
past seven years. 

The paternal grandfather of Mrs. Chap- 
man, Michael Durham, was a soldier in the 
Revolutionary war, and was as brave a 
soldier as ever put a gun to his shoulder. 
Mrs. Chapman is now the owner of three 
large farms, embracing five hundred acres 
of choice land. She is a woman of good 
business abilit\-, and is well known and 
highly esteemed in the community which 
has so long been her home. 



JOHN D. JOHNSON, foreman of the 
shipping de})artinent o( the Elhvood 
Manufacturing Company, Pleasant street, 
De Kalb, Illinois, and who makes his home 
in Sycamore, is a native of Sweden, born in 
1856. He is the son of John and Christina 
Johnson, also natives of Sweden, and who 
still reside in their native land. Under the 
parental roof, our subject grew to manhood, 
received a fair education in the parochial 
schools, and at the age of si.xteen years 
was confirmed as a member of the Lutheran 
church. With that laudable desire to better 
himself in life, and believing the New World 
afforded better opportunities than the Old, 
he determined to come to the United States. 
Accordingly, in 1S82, he left his native 
land, and after landing at New York, im- 
mediately came west, locating in Sycamore, 
where he has since continued to reside. 

In June, 1884, two years after his arri- 
val in Sycamore, he was united in marriage 
with Miss Anna Peterson, and they now 
have a family of five children as follows: 



Ella, Arthur, Herman, Ebbe and Pearl. 
One year after his arrival, he applied for 
naturalization papers, which he in due time 
secured, and has since been recognized as 
one true to his adopted country. He now 
resides with his family in a pleasant and 
comfortable home on Har\ester street. 
Sycamore, the result of industry, honesty 
and economy. 

On his arrival at Sycamore, Mr. John- 
son at once entered the employ of the Ell- 
wood Manufacturing Company, and has 
now filled a period of si.xteen years in its 
ser\ice. His present position of foreman 
he has held for ten years. This goes to 
show his faithfulness and the high esteem 
in which he is held by his employers. While 
ne\er serving an apprenticeship to any 
trade, he is a natural mechanic, and can 
turn his hand t<j almost any kind of busi- 
ness. He has entire charge of all the ship- 
ping of the large factory in which he is em- 
ployed, and which ships farm machinery all 
over the United States. Previous to his 
coming to this country, he served as a sol- 
dier for two years in his native land, and is 
even now ready to serve his adopted coun- 
try, if such services should ever be needed. 
He is a good Christian man, and a member 
in good standing in the Swedish Lutheran 
church in Sycamore, his wife being also a 
member of the same body. 



JOHN H. WOODBURY, a farmer re- 
siding on section 34, Shabbona town- 
ship, is well known throughout De Kalb 
and adjoining counties, not only as a good 
farmer, but as a first-class auctioneer, hav- 
ing cried many sales throughout northern 
Illinois. He is a !iative of Tompkins coun- 
ty, Neiv York, born in the town u( Ithaca, 



96 



THli BIOr.RAPPilCAL RECORD. 



September J 5, 1834, and is the son of 
Thomas Woodbury, a native of \"erniunt. 
and a grandson of \\'illiHm Woodbury, also 
a native of X'erniont, and a soldier in the 
war of 18 r J. The latter reino\'ed from 
\'ermont to New 'S'ork with his family 
and became one of the piooneer settlers 
of Tompkins county, where he purchased 
a larfje tract of laml. and there resided 
dunn- the remainder of his life. Thomas 
Woodbury, his son and the father of our 
subject, there grew to manhood and mar- 
ried Mary Williams, a native of New 
York, and a daughter of Charles Williams, 
also an early settler of Tompkins county. 
Forsome years after his marriage Thomas 
Woodbury owned and operated a farm in 
Tompkins county, but in 1843 moved 
west, arriving in Chicago. June 10, and 
locating near the village, as it then was, 
he there remained about one year, then 
went to Wisconsin and made a permanent 
location in Rock county, near Milton Junc- 
tion, where he purchased a tract of land 
and engaged in farming, and there spent 
the remainder of his life, dying in March, 
1850. His wife survived him but a few 
months, dying in August the following year. 
The>' were the parents of fi\e children, all 
of whom are yet living. 

Our subject was but nine years of age 
when the family came to Illinois. For 
some time he was engaged in driving the 
stage from Middletown to Janesville and 
Whitewater, Wisconsin, and later went to 
St. Charles, Illinois, and for two _\ears drove 
the stage. Leaving the stage company at 
Ottawa, Illinois, he went to New Orleans 
and ran on the river a part of two years. 
Later he went to Havana, Cuba, from which 
place he returned and located in southern 
Illinois, and was engaged with the Strawns 



in handling cattle. In 1852 he came to De 
I\alb count) and wt-nt to work t)n a farm by 
the month near Sandwich, and the follow- 
ing year rented land, which he continued to 
do some three or four years. He later pur- 
chased one hundred and sixty acres in Shab- 
bona township, the place being fairly well 
impro\ed. From time to time he purchased 
more land, some of which he sold off, but 
still owns a valuable farm of three hundred 
and tort\' acres, and has been ■ extensively 
engaged in general farming, stock-raising 
and dairying. In 1858 he commenced auc- 
tioneering in LaSalle county, and followed 
that occupation for a year or two, and then 
abandoned it for several years, but later re- 
sumed and has now for many years had the 
reputation of being one of the best auction- 
eers in northern Illinois. 

On the 29th of February, 1856. Mr. 
Woodbury was united in La Salle county, 
to Miss Laura A. Smith, a native of Herki- 
mer county, New York, and a daughter of 
Rensselaer Smith, who located in La Salle 
county, in 1845. This wife died November 
8, 1890, leaving four children. Prof. Will- 
iam W., married, is principal of the schools 
at Sandwich, Illinois. Elias married, and 
is a business man residing in Sutherland, 
Iowa. Ahin J. is married, and is now- 
operating the home farm. Minnie M. is 
the wife of Professor Ladd, a teacher of 
Warren, Illinois. 

Politically Mr. Woodbury has been a 
Republican since the organization of the 
part}'. He has ser\ed two or more terms 
as supervisor of his township, and for some 
years was a member of the school board. 
His extensive travels have brought him in 
contact with all classes of people, and while 
the time spent in the school room was com- 
paratively short, he is yet a well-informed 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORI 



man. The difference existing between the 
present time and that in which he was a 
stage driver, can hardly be conceived, but 
in the development of the country he has 
borne no inconsiderable part. 



LEWIS P. HIX, editor and proprietor of 
the Sycamore City Weekly, is a nati\e 
of De Kalb county, born near the city of 
Sycamore, June 29, 186S. His father, 
Volaski Hi.x, was born April 25, 1837, in 
Clarendon, Orleans count}-. New York, and 
was the son of Ephraim and Laura W. (Will- 
iams) Hix. When eleven years of age he came 
with his parents to De Kalb county, his fa- 
ther purchasing one hundred and thirtj- 
acres of land in Kingston township, to which 
he subsequently added until his farm con- 
sisted of three hundred and thirty-seven 
acres. On that farm Volaski Hix grew to 
manhood and received a fair common- 
school education, supplemented by a few 
terms at Mt. Morris Seminary and Wheaton 
College. 

\'olaski Hix assisted his father in the 
work of the farm until after he attained his 
majority. He was united in marriage No- 
vember 17, 1864, with Miss Louisa Parker, 
a native of Hammond, Spencer county, In- 
diana, born May 9, 1843, and is the daugh- 
ter of Henry X. and Mary A. (Stillvvell) 
Parker, the former a native of Ontario 
county, New York, and the latter of Camp- 
bell county, Kentucky. They became the 
parents of five children— May, Lewis P., 
Eva L., Floyd, Arthur and Nellie, the lat- 
ter dying in infancy. 

Previous to and after his marriage Vo- 
laski Hix engaged in agricultural pursuits in 
connection with teaching. For some years, 
however, he had cherished the desire to en- 



gage in newspaper work. In 1871 the de- 
sire was consummated and he established 
the De Kalb County Farmer, which he pub- 
lished monthly. In 1872 the paper was suc- 
ceeded by the Sycamore City Weekly, which 
rapidly grew in public favor. At first it was 
independent in politics, but in 1876 it sup- 
ported the Republican national and state 
ticket, since which time the paper has been 
a strong supporter of the Republican prin- 
ciples. As a local paper it took front rank, 
giving special attention to the collection 
and publication of local news gathered 
throughout the county. Progressive in his 
ideas he gave support and encouragement to 
every enterprise calculated to build up his 
adopted count)-. He was especially inter- 
ested in agriculture and was for some years 
and until his death secretary of the De 
Kalb County Farmers' Picnic Association. 
He was unambitious politically and unpre- 
tending, giving his time to the building up 
of his paper and the advancement of the 
county. He died April 20, 1S93. His 
widow- is yet living in Sycaniore. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, 
Ephraim Hix, was born December 9, 1803, 
while his great-grandfather, Ephraim Hix, 
Sr. , -was born November 6, 1768. The fam- 
ily were originally from England. Ephraim 
Hix, Jr., was a very successful farmer and 
succeeded in accumulating a large property. 
He died on the old farm in Kingston town- 
ship January 13, 1863. His wife survived 
him some years and died at her residence in 
Sycamore, June 14, 1875. 

Lewis P. Hix, the subject of this sketch, 
grew to manhood in Sycamore, and w^as 
educated in its public schools. At an early 
age he entered the office of his father's pa- 
per to learn the trade and also the business 
of newspaper pulilic^ition. He made lapid 



98 



THE I'.IOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



l)roj;iess in the %arious branches cunnected 
with the printing and publishinj^ of a news- 
|.)aper. and in 1887 he became a partner 
witli his father, under the tirni name of Hi\ 
cV Son. That linn name has been retained 
sine.' the .leath of tlic father. 

On the ,:;olh ..I |annar\, 1 Syo, Mr. Hi.x 
was united in iiiairia-.- with Mi^s I)..ra 
Hopisi.is. dau.uhter .d hldward an,l X'esla M. 
(Johnsoni Hopkins. Sh.' was b<.rn in 1 )e 
Kalb cninily, of which iier parents were 
earl\ settlers. Her father was a brother of 
Hun. A. J. Hnpkins, the present member 
of congress from the district of which De 
Kalb county is a part. 

Under the management of its present 
proprietor the S\camore City \\'eekl\- main- 
tains tlie excellent reputation established b\' 
its founder. It is a six-column quarto, neatly 
printed and abl\- conducted. It is a strong 
Republican paper and a stanch ad\ocate of 
the principles of that party. A job office is 
connected with the e.stablishment. Fra- 
ternally, Mr. Hi.x is a member of the Knights 
of Pvthias. 



DUANE J. CARXES, senior member 
of the law firm of Carnes & Dunton, 
.^ycairiore, Illinois, is niunbered among the 
leading attorneys of northern Illinois. It 
is said that the poet is born, not made. 
The successful lawyer has to be both born 
and made — made b\- close application, 
earnest effort, perseverance and resolute 
purpose. The abilities with which nature 
has endowed him have to be strengthened 
and developed by use, and only by merit 
can the lawyer gain a pre-eminent position. 
Mr. Carnes was born at Pomfret, Wind- 
sor county, \'ermont, Ma_\- 27, 184S, and is 
the son of John and Mary Warren (Paine) 



Carnes, the former a native of Claremont, 
New Hampshire, born Ma\- 30, 1823. His 
father, also nacned John, was from the 
northern part of Ireland, and came to the 
United States about 1815, locating in Clare- 
mont, New Hampshire. He was a man of 
means and a wea\-er b)- trade, and started a 
woolen null at that place of considerable 
magnitude for those days. He later located 
at Lowell, Massachusetts, where he was 
engaged in the same business. His wife 
was Persia Whitmore. They had two 
chiKJren, Cliarlotte and John. The former 
married James Parker, who subsequently 
located in Mayfield township, De Kalb 
county, Illinois, where he engaged in farm- 
ing until 1875, when his death occurred. 
His widow survived him a few years. 

John Carnes, the father of our subject, 
was reared to farm life, and came to Syca- 
more in 1875, where he carried on farming 
in a small way near the city, and where he 
still resides. He brought with him to this 
country a considerable sum of mone_\', which 
he invested in various ways, principally in 
loans. His wife was a native of Pomfret, 
\'ermont, born July 4, 1825. Her father 
was Moses Paine, also a native (jf Pomfret, 
born in 1780, and the sou of .\sa Paine, 
who was likewise a native of Pomfret, Con- 
necticut. His wife was Keziah Childs, a 
Pomfret, Connecticut, woman. Mary War- 
ren Carnes was a niece of Hooper \\'arren, 
who came west at an earl\- day, and was a 
noted anti-slavery editor and temperance 
agitator. To John and Mary W. Carnes 
two children were born, Duane [. and 
George D. The latter is a physician in 
South Haven, Michigan. 

The primary education of our subject 
was in the district schools of Pomfret. He 
then entered the State Normal School at 




DUANE J. CARNES. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Randolph, Vermont, from which he was 
j^raduated when t\vent\- years old. He then 
came west and settled at Lincoln. Logan 
county, Illinois, where he engaged in teach- 
ing. He taught there from the fall of 1868 
until the spring of 1869, during which time 
he pursued his law studies, a part of the 
time in the law office of William Jones, of 
Lincoln. Returning to \'ermont, he fin- 
ished his second course in the Normal 
school at Randolph, and in the fall of 1873 
came to De Kalb county, Illinois, where he 
taught school for a time and continued his 
law studies in the office of Hon. Charles 
Kellum. 

In 1875, Mr. Carnes passed an e.xami- 
nation and was admitted to the bar, begin- 
ning his practice in partnership with Judge 
Kellum, which partnership continued two 
years. Later he formed a partnership with 
Judge Lowell, which lasted about si.\ years. 
When Mr. Lowell went on the bench, Mr. 
Carnes formed a partnership with Gilbert 
H. Denton, which continued till the fall of 
1889, when it was dissolved, and a partner- 
ship with George W. Dunton was formed, 
since which time the firm of Carnes & Dun- 
ton has been in e.xistence. 

Mr. Carnes was married June i, iSSo, 
to Helen A. McMollan, daughter nf Archi- 
bald and Ellen (Black) McMollan, both 
natives of Scotland, and after marriage 
came to the United States and located in 
New ^'ork, later moving to Ogle county, 
Illinois. He died in 1876, and his wife in 
1885, at Oregon, Illinois. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Carnes one child was born, Hope, who 
yet resides with her parents. Religiously 
Mrs. Carnes is a member of the Presbyte- 
rian church. Fraternally he is a Mason, 
ha\-ingtaken the Rojal Arch degree. Politic- 
ally he is a Republican. His law^ practice 



has been such as to preclude his giving 
much time to politics or to aspire to any 
office. Lor several years he has been local 
attorney for the Illinois Central Railroad, 
and in special cases has been attornex' (or 
other roads. 

Mr. Carnes is a ripe jurist and an able 
advocate. After his admission to the bar 
he rose rapidly to the front in his profes- 
sion, and with his partners, has been asso- 
ciated in nearly all the important cases 
since he began his practice that have come 
before the De Kalb county bar. He is 
found in the trial of most of the criminal 
cases in the county, either in prosecution or 
defense. He makes such cases a study, and 
finds in them problems in human nature, 
where his analytical mind has full play and 
serves him well. His special forte as a law- 
yer is as an advocate, and he rarely fails to 
bring the minds of the jury to his cause. 
When before the court or jury, he always 
commands the closest attention. He pos- 
sesses a fund of humor withal, and his 
quaint sayings, apt illustrations and similies 
are not the least attractive feature of his 
legal oratory. In his profession he has 
been a success, and holds the esteem, not 
only of the bench and bar, but of the peo- 
ple. He is possessed of fine instincts, char- 
itable and kind to the deserving, of pleasant 
manners, and an attractive conversation- 
alist. 



EDWIN JESSEN, foreman of the paint- 
ing and dipping department in the 
EUwood Manufacturing Company, Pleasant 
Street, De Kalb county, Illinois, resides in 
a pleasant and commodious home which he 
erected for himself in the city of Sycamore, 
where he also owns other valuable lots. He 



THE HIOGKAPHICAL RECORD. 



father 
years, 



reared 



is a native of De Kalb, born Jane 3 
1864, ami is tine son of Jess and Helei 
lessen, wlio immigrated from Denmarl< tf 
this country in 1863, locatim; in De Kali) 
Illinois, where they resided a few years 
then moved to Michigan, whert: tht 
died. His wife survived him a fe\\- 
dying in Sycamore, June 13, 1893. 

'l"he subject of this sketch was 
and educated principally in De Ivalb, Illinois. 
At the age of fifteen, he began to work for 
the Ellwoods, in the paint shop at Syca- 
more, and has since continued the work for 
the same firm for eighteen years, several 
years of which time he has been foreman of 
the paint shop. On the 25th of January, 
1893, he married Miss Emma Ross, who 
was born in 1870, in Mayfield township, and 
who is a daughter of Peter Ross, an earl}- 
settler of De Kalb county. By this union 
there is onechdd, Archie Wilmer. 

Eaitlilulness has been one of the charac- 
teristics of onr subject, and by doing well 
whatever work was intrusted to him, he won 
not only the esteem of his employers, but 
secured the confidence of his fellow citizens, 
who elected hini tu the office of alderman of 
Sycamore, in which position he served two 
years. b'raternall)- he is a member of the 
Modern Woodmen of America, and in social 
life he is gieatly esteemed, ha\ing the man- 
ners of H true gentleman. 



ISRAEL R. WHITEMAN, deceased, was 
1 for some years one of the leading farmers 
in DeKalb township. He was born in Del- 
aware county, Ohio, in 1832, and was the 
son of John and Sarah Whiteman, also na- 
tives of Ohio, who removed to this county 
in 1846. .\fter their arrival, John White- 
man, the father, purchased one hundred and 



si.xty acres of land, which after a time he 
sold to good advantage, buying another 
tract west of the city, near where stands 
the present new normal school building. 
This, too, was put on ths market in due 
time, and realized to its owner a large prof- 
it. In 1872 he purchased another farm on 
which he remained during the rest of his life, 
dying in December, 1876, at the age o{ 
seventy-four years. His wife survives him, 
and has now reached the advanced age of 
ninety-nine j'ears. 

Israel R. Whiteman was only si.x years 
of age when he accompanied his parents to 
De Kalb county. Here he spent the remain- 
der of his life, with the exception of ten 
years in Chicago, as foreman for Mr. Beers. 
Even at that time, and notwithstanding his 
father's remo\al to Michigan, he yet claimed 
De Kalb as his home. On the 17th of June, 
1858, he married Miss Ellen A. Price, born 
near Cooperstown, New York, July 28, 1830, 
and the daughter of David and Polly Price, 
who removed from New York to St. Charles, 
Illinois, in 1844. Da\id Price was a man 
of good repute among his fellows, and for 
fifty years was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, during which time he 
held the office of class leader and other of- 
ficial positions. For four years he was 
keeper of the county-house at De Kalb, dis- 
charging the duties of the position in a most 
faithful manner. In early life he was known 
as Captain Price, having been captain of 
militia in his native state. His interesting 
family consisted of Lorenzo, Marie, Miner- 
va, Juliette and Ellen. By the union of 
Mr. Whiteman and Ellen Price, two children 
were born, Frances M., born October 26, 
1856, died April 30, 1864, and Minnie Grace, 
born September 16, 1866, who married 
Charles Graham and is a resident of Chicago. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



103 



While Mr. Whiteman was by occupation 
a farmer, he was also a natural mechanic,- 
and at one time invented a machine for 
making barb-wire fence. He was a leading 
spirit in the organization of the Whiteman 
Manufacturing Compan}-, of Marsailles, La- 
Salle county, Illinois, with a capital of thirty 
thousand dollars, which organization was 
later dissolved, on account of the death of 
Mr. Whiteman. His death was immedi- 
ately caused by being run over by a vehicle 
in Chicago, resulting in complications which 
finally caused his death, .\ugust 2- , 1888, 
at the age of fifty-five years. Fraternally 
he was a member of the Masons, and was 
always considered a trustworthy man, in the 
various relations of life, one held in the 
highest esteem by all who knew him. 



SAMUEL M. SANDERSON, who resides 
on section 39, Milan township, is the 
owner of one hundred and sixty acres of well 
improved land, which is kept under the high- 
est state of cultivation. He was born in 
La Salle county, Illinois, July 31, 1853, 
and is the son of Sander H. Sanderson, a 
native of Norway, who came to the United 
States with his father, Henry Sanderson, 
who located in La Salle county. Illinois, be- 
ing among the first of the Norwegian nation- 
ality to locate in that county. 

Samuel H. Sanderson was the oldest of a 
family of six children, all of whom had to 
walk the greater part of the way from Chi- 
cago to La Salle county. In that county 
he married Ann Moland, a native of Nor- 
way, who came to this country in childhood. 
The occupation which Mr. Sanderson en- 
gaged in La Salle county was that of a farm- 
er, and on his removal to De Kalb county, 
in 1863, he continued that vocation, pur- 



chasing eighty acres of unimproved land, to 
which he later added another eighty acres, 
giving him a fine farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres of excellent prairie land. He 
became quite a prominent man in Milan 
township, and served some ten years as jus- 
tice of the peace, and also held other official 
positions. He was ver\- helpful to the Nor- 
wegians settling in his neighborhood and 
did them many a good turn. He died in 
Milan township in 1883, while his wife pre- 
ceded him only about one week. 

Samuel M.Sanderson was second in order 
of birth in the family of fi\e sons and four 
daughters, who grew to mature years, all of 
wiiom are yet fixing and are married; one, 
Ole, died in infancy. He was reared in 
De Kalb county, and educated in the com- 
mon schools, attending during the winter 
months, and assisting in the farm work at 
other seasons of the years. He remained 
with his father until after he reached his 
majorit} , and later formed a partnership 
with him and engaged in the general mer- 
cantile business at Lee for five years, during 
which time he received a good busines's 
training. 

In La Salle county. Illinois. September 
10, 1874, Dr. Sanderson was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Betsey K. Halverson. a na- 
tive of La Salle county, and a daughter of 
Knute Halverson, a native of Norway and 
likewise one of the early Norwegians locat- 
ing in La Salle county. Immediately after 
his marriage, Mr. Sanderson rented a farm 
and later purchased eighty acres where he 
now resides, and on which he added eighty 
acres adjoining, making him a fine farm of 
one hundred and sixty acres. The place 
was partially icnproved when he purchased, 
but he has remodeled the house and erected 
various outbuildings, and is now one of the 



104 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



most successful farmers in the township. 
He is also a stockholder, secretary and man- 
ager of the Lee Creamery Association, an 
enterprise which has been quite successful. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Sanderson t\\elve chil- 
dren have been born. si.\ of whom died 
in infancy and early childhood. The living 
are Harvey C. , Sander E., Eva A., Kinnie 
O., Lester E. and Vira M. Politically Mr. 
Sanderson is a Republican, and has given 
his support to that party since 1S76. He 
has taken quite an active part in local poli- 
tics, and was elected and served one term 
as township collector, and in 1895 was 
elected supervisor of his township, and re- 
elected in 1898, and is now serving his 
second term. He has made a very faithful 
and efficient officer, rendering complete sat- 
isfaction to his constituents. His influence 
has always been in favor of good schools, 
and to that end he has given much of his 
time as a member of the school board, and 
clerk tjf his school district. He and his 
wife are earnest and consistent members of 
the Lutheran church. His life has been an 
actne one, and his friends are many, not 
only in .Milan township, but throughout De- 
kalb and Lee counties. 



PETER \-AX ALLEN OUILHOT, of 
Sliabbona, Illinois, is a highly esteemed 
citizen of the county, who dates his resi- 
dence here since June 11, 1S45. He is a 
native of Cayuga county. New York, born 
in the town of Victory, January 21. 1822. 
On his father's side he is of French ancestry, 
his great-grandfather. Dr. Ouilhot, being a 
native of France and a surgeon in the 
French Navy. He was taken prisoner by 
the British, during the French and English 
war of 1765, and was later paroled in New 



York, and settled in Columbia county. He 
married, in New York, a Miss Vanderpool, a 
native of Holland, a member of one of the 
pioneer families of New York, from that 
count}-. His son, James Ouilhot, was born 
in Columbia count}'. Henry (Uiilhot, the 
son of James Ouilhot, was the father of our 
subject. He was born in the town of 
Kinderhook, Columbia county. New York, 
in 1789. He grew to manhood irt his native 
county and served in the war of 1812. In 
1817 he moved to Cayuga, being one of its 
first settlers. Before moving to that county, 
he was married, in Kinderhook, to Miss 
Hannah Van Allen, also a native of that 
place, but of Holland parentage, the \'an 
Aliens beingamong the pioneers of Columbia 
county. On his removal to Cayuga county 
he opened up a farm and there spent the 
last years of his life, dying September 11, 
1S28, when about forty years of age. He 
was a very vigorous and active man, and took 
pride in doing more work than any other 
one man could do. In one day he cradled 
seven acres of rye, which brought on a con- 
gestive chill, the cause of his death. His 
wife survived him and passed away in Shab- 
bona township, De Kalb county. May 20, 
1867. 

The subject of this sketch is the seventh 
in the family of ten children born to his 
parents, all of whom grew to mature years. 
James, born in Kinderhook, in 1809, married 
in Columbus, Ohio, where he located and 
where his wife died. He was a soldier in 
the United States Army, was taken sick, 
and died in the hospital at Governor's isl- 
and, about 1848. Myndert \'. , also born in 
Kinderhook, in 181 1, married in New York, 
came to Kalb county, in 1853, and here 
died. Catherine, born in 1813, married 
Daniel Husk, who has since died. She now 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL Ri:COKD. 



105 



resides in Buffalo, New York. Elizabeth, 
born ill i^iii, married Peter Miller, and 
they now reside in the town of Shabbona. 
Maria married Nicholas I. Kipple, of Ren- 
ssellaer county, New York. They came 
west in 1849, settled in De Kalb county, 
where her death occurred. Margaret 
married Henry Kirkpatrick, and settled in 
Kansas; she died May 12, 1897, in Shabbona. 
Peter V. is the subject of this review. Jane 
married Hiram P Allen, who was murdered 
in Sandwich, Illinois, February 15, 1880. 
Mrs. Allen now resides in Chicago. Cornel- 
ius \'., who came to De Kalb county in 
1849, now resides in Shabbona, li\'ing a 
retired life. Caroline married William 
Marks. Jr., and settled in De Kalb county in 
1845, and both are now deceased. 

The subject of this sketch grew to man- 
hood, in Cayuga county. New York, and re- 
ceived his education in the common schools, 
supplemented by an attendance at Red 
Creek Academy. He remained on the farm 
for some years, after attaining his majority, 
then commenced to learn the painter's 
trade. After the first year he received 
journeyman's wages, having become an e.\- 
pert painter. That trade he followed until 
he came west in 1845. Leaving home he 
came by way of Erie canal to Buffalo, and 
thence by the lakes to Chicago, being ac- 
companied by his sister and brother-in-law. 
They came direct to De Kalb county and 
located in Shabbona township, and the fol- 
lowing year our subject entered a tract of 
go\-ernment land, comprising one hundred 
and twenty acres. When he went to get 
his first deed recorded, in 1846, he rode an 
Indian pony across the prairie to Sycamore, 
and as the old frame court house had not 
been inclosed by a fence he rode right up 
to the door of the s;ime. In that \ear he 



sowed twelve acres of wheat on the farm of 
a Mr. Miller. In 1 S47 he returned to Cay- 
uga county. New York, and worked at his 
trade for several months. In October, 1848, 
he again came to De Kalb county, and in 
the spring of 1849 built a small frame 
house, for whic'fj he obtained the siding and 
finished lumber in Chicago. He at once 
commenced to improve the place, and in 
1854 purchased eighty acres adjoining, on 
which he later moved. In 1S63 he built a 
large and substantial residence, erected a 
barn and other outbuildings, thus putting 
the place in a homelike condition. He con- 
tinued to culti\ate the farm until 1884. 
when he rented the place, and four years 
later removed to the \illage of Shabbona, 
where he has since lived a retired life. In ad- 
dition to his De Kalb county farm, he owns 
two hundred acres in Morris county, Kan- 
sas. Mr. Ouilhot was married in Somonauk, 
De Kalb county, August 8, 1850, to Miss 
Frances M. Bacon, a native of Onondago 
county, New "\'ork, where she was reared 
and educated, and a daughter of Lyman 
Bacon, one of the early settlers of De Kalb 
county and one of the first members of the 
county board of supervisors. He was a 
native of New York, and tlierc married, 
coming from Onondago county to De Kalb 
county, Illinois, in 1840. By this union 
there are si.\ children. John J. married, in 
1879, Fannie Burchard, and the}' now re- 
side on the old home farm. Henry Bacon 
is a farmer residing in Morris county, Kan- 
sas; he married ,-\lice Prescott, of Kansas, 
in Februar)', 1876. Helen E. is now the 
wife of Richard K. Anderson, and they now 
reside in F'ort Scott, Kansas. Josephine 
married John A. Swett, and they reside in 
Harvey, Illinois, where he is employed as 
station agent. Franklin \'. married Miss 



io6 



THE BIOr.RAPIIICAL RECORD. 



Ida Pattnn, ami they reside in Chicago, 
wiierr he ii^ engaged in the grncer_\- busi- 
ness. IjIh Sarah married Henry Louci<s, 
and th(.'y reside in \'ictor township, De 
Kalb county, where he is engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits. 

Politically Mr. Ouilhot is a stanch Re- 
publican, having voted for every presiden- 
tial nominee of the party from Fremont to 
McKinley. His first presidential ballot, 
however, was cast for James K. Polk. He 
has been honored by his fellow citizens 
with various local offices, being elected 
highvva\ commissioner on the organization 
of his townshi}>, and later ser\-ed as assessor 
at different times. In 1862, he was first 
elected as a member of the board of county 
supervisors, and at different times has 
ser\ed seven terms. In 18S3, he was chair- 
man of important (ommittees and has 
served on almost all the important commit- 
tees of the board. While he did not enter 
the ser\ice during the Civil war, he showed 
his patriotism and intere.st in the cause by 
contributing to the support of rhe families 
of \olimteers and m raising the bounties 
required to till the (juota of his township. 
He gave full} twenty per cent, of the 
amount contributed by the entire township 
of the first ca.sh subscription and also con- 
tributed liberally for other purposes. For 
two years and a half of the war he gave 
much of his time in affording relief to sol- 
diers' families of the volunteers. He per- 
forcned Narious duties pertaining to the en- 
hstment of recruits without remuneration. 

Mrs. Ouilhot is a member of the Con- 
gregational church, and while not a mem- 
ber himself, Mr. ( Juilhot attends the church 
with his wife and gives of his means to 
lis support. Fraternally he is a member of 
Shabb.uia Eodge, No. ,,74, .\. E. .S: .\. M., 



having united with the order in 1863. For 
twenty-five consecuti\'e years he has served 
as treasurer of the lodge. Mr. Ouilhot 
has been a resident of Illinois for more than 
half a century. When he came there were 
but fifteen families in Shabbona township, 
and old Shabbona was his neighbor. The 
Indians resided in the neighborhood until 
the fall of 1849, when they went to a reser- 
vation in Kansas. Mr. Ouilhot is well 
known throughout De Kalb county, and is 
held in the highest esteem by all. 



7'HOMAS J. WINDERS, editor and pro- 
prietor of the Malta Record and Cres- 
ton Observer, makes his home in the for- 
mer place, and is recognized as one who 
has the best interests of his adopted county 
at heart, always ready to advocate any 
measure that will advance the best interests 
of the community. He was born in Xeva- 
daville, Colorado, January 20, 1863, and is 
the son of John N. and Susan (Powell) 
\\'inders, both natives of Washington coun- 
ts, Maryland, born about 1 83 1. The fa- 
ther was a civil engineer b}' profession, and 
removed from his southern home to Polo, 
Illinois, in 1855, where he engaged in the 
grain business for several years. He sub- 
sequently removed to St. Joseph, Missouri, 
with his family, and there remained about 
two years, going from thence to Nevada- 
ville, Colorado, where he engaged in min- 
ing. 

The subject of this sketch remained 
under the parental roof until in his sev- 
enth year, when he came to Ogle county, 
and after atten ling the common schools for 
a time, entered the normal school at \'al' 
paraiso, Indiana. He also took a course in 
.Aument's Business College at Sterling. Illi- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



107 



nois, concludin,? his studies at Ndrthern 
Illinois College. Fulton. Illinois 

On leaving school, Mr. U'inders removed 
to Iowa where he engaged in the printing 
business, remaining there until 1SS7, when 
he removed to Chicago, in which city he 
engaged in like business until 1894. In 
the spring of 1894 he returned to Polo, 
Ogle county, Illinois, and in the fall of the 
same year purchased a halt interest in the 
Malta Record and Creston Obser\er, be- 
coming associated with L. L. O'Kane. In 
February, 1895, he purchased the interest 
of Mr. O'Kane and became sole proprietor 
of the papers. At that time the plant was 
at Creston, but in the fall ot 1895 he re- 
moved it to Malta. In March, 1897, he 
formed a partnership with F. E. Campbell, 
which continued one year, when he re-pur- 
chased and again became sole proprietor. 

On the I 5th of July, 1896, Mr. Winders 
was united in marriage with Mrs. Alice A. 
Chapell, widow of the late Clarence E. 
Chapell. He and his wife are members of 
the Congregational church, uniting in 1 8q''> 
under the pastorate of Rev. S. S. Unger. 
They are both active workers in the church 
and in the Young People's Society of Chris- 
tian Endeavor. Mr. Winders is now serv- 
ing as trustee and usher in the church. Po- 
litically he is a Republican and has been an 
active worker in the interest of the party, 
advocating its principles with voice and pen, 
and often serving as delegate to the various 
conventions including congressional and 
state. 

Mr. \\'inders is a popular man and his 
companionship is sought by various socie- 
ties. He is a member of the Modern Wood- 
men of America, at Malta, of which he was 
clerk in 1897. He is a charter member of 
the Mvstic Workers of the World, and hns 



been secretary of the (jrder since its organi- 
zation. January 1 1, iS()6. He is a charter 
member of the Knights of Pythias at Malta, 
of which he has been keeper of the records 
and seals since March 25, 1896. He is also 
a charter member of the Knights of the 
Globe at Malta, and at the date of its or- 
ganization he was elected judge and one of 
the board of managers, and is now past su- 
preme judge. He is a member of the En- 
dowment Rank (if the Insurance order of 
the Knights of Pythias. In each of these 
organizations he has taken an actixe inter- 
est and is an iTitluential member. 



WILLIAM A. r.UEHL, a well-known 
business man of Sycamore, Illinois, 
was born in Buffalo, New York, June 5, 
1857, and is the son of Louis A. and Sophia 
(Ludvvig) Buehl, both of whom are natives 
of Germany. The father was born near 
Heidelberg, January 13, 1827. At the age 
of seventeen he came to .America, leaving 
in time to escape forced ser\ice in the 
army. For a time he made his home in 
New York Cit}-, where he married and 
where several of his children were born. 
He was for some years captain of one ol 
the crews of engines connected with the 
tire department, under the old ri-o-,'„ic\ 
where jealousies were rife and tights fre- 
quent between rival crews at fires. On one 
of the occasions, he was struck on the back 
of his head with a speaking trumpet, and 
was unable to discharge his duties while 
that fire continued. Frequently the rival 
crews would turn the stream upon each 
other instead of upon the flames. About 
1854, he removed to Buffalo, and some 
time later he became interested in the man- 
ufacture iif shoes, at one time ha\ing the 



I OS 



THl': lUOCRAPIIirAl. KlvCOKl). 



largest shoe store in Buffalo. He was a 
a great traveler and trax'ersed the greater 
part of Europe and America. During the 
Civil war, he enlisted in the United States 
service, hut the war closed beforehe reached 
the front. .About 1S72 he retired from 
active business, and took life easy until his 
death, April 1, 18S7. His wife was horn 
May 10, 1.S27, in Hohenberg, Kcenigfalz, 
Bavaria, (iermauy, and came to America 
with her parents, the voyage lasting forty- 
se\en days. To Lewis A. and Sophia 
])Uehl six suns and one daughter were 
born, the latter .lying at the age of fifteen 
years. The five brothers of our suliject yet 
reside in Buffalo, where they are engaged 
in business. 

The early life of our subject was spent 
in his n.-.tive citw where he attended school 
No. 13, Oak street, Buffalo, until the age 
of fourteen. Like many others, he regrets 
quitting so soon, but he was ambitious to 
get to earning his own living, He was ap- 
prenticedto a company of manufacturing jew- 
elers, with wh(jm he worked four years, then 
learned watch-making, at which he worked 
until coining west in 1S78. He located first 
at Appleton, Wisconsin, where he engaged in 
manufacturing jewelry and doing repair 
work, .\fter remaining there some five or 
si.\ \ears, he moved to Rockford, Illinois, 
where he engaged in the same business for 
about fifteen months. He then sold out 
and for eight months traveled in California 
for the benefit of his son's health. 

Mr. Buehl was married in Loomis, Mich- 
igan, Jtdy 27, 1879, to Miss Annie Ostran- 
der, born in Howard township, proNince of 
Ontario, Canada, and a daughter of James 
and Sarah ('Gosnelh Ostrander. By this 
union four children have been born — Buelah, 
Kussell, Willie and I'arris. Of these WiUie 



is now deceased. The family are attend- 
ants of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Fraternally Mr. Buehl is a Mason, and a 
member of the Knights of Pythias, Modern 
Woodmen of America and National Union. 
On returning to Illinois, Mr. Buehl came 
to Sjcamore, purchased a jewelry store, and 
continued in business until the spring of 
1898, when he sold his store in order to 
give his entire time and attention to the 
manufacture and introduction of the insu- 
lating apparatus, invented by his friend, G. 
G. Lewis, with whom he is in partnership 
in the patent. Of these patents there are 
four in number. The first was constructed 
on the plan to pump the insulating liquid up 
to the wires. This worked well on low 
wires, but was not satisfactory on wires forty 
or fifty feet from the ground. Another ar- 
rangement on the same principle was pat- 
ented, but that likewise was found defec- 
tive. A third was constructed, with a bo.x 
to slide along the wires, which principle was 
found to be the correct one, and a fourth 
machine was constructed and patented, 
which has overcome all objections and 
meets all contingencies and conditions. 
After coating the wires of a plant in a neigh- 
boring town, the electric compan\' noticed a 
saving of fuel on the first day. The appli- 
ance not only saves leakage of electricity 
from the wires, but preser\es the insulation 
for many years. One commendable feature 
of the process is its cheapness. Having 
perfected the idea, Buehl & Lewis are giving 
their attention tn introducing it to the pub- 



CAPTAIX ALMON FORI) PARKE re- 
sides upon a fine farm in sections 7, 8 
and y. Sycamore township. Fie was born 




CAPT. A. F. PARKE. 



THE BI0(;RAPHICAL RKC-()kl). 



in the town of Evans, Erie county. New 
York, Januar}- 25. 1838. and is the son of 
Larmon Z. and Martha \\'. (Fenton) Parke, 
the former born in i Soo, and the latter in 
1799. The paternal ;,;randfather, Reuben 
Parke, was born June 10, 177-. and died in 
Indiana, when about ninety )eai3 old: He 
married Elizabeth R. l'\)rd, a daughter of 
Ahnond Ford, a captain in the war of 1812, 
for whom our subject was named. She 
was born in Connecticut and buried in Do 
Ivalb, and was buried on her ninet\--fifth 
birthday. t.armon Z. I^arke was a car- 
penter and joiner and fnllowed that trade 
until compelled to i,Mvt; it up, when he 
learned the trade of a mason; was a tine 
mason and followed that until he recei\'ed a 
stroke of paralysis, durinj^ the war. He 
resided on a small farm near De Kalb for 
many years. His death occurred Septem- 
ber 14, 18185, in De Kalb where he was then 
residing. 

The subject of this sketch attended the 
district schools in his native count}' and 
state, until the a^^e of eighteen years, in 
the meantime assisting in the farm work 
during the summer months. The family 
resided about eighteen nn'les from liuffalo, 
to which ciiy he hauled the farm prtjduce. 
In 1856 he accompanied his parents west, 
the famil}- locating in De Kalb township. 
He attended the De Kalb High School, and 
also one term at Mt. Morris Seminary, 
which completed his school life. He then 
taught school for one term. His father fol- 
lowing the trade of a mason, all the sons 
were required to learn the same trade, and 
were good masons, before attaining their 
inajorit)'. Our subject learned not only the 
brick and stone mason trade, but also plas- 
tering. When twenty years old, he hired 
his time from his father, and followed ma- 



sonry on his nwn account until the seconrl 
year of the Civil war. doing his last work 
in the fall of 1862, on a school-house in De 
Kalb. 

l^jelieving that it was his duly to assist 
his coiintr>', Mr. Parke assisted m raising a 
company, and was mustered into the servicc 
at Di.von, IlliiKiis, September 2, 1802, as 
second lieutenant of Company K, One- 
Hundred and P"ifth Illinois \'olunteer In- 
fantry. With his regiment he was sent to 
Camp Douglass, Chicago, from which place 
it was sent to I,ouisville, Frankfort and 
I^jowling Green, Kentucky, thence to Nash- 
ville, and wintered at South Tunnel, near 
the latter city. \\'hile in camp at South 
Tunnel, Lieutenant Parke was taken sick 
with t\ phoid fever, from which he suf- 
fered two months. ^^'hen con\-alescent, 
he was assigned to duty with the pioneer 
corps and sent to Murphysborough. Within 
three months after being mustered into 
the service, our subject was promoted first 
lieutenant, and while on diit\- with the 
pioneer corps, the captain of his company 
resigned, when he was commissioned cap- 
tain, and ordered back to take command of 
his company. 

Soon after receiving his commission as 
captain, our subject joined his compau}- at 
Nashville, and reported for dnt\ . From 
Nashville, with his regiment, he went tn 
the Wauhatchie N'alley, and in the spring 
of 1864 entered on the Atlanta Campaign. 
He was in every battle tiuring that cam- 
paign, but never was wounded, although 
shcjt through the coat, and his scabbard 
once struck with a minie ball, .\fter the 
.\tlanta campaign, the Twentieth Arm\ 
Corps, of which the One Hundred and Fifth 
Illinois Regiment formed a part, was given 
a rist at Atlanta. The father of Captain 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Parke having received a stroke of paral}'sis, 
the Captain secured a leave of absence and 
returned home for seven days. On return- 
ing to his regiment, he found that it had 
gone on the inarch to the sea. He got as 
far as Xa5li\'ille, tiien went to Chattanooga, 
but could not get through. He was then 
assigned t<j the command of a company at 
Nashville, and for a time was under 
General Thomas, and later under General 
Harrison. After Sherman reached the sea. 
Captain Parke was relieved from duty in 
Tennessee, where he had been serving on 
the military commission, trying criminal 
cases. When the commission was dissolved, 
he received an order to report to his com- 
mand at Raleigh, North Carolina. While 
til route upon the ocean, he learned of 
Lincoln's assassination at Morehead City, 
passing boats having their flags at half mast. 
From Raleigh his regiment marched through 
Virginia on its way to Washington, and our 
subject had a glimpse of Libby Prison, and 
saw many of the battlefields of the Eastern 
Army. After the Grand Review, in which 
it participated, his regiment was ordered to 
Chicago where it was mustered out of serv- 
ice June 7, 1865. 

On being mustered out, Captain Parke 
returned home and resumed his trade in 
De I\alb, and later in partnership with a 
brother, who owned one hundred and si.xty 
acres, he purchased eighty acres of land 
on Section 33, Afton township, nine miles 
south of De Kalb. He continued at his 
trade, however, until about 1869, when, 
with his brother, he bought another farm 
in Afton township, on sections i and 12, 
and in connection with his trade followed 
farming until 1870, when the partnership 
with his brother was dissolved, and he con- 
tinued in possession of the farm. In 1871 



he mo\-ed to the farm in Afton township, 
where he resided until February, 1873, 
when he came to his present farm, at that 
time consisting of two hundred and forty 
acres. In 1S84 he built a residence forty 
by forty-four feet, and twenty-si.x feet in 
height. The building is a brick with hard- 
wood finish, and a large tank in the garret 
supplied water for the entire house. On 
the place is a model Ijarn, thirty-four by 
one hundred and two feet. Since taking- 
possession of the farm. Captain Parke has 
put down about three miles of tilings, set 
out orchard trees which gives the place a 
beautiful appearance. 

Captain Parke was married September 
I, 1S70, to Miss Ruth Hall, who was born 
in a log house which is still standing, on a 
farm just north of our subject, in which the 
county court was once held. At the time 
it was built it was the largest and finest 
house in the county. She is a daughter of 
Ephraim Hall, born in Wallingsford, Con- 
necticut, March i^, 180S, and who came to 
De Kalb county in the fall of 1836. In his 
native state, he engaged in the manufacture 
of Britania ware. His death occurred in 
De Kalb county, within one week of the age 
of eighty-eight years. To our subject and 
wife seven children have been born, si.x of 
whom are yet living. Martha \\'. died at 
an early age. -Nelson K. is proprietor of a 
feed stable in Belvidere, Illinois. Henry 
H. is assistant curator of the Museum at 
the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He 
attended a school of embriology, at Wood's 
Hall, Massachusetts, in the summer of 
1898. Mary and Mila are graduates of the 
Sycamore High School, the latter being a 
teacher in the home district. Ruth and 
Eleanor G. are attending the high school in 
Sycamore. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



In politics Captain Parke is a Democrat. 
Fraternally he was fnrnierl\- a Mason, hold- 
ing membership ^vith the bine loH<;e and 
chapter. For abont twenty years he has 
served as a school director, and since living; 
in his present district has been clerk of the 
school board. He is one of the best fann- 
ers in De Kalb county, his farm slKjwinj^ 
evidence of thrift at e\er\' hand. 



DR. C. SCHUYLER, dentist, with ot^ce 
on the corner of Third and Main 
streets. De Kalb, Illinois, is one of the lead- 
ing dental practitioners of the county, none 
sustaining,' a higher reputation for skill and 
reliability. \\'hile he is a young man in 
years and practice, he is in the front nf his 
profession, being a thoroughly expert den- 
tist, both in the mechanical and surgical 
branches of the art. He is a graduate ol 
the Chicago College of Dental Surger\', and 
has been established in De Kalb, Illinois, 
since his graduation from that institution in 
1891. From the time that he first opened 
his office he has been steadily increasing his 
hold on popular fa^•or and patronage. His 
rooms are neat, well appointed, and fiir- 
nislied with approved dental appliances, 
enabling him to do work in the very best 
form of art. All operations comprehended 
in modern dentistry are performed in a 
superior manner, and satisfaction is guar- 
anteed in every instance. 

Dr. Schuyler was born in Xunica, Mich- 
igan, February 23, 1868, and is the son of 
James H. and Mary fSixbury) Schuyler, 
who were residents of Michigan at the time 
of the Doctor's birth. There his mother's 
death occurred, but the father subsequently 
removed to Sycamore, Illinois, where the 
Doctor received his tarly training and fitted 



himself for college. On the second of Sep- 
tember, 1896, he was united in marriage with 
Miss Harriet D. Cuoiirirh, iho accom- 
plished daughter (i| ICrastus and Phebe 
Goodrich. She is a native of New York, 
born in 1871, and came with her parents to 
DeKalb count}- in 1879. Here she grew 
to womanhood, and received her educa- 
tion. 

James H. Schuyler, the father of our 
subject, was united in marriage, at Syca- 
more, Illinois. May 9, 1866, with Miss Mary 
E. Sixburj-, and they sh(_irtl_\- afterwards 
removed to Nunica, Michigan, where two 
sons were born to them, Colfax, our sub- 
ject, and Jauies C. Mrs. Mary E. Schuy- 
ler was born at SycauK.irc, DeKalb county. 
May 30. 1838, and died at Xunira, Michi- 
gan, February 7, 1876. Mr. Schuyler 
afterwards marrie(J a second wife, h\ whom 
he had' one son. Joseph .'^ixhury, the father 
of .Mrs. .Mary E. Schuyler, was one of the pio- 
neers of Sycainore, locating in that place 
in 1837. He was one of the men who as- 
sisted in locating the county seat at Syca- 
more. Both he and his wife were devoted 
members of the MethiDdist Episcopal church, 
in which he held the office of class leader 
and steward for several years. He was born 
in .Amsterdam, Montgomery county. New 
York, November 7, 1810, and died at Syca- 
more, December 28, 1879. His wife was 
born at the same place, March 2, 18 15, and 
died in 1880. 



HON. WILLIAM M. B\ ERS, one of the 
old and prominent citizens of De Kalb 
countv, now residing in Sycamore, dates his 
residence from pioneer times, having come 



to the county in 1841, in company 



paren 



and has here 



ith hi 

imud li 



14 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



reside. He was born in Andes, Delaware 
county, New York, March 20, 1S21, and is 
the son cf James and Jane (Scott) Byers, 
both of whom were native of Dumfriesshire, 
Scotland, where they were married prior to 
their eniif^ration to this country. In his 
native land, James Byers was a herdel', an 
occupation which was not a very profitable 
one. Learning of the opportunities afforded 
the poor man in the United States, he 
determined to make that land his home. 
With his family, in 1818, he set sail and in 
due time landed in New \'ork, from which 
place he went to Delaware county, that 
state, where he purchased a farm of the 
Hardeiiburg patent, on which he resided for 
twenty-three \ ears. 

The great west was now being opened 
up for settlement, and the fame of the 
prairie state had penetrated the old state of 
New York, so he determined to sell out and 
move west, where the opportunities were 
still greater for advancement. In 1841, he 
sold his place in New York, and came direct 
to De Kalb countw Illinois, and took up a 
claim in what is now South Gro\e township, 
a tract of land which he afterwards pur- 
chased when it came into market. On this 
tract he built a residence and commenced 
its improvement, and there he continued to 
reside during the remainder of his life. He 
continued to give personal attention to the 
management of his farm, as long as age and 
health would permit, when he sold, but 
reserved a home interest during his life. 
He died December 10. 1874. 

During the existence of that party, 
James Byers was an old-line \Miig. A be- 
liever in the freedom of all mankind, he 
espoused the principles of the Republican 
party on its organization and continued to 
act with that party until the end. He was 



a leader amor.g the people, and held various 
official positions, being a justice of the peace 
for many years. During the administration 
of the elder Harrison he was appointed 
postmaster of South Grove, being the second 
incumbent of the office at that place. Phys- 
icall\' he was a man of good size, strongly 
■built and was usually in the enjoyment of 
the best of health. His wife died in 1873. 
They were the parents of si.x children — 
|ohn; William M., our subject; Christine, 
who married John Nichols; James; Asel B. ; 
and Jane, who died in childhood. Of this 
number, [ames and ths subject of this 
sketch are all that are living. 

\\'illiam M. B3ers was reared on the 
farm in Delaware county. New York, where 
he attended the common schools. He was 
not yet twenty-one when his parents came 
west. When of age he worked with his 
father in partnership, until he was twenty- 
eight years old, when he mo\ed to the farm, 
which had been purchased for him. in South 
Grove township, consisting of a quarter- 
section of land. At first he engaged in 
grain farming, and later went into stock and 
general farming. Soon after locating on his 
original farm, he purchased forty acres of 
raw prairie, after which he purchased one 
hundred acres adjoining his old farm. Later 
he added another hundred acres adjoining, 
and then purchased a quarter section in 
Malta township, which he fenced and culti- 
vated in connection with his other purchases. 
Soon after he purchased the first quarter- 
section of land, he then bought eighty acres. 
Later he bought an eighty and a forty-acre 
tract, that squared his first purchase. His 
next purchase was a quarter section in South 
Grove township, which he cultivated, after 
which he bought the old homestead of three 
hundred and ninety-seven acres. He then 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



115 



p;irchased thirty-five acres of timlKir laud 
adjoining his first purchase. He now owns 
upwards of one thousand acres, having oc- 
casionally sold small tracts from his posses- 
sions. His farms are now worked on the 
shares, \^'hen he was actively engaged in 
farming he made a specialt}- of raising hogs, 
cattle, sheep and horses. All in all, the 
raising of hogs was the most profitable, 
though during the war sheep paid well. 

On the organization of the township. 
Mr. Byers was elected trustee, which posi- 
tion he held for some years, and was then 
elected township treasurer, holding that 
office for twenty-one years. For some 
years he served as road commissioner and 
was elected and served several terms as 
justice of the peace. In 1S52, he was 
elected supervisor, and was then re-elected. 
.\fter a lapse of a few years, he was again 
elected and re-elected three times. During 
the last three years of his term of service, 
he was chairman of the board, a position 
he filled to the entire satisfaction of its mem- 
bers and the public generally. 

In 1876, Mr. Byers was elected to the 
legislature from De Kalb county, and 
was re-elected in 1878, serving two 
terms. While a member he was chairman 
of the committee on miscellaneous subjects, 
and was on the committee of education, 
highways and other important committees. 
He was an active member, and represented 
his constituents with signal ability. 

Mr. Byers was united in marriage at 
South Grove, January 10. 1833, to Miss 
Mary Ann Adee, daughter of Jonathan and 
Jane (Thompson) Adee. She was a native 
of Delaware county, New York, while her 
father was a native of New York state, and 
her mother of Ireland, By this union were 
two children, John T. and Augustus, the 



latter dying in infancy. John married 
Elizabeth Gibson, and the)' have six chil- 
dren, three boys and three girls, Arthur, 
Myrtie, Charles, Mabel, Margaret and James. 
They reside on the old home farm. Mrs. 
Mary A. Byers died November 12, 1856. For 
his second wife Mr. Byers married, Septem- 
ber I, 1859, Miss Jane Adee, a sister of his 
first wife. They have had three children — 
Delia, Anna and Jenny. The first named 
died in 1S87. xAnna married Gilbert H. 
Denton, a manufacturer of m.ining machin- 
ery and building material, and they now 
reside in Denver, Colorado. By profession 
he is a lawyer. The\- have two children, 
\\'illiam B. and Karen Irene. Jenny is 
li\'ing at home. 

In 1876, Mr. Byers mo\ed with his fam- 
ily to Sycamore, where he purchased an 
elegant home on Somonauk street, where he 
is now living somewhat retired from active 
life. Since coming to the city, and during 
Mayor EhvooJ's term of office, he was call- 
ed upon and served as alderman two terms. 
He is one of the substantial men of the 
county, his farms being among the finest 
and best, and no man in it is held in higher 
esteem. A strong Republican, his influence 
in the party has ever been great, and he 
has done much to promote its interest. 
Religiously, Mrs. Byers is a member of the 
Congregational church at Sycamore. For 
more than fifty years he has gone in and 
out among the people of De Kalb county, 
and it can be salely said that few men have 
done more to advance the material welfare 
of the countv. 



ORLANDO CARTER, deceased, was 
one of De Kalb county's worthy pio- 
neers. He was born 111 Chenango county. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



New "i'oik, January 2y, 1830, and was 
eleNen \ears of aL',e when his parents, Jared 
and Lydia (Aines) Carter, removed to Ohio, 
where lliev continued to reside two years, 
and at the end of that tiuie made another 
transfer to Iowa. In 1848 they came to 
IHinois and settled in De Kalb county, 
where the father becauie extensively engaf4ed 
in agricultural pursuits. He died in July, 
1S53, while his wife survived him a number 
of vears, dvin- in November, 1S7J. Their 
chil.lren were lAeiin,-, Orlando, Clark, 
David, l.y.lia, Jar,d and Joseph. 



his 



s (o De l^alb county, Illi- 
nois, he made it the field of active opera- 
ti(Uis up to the time of his death, which oc- 
curred in iSy,. He was twice married, 
his first wife being Miss Elizabeth Camii- 
bell, to whom he was wedded July 4, 1.S52. 
She was a native of New York, and the 
daughter of William and Sallie Campbell, 
who were formerly residents of Aftoii town- 
ship. De Kalb county, but who removed in 
1879 to Nebraska. The Campbells came 
to De Kalb county about the same time the 
Carters did. Mrs. Carter dietl .\pril o, i<S53, 
and Mr. Carter was again married in De 
Kalb, December 25, 1855, to Miss Huldah 
White, a nati\e of New York, born Febru- 
ary 3, 1836. Her parents removed from 
New York to Kaneville, Kane county, Illi- 
nois, about 1840. In 1854 they removed to 
De Kalb, Illinois, where her father died the 
following year of smallpox. His wife survived 
him many years, dying in i 892. Their family 
consisted of six children. Mrs. Carter being 
the only member of the family remaining 
in De Kalb county, the others residing in 
other parts. The children born to Orlando 
and Elizabeth Carter were William O., born 
October 14, 1856; Charles D., November 



19. 1858; Jesse M., July 5. 18O1: Ernest, 
September 24, 1S64; Eva, March 12, 1868; 
Mabel, October 23, 1871; and Cleo, July 
13, 1870. They are all living and residing 
in the cit)' of De Kalb, where they were 

Mr. Carter led a life of activity and fru- 
gality, and was resjiected and esteemed by 
all who knew him. He was one of the sul)- 
stanlial men of the township, owning a fine 
farm of three hundred and twenty acres, all 
under excellent improvement. Besides this 
heowiud valuable property in the city of 
De Kalf), where he resided for several years 
previous to his death. In j88i he pur- 
chased a livery stable, and successfully con- 
ducted the business up to the time of his 
sickness, which resulted in his death. Po- 
litically he cast his lot with the Demo- 
cratic party. Fraternall}- he was a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd P^ellows, 
being a charter member of the lodge in De 
Kalb. His remains were laid to rest in the 
beautiful cemetery of De K.alb. 



PELb;C, S. WTNSLO\\-, of Hinckley, 
Illinois, after a long and useful life, is 
now living retired. His residence in Illi- 
nois dates from 1842, when he located in 
Kane county. He is a native of Massachu- 
setts, born in the town of Chalmont, Frank- 
hn county, March 3, 1823, and is the son 
r)f Dr. George Winslow, who was born in 
\'ermont in 1783. The family are of En- 
glish descent, being descended from one of 
two brothers who came to America in the 
Mayflower and original!} settled in Massa- 
chusetts. 

Dr George Winslow grew to manhood 
in Vermont, there studied medicine, and 
later moved to Colerain, Massachusetts, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



117 



where he began to practice his profession. 
He was married three times, his last wife 
being the mother of our subject. Her name 
was Harriet Severance, and she \\'as a na- 
tive of Massachusetts. The Doctor prac- 
ticed in Massachusetts for some years and 
later came west, locating at Big Rock, Kane 
county, Illinois, where he resumed practice 
in which he continued some years, his pro- 
fessional services being required in both 
Kane and De Kalb counties. He died at 
Big Rock November 2, 1848, his wife sur- 
viving him for some years, dying in De Kalb 
county. 

Peelg S. Winslow spent his boyhood and 
youth in Massachusetts where he received 
a fair education in the common school and 
in Chalmont Seminar}-. From his boyhood 
he worked on a farm in summers, and at- 
tended school during the winter months. 
He remained at home until he attained his 
majority, when he came west to Kane coun- 
ty, Illinois, with Thomas Judd, who located 
there some years previous. On arriving in 
Kane county he went to work for Mr. Judd 
at Sugar Grove. On coming west, there 
being no railroad west of Ann Arbor, Mich- 
igan, he walked across that state to St. 
Joseph where he took a boat across the lake 
to Chicago, walking from there to Sugar 
Grove. After working for Mr. Judd during 
the summer of his arrival, in the fall of the 
same year, in partnership with his brother. 
Ebon Winslow, he purchased two hundred 
acres of raw land on credit, on the west line 
of Kane county. The followmg year he 
bioke and fenced forty acres, and in the 
second year put in a crop. After building 
a small shanty, twelve by fourteen feet, he 
moved in and there lived while further de- 
veloping the place. He later built a large, 
neat and substantial residence with good barn 



and other outbuildings, and there successful- 
ly engaged in farming until 1874, when he 
came to Hinckley, but continued to gi\-e 
personal attention to his farm for four 
years, after which he rented the place. He 
then built a business house in Hinckley and 
engaged in agricultural implement business 
for fourteen years, then sold out and has 
since lived retired. 

At Sugar Grove, Kane county, Illinois, 
May 6, 1847, Mr. Winslow was united in 
marriage with Miss Mary Alice Randall, a 
native of Connecticut, born in North Ston- 
ington, June 26, 182S, and a daughter of 
Jedediah Randall, who located in Sugar 
Grove township, Kane county, in 1842. 
Previous to this, however, he resided for a 
time in New York state, moving from there 
to Kane county, Illinois. By this union 
were three children, the first born dying 
when but five months old. Frank L., the 
second born, is well educated, a telegraph 
operator, who served also as agent of the 
Chicago & Iowa Railroad at Hinckley for 
twenty-two years. He then went to Men- 
dota, and for three years was in the freight 
department of the Chicago, Burlington & 
Quincy Railroad. He is now agent at Riv- 
erside, Illinois. He was married in Aurora 
to Ida E. Palmer, and they had one son, 
Ralph Palmer, who died when about seven- 
teen years of age. The third child of our 
subject is Belle, who remains at home and 
is housekeeper for her father. 

Mr. Winslow has been a Republican 
since the organization of the party, having 
voted for John C. Fremont in 1856, and 
for every presidential nominee of that party 
from that time to the present. He never 
desired nor would he accept office, save 
that of school director. His good wife died 
April 3, i8yi. I'or manv years blie was a 



lOCKAPHICAI. KKCORU. 



lueijibcr ui the Baptist church, and was a 
firm believer in the Christian religion, en 
deavoring to walk faithfully in the steps of 
her Master. Mr. Winslow is also a mem- 
ber of the Baptist church, and has for 
years taken a somewhat active part. For 
fifty-six years he has been a resident of Illi- 
nois, ai.d is therefore classed among the 
early settlers, one who has lived to see the 
nian\ wonderful changes that have so rap- 
iilly followed each other in the last half 
rentniy. His life has been an e.xemplary 
line, and all who know him have for him 
the utmost respect. 



HARNEY A. JONES has been one of the 
leading members of the I,)e Kalb coun- 
ty bar for o\era generation. He was born 
on the banks of the historical Burnett 
Creek, that winds its way through the old 
Tippecanoe battle ground, not many miles 
from Lafayette, Indiana, October 17, 1837. 
His paternal ancestors came from Cardigan- 
shire, South Wales, and settled on the 
Delaware \N'elsh tract, in 1710, where yet 
stands the old Welsh tract Baptist church, 
with British bullets imbedded in its walls, 
and where ti\e of Mr. Jones' ancestors 
preached the gi.ispel in the da_\s before the 
Kevolution. 

David Jones, the father of our subject, 
was born near Richmond, \'irginia, Febru- 
ary 18, 1798. and went with his parents to 
Monongahela county, N'irginia. now West 
Virginia, when he was three sears old. At 
the age of sixteen he was a pioneer of Clark 
county, Ohio, and in early manhood moved 
tu Indiana, where he died November 11, 
uS4y. He married Mary Owens, daughter 
of .\sa ami Deborah ;McMunn) Owens, 



Southern Ouakers, whose ancesiors were of 
Savannah, Georgia. Jonathan Owens, the 
father of Asa, had his right hand cut off b}' 
the British during the Resolution, because 
he would not fight, being a Quaker. 

Daniel Jones, the grandfather of our 
subject, was born near Wilmington, Dela- 
ware. .April 10. 1754. He died in Clark 
ccumty. Ohio, Ma^- 12, 1S32. He was a 
pioneer in ^^'est \'irginia, but lived three 
years in Greene count}', Pennsylvania, then 
settled in Clark county, Ohio. Rev. David 
Jones — chaplain of " Mad Anthony " Wayne 
and of General Gates' regiments — was a 
cousin of Daniel Jones. He was the grand- 
father of Horatio Gates Jones, the historian 
of Philadelphia. (See Appleton's Biograph- 
ical Dictionary. ) His father, the great- 
grandfather of our subject, was James Jones, 
a native of Wales, born in 1707, and who 
on coming to this country, located in New 
Castle county, Delaware, where his death 
occurred May 26, 17S6 He was a Baptist 
clergyman, and was a surgeon in the Ameri- 
can army, under General Gates He mar- 
ried Susanna Williams of the Welsh tract, 
New Castle county, Delaware. His father 
Re\'. David Jones, who was a great-great- 
grandfather of our subject, was born in 
Forrest ap Llanwenog. Cardiganshire, 
Wales, in 1668, and came to America in 
1710, settling in New Castle county, Dela- 
ware, where he died August 20, 174H. He 
was a Calvinist Methodist clergyman, and 
married Esther Morgan, daughter of Morgan 
ap I\h3'drith, a chieftain in Cardiganshire, 
under Cromwell. Asa Owen's people were 
from Wales, and as already stated were 
Quakers in religious belief. The ancestors 
of Deborah McMunn were also Quakers, and 
came from the north of Ireland. They 
came to the United States and located in 




HARVEY A. JONES. 



THE BIOCxRAPHICAL RECCRL^ 



Georgia, with the Oglethorpe settlers. Both 
families were early settlers in Clark county, 
Ohio, locating near Dayton, in 1812, where 
the parents of our subject were married. 
During their early married life, the}- emi- 
grated to Tippecanoe county, Indiana. Of 
their children, Amanda married Benjamin 
Morehouse, and is now deceased. John M. 
C. was among the early seekers for gold in 
California, where he settled and later be- 
came sheriff of Siskiyou county. He died 
in 18S2. .Abel went to Oregon. James O. 
was graduated at the la\\- department of the 
University of Michigan, but later became a 
farmer in Indiana. Deborah, who married 
Owen Hill, is deceased. Lewis is a farmer 
in Missouri. Levi M. was a real estate 
agent at Fort Wayne, Indiana. He is now- 
deceased. Harve\' A., our subject, was 
ne.xt in order of birth. David C. w-as a 
graduate of the law department of the Uni- 
\-ersity of Michigan, figured quite promi- 
nently in politics in Tippecanoe, but is now 
deceased. .Asa F., was a physician and re- 
sided on the old homestead at Cirand 
Prairie, Indiana, until his death. 

The early years of Harvey A. Jones were 
spent at home, like most farmer boys. Until 
the age of seventeen he attended the com- 
mon schools of his neighborhood, and then 
became a student in the Wabash Indiana 
College, of Crawfordsville, Indiana, finish- 
ing his literary course, howexer, at Lom- 
bard University, Calesburg. After leaving 
college in 1861, he went to Missouri, where 
he engaged in teaching. After a few months 
spent in that profession, on account of the 
Civil war, he was compelled to change his 
plans. Returning to Illinois, he became a 
student in the law office of Hon. A. M. Har- 
rington, of Geneva, Kane county. He read 
law there until 1863, when he entered the 



University of Michigan, and was graduated 
from the law department in 1863. 

.\fter lea\-ing the uni\-ersit)-, .\lr. |oiies 
Settled in Sycamore, Illinois, to commence 
the practice of his profession. He formed 
a partnership with Daniel B. James, later 
county judge, which partnership terminated 
in 1869. His next law partner was Charles 
A. Bishop, now judge of the sixteenth judi- 
cial circuit, who became associated with 
him in 1880, and who had been a student 
in his office. This partnership continued 
until 1887, \\-hen it \\-as dissolved. They 
made a strong law firm, and there were few 
cases of importance in De Kalb county in 
which the_\- w-ere not on one side or the 
other. Later he formed a partnership with 
C. D. Rogers, which still continues. 

Mr. Jones practices in both state and 
federal courts, and during his long legal 
career has been associated with some of the 
most important litigations before the courts 
of this circuit. .\mong the noted cases in 
which he has been associated as counsel are 
Priichard vs. Walker, in which he was 
counsel for the plaintiff; Walker vs. Pritch- 
ard, when he was counsel for the defendant ; 
Jonci vs. Lloyd, when he was counsel for 
plaintiff; Pooler vs. Christnian, when he 
was counsel for the plaintiff; Barron's vs. 
Cltv of Sycaiiiorf. This last was a damage 
suit brought by the plaintiff against the city 
for the erection of a standpipe. This case 
was prosecuted by Mr, Jones, assisted by 
his partner. All of these cases mentioned 
were noted ones, and attracted wide atten- 
tion by their importance, and the lei;al 
ability with which they were conducted on 
both sides, and on account of the nice legal 
points involved. In the case of Halle vs. 
Ball — in which Mr. Jones took the position 
that a married w^on-ian had the right to sue 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



in hei" own name. This was the first case 
of the kind to be brought in Illinois, the 
le,£,'al ruling having heretofore been con- 
trary to his position. There has since been 
a law placed on the statute books permit- 
tiuf; a woman to bring action in her own 
name. 

Mr. |ones is careful and methodical in 
the preparation of causes, and when he 
goes to trial either as a prosecutor or a de- 
fender, the client will not suffer the want 
for a vigorous, able and skillful handling of 
his cauje. Before a jury he is strong and 
convincing, always presenting the points in 
his case in a clear, logical and convincing 
manner. He is a good advocate and good 
pleader, strong in his own case, and a for- 
midable opponent. 

Mr. Jones is a member of the Masonic 
()rder, and lias attained the l-inight Tem- 
plar degree. He is also a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Knights of the Clobe. Politically he has 
been a consistent Republican, and has given 
as much time to the advocacy of its prin- 
ciples as his arduous professional duties 
would allow. In 1888, he was presidential 
elector for the fifth Illinois district. He 
has alwa\'s been an ardent temperance man, 
and with \(jice and pen has labored for the 
cause, believing however that its interests 
could the better be served through the Re- 
publican party. 

Neither in his reading or his studies has 
Mr. Jones confined himself to the law. His 
mind has taken a wide range in other fields 
of thought and literature, keeping himself 
well posted in the topics that interest the 
people in the closing days of the nineteenth 
century. He did not leave off study when 
he left the college hall, but his books have 
still been his companions, often to shake 



off the dust of courts and law books, to re- 
fresh and soothe the spirit for a night's re- 
pose. 

During his long residence in Sycamore, 
his life both private and public has been 
such as to win the confidence and esteem of 
all. In seeking recreation and relief from 
professional labors, he has been greatly 
blessed in the companionship of an edu- 
cated and intellectual wife, who can find 
time from domestic duties to keep up her 
literary studies and reading. 

Mrs. Jones, ncc Sarah Dudley Perkins, 
has seven printed genealogies of Puritan 
families, five of them historical, who num- 
ber her among their descendants. She is 
in the eighth generation in direct descent 
from Governor Thomas Dudley, the second 
colonial governor, through the Rev. Samuel 
Dudley, of the first settlement of Exeter, 
New Hampshire, whose first wife was a 
daughter of Governor Winthrop. Thomas 
Dudley was the governor whose signature 
is affixed to the charter of Harvard College, 
and for whom the office of major-general 
was created, he being the first to ever bear 
the title. Her paternal ancestor, Quarter- 
master John Perkins, so called because he 
was sent across the ocean for supplies for 
the Puritans, was one of three brothers 
who came in the ship Lyon, 1628, with 
Roger Williams and the ancestor of Ralph 
Waldo Emerson for passengers. She is 
collaterally related (descended from the 
same Puritan ancestor) to Major-General 
Artemus Ward (who was the temporary 
commander-in-chief before Washington) and 
with Major-General Dearborn and Lorenzo 
Dow, the eccentric preacher. None of 
Mrs. Jones' ancestors came later than 1680, 
with the exception of Darby Kelley, who 
came o\er in 1710. The late General 15, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



[23 



F. Kelley, of West Virginia, who raised the 
first negro regiment south of Mason and 
Dixon's hne, was also a descendant of 
Darby Kelley. 

Sarah Dudlex' Perkins was born October 
14, 1838, at St. Charles, then known as 
Charleston. Kane county, Illinois. Her 
father, Otho Williams Perkins, came from 
Boston, Massachusetts, to Kane county, in 
June, 1834, where his only brother, Eph- 
riam, had already settled. They were burn 
in Hebron, Grafton county. New Hamp- 
shire. Otho was two years the elder and 
was born June 16, 1806. Mrs. Jones was 
the eldest of three children, her two broth- 
ers dying before she was eighteen. The 
youngest, Otho \\'., Jr., died April 15, 1855, 
at the age of fourteen, and Jonathan Dud- 
ley, the other brother, July 8, 1856, at the 
age of si.xteen years. 

Otho W. Perkins was married to Nancy 
Kelley at St. Charles, Illinois, January 6, 
1838, at the home of his cousin and Miss 
Keiley's brother-in-law, the husband of her 
youngest sister, Sarah Dudley Kelly. Mr. 
N. H. Dearborn was the pioneer justice of 
the peace in St. Charles. Sarah Dudley 
(Kelley) Dearborn was born at New Hamp- 
ton, New Hampshire, and died at St. 
Charles, Illinois. October !2, 1838. The 
following poem written by Mrs. Jones, in 
October, 1886, was dedicated to her mem- 
ory: 



Oh I sky and meadow, wood and glen, 

Oh! murmuring river, fair as when 

I saw thee first in childhood's years, 

To-day, the pictured scene appears. 

Tranced by its glow, I watch the sky, 

(As on the hillside turf I lie,) 

And question what beyond— if true 

That thou sweet Aunt, thy namesake knev 

While thy green grave, beside me spread. 

Was mv earliest les=on of the dead. 



.And one and fifty years have sped 

Since thou wert numbered with the dead; 

But two bleak days shadowed thy tomb, 

Ere ope'd my eyes on a world of gloom; 

Sad tears of vain regret must fall 

Upon my cradle, as a pall. 

For wintry blast's untimely >ua\ . 

(Jctober's glory swept away; 

.Mocking the promise the laud had held. 

Of fruitage fair, and garnered field. 

.\nd scarce ten years have passed away, 

Since I wandered where thy girlhood lay; 

Where stern New England's hills arise. 

Whose white peaks pierce New Hampshire skies; 

.And there I found thy memory green. 

Kept two score years, what thou hadst been. 

.And gray haired men, they spoke of thee, 

.As the fairest flower of their memory. 

Transplanted to the western wild. 

By untimely frosts and death despoiled. 

Otho W. Perkins was one of the pioneer 
Universalists of the west, and one of the 
thirteen who founded and built the first 
Universalist church west of the Great Lakes, 
at St. Charles, three years before even a 
Universalist society had been organized in 
Chicago. He also contributed liberally 
toward purchasing the printing press and 
establishing the first Universalist denomi- 
national paper in Chicago, "The Better 
Covenant", the predecessor of the present 
"Universalist", the Rev. William Rounse- 
ville, pastor from St. Charles, going to 
Chicago to be editor of the paper. 

The father of Otho W. Perkins, born in 
Ipswich, Mass., was a descendant of "Quar- 
termaster" John Perkins, who came from 
Gloucestershire, England, with his father's 
family, to Salem, thence to Ipswich, in the 
ship Lyon, in 1628. The wife of Jacob 
Perkins, the maternal grandmother of O. 
W. Perkins, was Hannah Andrews, a 
descendant of Captain John Andrews (some- 
times spelled Andrus), who came to Ipswich 
in 1630. Captain John Andrews was also 



THIC HIOCIRAFHICAL RECORD. 



the ancestor of julin A. Aiidievvs. the war 
^oveninr ><! Massachusetts diirin>^ the Civil 

The mother of Utho W , Perkins was 
Thiiza Dearborn, who died when her son 
was but five years old. Site was a descend- 
ant of Godfrey Dearborn of the first settle- 
ment of E.xeter, New Hampshire, then part 
of the Massachusetts Colony, who came 
from Devonshire, England, in KJjS. He 
was also the American ancestor of Major- 
General Henry Dearborn, the commander- 
in-chief in the war of I 812. and the one for 
whom Fort Dearborn was named. The 
mother of Thirxa Dearborn, the maternal 
grandmother of Otho W. Perkins, was Abi- 
gail Ward, the daughter of the Rev. Nathan 
Ward, whu was the first Congregational 
rlerg_\niaii m Pl\niouth, New Hampshire. 
The youngest sister of Thirza Dearborn, 
Eliza I Dearborn! Scott, is yet living in 
Exeter, New Hampshire, and on her eighty- 
sixth biithda}- the Boston newspapers 
chronicled the fact that she was the oldest 
living widow of a Methodist clergyman in 
New England. .She is a widow and was the 
second wde of the Rev. Orange Scott, who 
separated from the Methodist Episcopal 
cliurch on the slavery question, and founded 
the \Vesleyan organizatioh. 1 See Apple- 
ton's IJiogiaphical Dictionary, for Orange 
Scott. I Abigail Ward was a descendant of 
William Ward, of Sudbury, who was also 
the ancestor of Artemus Ward, who was the 
provisional Major-General in the Revolu- 
tion, before \\'ashington. 

The mother of Mrs. Jones, Nancy Kelly, 
was born in New Hampton, Belknap (then 
Stafford) county, New Hampshire, July 30, 
1807. She was the daughter of Dudley and 
Ruth ,Dow) Kelly. Her education was 
obtained m the New Hampton Female Sem- 



inar}', once the leading preparatory for col- 
lege in New England. Her father, who 
was one of the trustees of the school for 
many vears, was a finished scholar and for 
many years was a teacher. He was born in 
Exeter, the suburb of Brentwood, in 1761. 
He enlisted at the age of sixteen in the Rev- 
olutionary army. His father was Darby 
Kelly, son of Daniel, who was born in 
Waterford, Ireland, in 1700, and who at 
the age of ten years ran away to sea as a 
cabin boy, on a ship of which his cousin 
was captain, coming to Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire. When he refused to recross 
the ocean, he was left by his kinsman, and 
never saw or heard of any of his people 
afterward. He was adopted into the family 
of Phillip Huntoon, of Exeter, whose 
daughter Sarah he married, at the age of 
twenty-eight. (See Huntoon Genealogy.) 
His second wife was Sarah Dudley ( 1 760), 
who was a granddaughter of the Rev. Sam- 
uel Dudley, of the f:rst Exeter settlement. 
He was the eldest son of Governor Thomas 
Dudley, the second colonial governor. 
Rev. Samuel Dudley's first wife, was a 
daughter of Go /ernor Winthrop. (See 
Dudley Genealogy.) 

The ancestor of Governor Thomas Dud- 
ley was Edmund de Sutton, who was one of 
the knights who came over with William 
the Norman. Edmund de Sutton was the 
first baron of Dudley. He married the Sax- 
on heiress of Dudley castle, which was 
then five hundred years old. The numer- 
ous descendants of Governor Thomas Dud- 
ley include some of the most illustrious 
names in our country, among them the 
Channings, the Danas, the famous Field 
family, of whom Cyrus W. , David Dudley 
and Chief Justice Field are members, Wen- 
dall Phillips, Oliver Wendall Holmes, and 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



a score of others almost as well known to 
fame. Thomas Dudley was the governor 
who signed the charter of Harvard College, 
and almost ahva^'S since some descendant 
has been a member of the faculty. Charles 
Eliot Norton, at the present time, is one of 
Governor Dudley's descendants. Both of 
the wives (cousins Dana and Channing) of 
Washington Alston, the painter, also the 
second wife of Sir Ed vin Arnold, an Ameri- 
can lady who was a Channing, and the wife 
of Edward Everett Hale who is a grand- 
daughter of Rew Lyman Beechen, is a 
descendant both of Goxernor Dudley and 
John Perkins. (See Dudley Genealogy, i 
Ann Dudley Bradstreet was a daughter of 
Governor Thomas Dudley and the sister of 
Rev. Samuel Dudley and Governor Joseph 
Dudley. She married Simon Bradstreet 
and published the first book of poems in 
America. The following sonnet acrosticx 
on the three Dudleys was written by Mrs. 
Jones in 1S84 and published in the Inter- 
Ocean: 

i.Vnn Duclley lirad.strr.n.i 
.\tlo\vii two centuries and a half thy fame 
\(>w wakes faint echo as we speak thy name. 
Nor holds on modern thought but feeble claim. 
But thou, the first verse-writer of our land, 
Reign'st as the first and hold'st that place thi- saim- 
As thou wert laureate of that Pilgrim band, 
Down to our time thy chait of rank will .•stand. 
Sober and serious, earnest — never vain- 
The Puritans held their life and speech and deed, 
Robbed of all flowers, they sought but ripened seed. 
Earth-life they shaped to fit their somber creed; 
Each act in view of their immortal gain, 
Thou only sang'st with repressed and formal slr.iin. 
II. 
iSir Philip Sidney.) 
The brightest star that, undimmed by mist or clciud, 
Out of the darkness shines of that dark age. 
Pouring a luster o'er the tarnished page — 
History unrolls of the cruel base and proud 
In every grace of manly chivalry, 
Living the truest, highest, noble.st, be.st; 



In courage, art, thy life pales all the rest. 
Pales as the rushlight in the light of day, 
So to the end, on Zutphen's field of blood. 
In glory's panoply thy life went down; 
Death found thee but to give a shining crown 
N'ever to fade, her model of every good 
England still holds thee, still thy fame has stood 
Vet deemed her flower of chivalry and manhood. 
111. 
(.Sir Robert Dudley. I 
.So c\ er, if above llie rabble raised. 
In fortune's favor or a prince's smile. 
Roused in all hatred, malice, envy's guile, 
Revenge with it's sharp spite their names assail. 
On you it fell not, Leice.ster, the while - 
Beyond their feeble shafts, while they dispraised. 
Even though ambition, the evil of thy dav, 
Ruled in thy heart and life, still were you strong 
To hew thy path regardless of the throng. 
Darker the fate that swept thy sire away; 
I nder its ban his sire, too, met his fate — 
Doomed by that innate [>nwei- that marked them 

great- 
Lies, slanders, vile surmise, of all the prey 
Envy, that could not reach their high estate, 
^'elped at their heels to their last fated day. 

The mother of Nancy Kelly Perkins (Mrs. 
Jones' maternal grandmother^ was Ruth 
Dow, born in Old Hampton, New Hamp- 
shire. Her father, Jonathan Dow, was the 
first cousin uf Lorenzn Dow, the eccentric 
preacher, who \isited at the- hnnif of Dud- 
ley Kelly in iSio, when Nancy Kell\- was 
three years old. This was during Lorenzo 
Dow's last tour through the New England 
stales. Their American Dow ancestor was 
also the ancestor of General Neal Dow, the 
famous Maine Law champion. 

Mrs. Jones was educated in a select 
school at St. Charles, with one _\ear at St. 
Agatha's Academy, Sisters of Mercy, Chi- 
cago, where she was awarded the gold medal 
lor composition in 1855. The old academy 
building before the Chicago fire was where 
Mercy Hospital now stands. In August, 
1857, she entered Lombard University, 
Galesburg, Illinois, for the four years clas- 



126 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



sical course. She was a fellow student for 
the four years with Harve3' A. Jones. The\- 
were married at Galesburg. at the home o{ 
Rev. j. P. Fuller, February 22, 1861. Rrv. 
Fuller was the first Universalist preacher in 
the state of Missouri, and the second in Illi- 
nois. For one year succeeding their mar- 
riage i\fr. |ones taught school in Callaway 
count)', Missouri, and studied law at the 
same time. On account of the increasing 
danger to Northern residents, they left the 
state the second year of the war, and on ac- 
count (if the serious illness of Mrs. Jones' 
ini^ther, they went to St. Charles, Illinois, 
where after a lingering illness the mother 
died June 28, 1863. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jones are the parents of 
se\'en children as follows: (1 ; Dudley Rell)', 
born and died May 5, 1862, at St. Charles, 
Illinois. (2; Mary Fuller, born at St. Charles, 
May 10, 186.V She was married at Syca- 
more, Illinois, No\ember 27, 1884, to Elmer 
Jerome Baker, the publisher and one of the 
proprietors of the Chicago Farm Implement 
News. rhey were married by the Rew D. 
P. P>aker, the father of the groom. Mr. 
Baker wa"; educated at the Hit;h School in 
Sycamore, supplemented by an attendance 
of one 3ear at Wheatun College, and at the 
State University, Champaign, Illinois. Mr. 
and Mrs. Baker have two children, Ruth 
Mary, born September 29, 1885, and Elmer 
Jerome, Jr., born in Chicago, January 3, 
i88q. At the present time, Miss Ruth Mary, 
accompanied b\- her mother, who is super- 
intending her studies, is now traveling and 
attending school abroad. During the fall 
and winter of 1897 she was at school at 
Nice, Ital\', and at present is in Rome, Italy. 
Mrs. Baker was educated at the Sycamore 
High School, from which she graduated. 
She attended the Musical Conservatorv at 



Fort Wayne, Indiana, and at Vassar, Pough- 
keepsie, New York. (3) Owen Dudley was 
born at Sycamore, November 21, 1865. ^"d 
died January 21, 1867. (4) .\nna Kelly, 
born at Sycamore, February 10, 1869, was 
married July 10, 1889, at Sycamore, to 
deorge .Manford Clayberg, principal of the 
C hicago West Division High School. They 
were married by the Rev. J. E. June, pas- 
tor of the UniversaHst church at Sycamore. 
Mr. Clayberg was educated at Michigan 
Cniversit}', where he took the mathematical 
prize and won the Houghton Scholarship 
in 1805. He also attended a course of lect- 
ures at the Cierman universities. Mrs. 
Claylterg recei\-ed her primary education in 
the Sycamore schools, and took the four- 
v'ears course and graduated from the Chi- 
cago West Division High School in the class 
of 1889. Mr. and Mrs. Clayberg have had 
three children — Harold Dudley and Harvey 
Alston (twins), born January 24, 1892, in 
Chicago, and Dorothea Marion, born at Oak 
Park, July 27, 1893. Harvey Alston died at 
Oak Park, July 3, 1892.(5) Harvey Alston, 
}r. , was born at Sycamore, October 28, 
1 87 1, and died April 12, 1880. (6) Sarah 
Dudley, born at Sycamore, June 24, 1873, 
died July 15, 1873. ij) David Ducley, born 
July 21, 1874, at S\camore, died April 5, 
1880. 

On the Hrst birthdav of her second child. 
Mar)- Fuller, Mrs. Jones penned the follow- 
ing poem, which was printed in the Chicago 



One ytrnr uld to-day'. 

Our little baby girl. 
The cloud-flecked skies, with clearest ray 

Blend azure tint with pearl. 
And all around the glorious May 

Its banners gay unfurl — 
Just as it welcomed you, our jiet — 
'To life and love that ijuards you yd. 



THE BIOGRAPKICAL 



Vour footsteps falter now 

Upon a threshold new, 
While on your pure young baby-brn« 

Missteps have left no rue; 
Thus may your future footsteps go 

In pathways straight and true; 
No bitterness of sin and tears 
To bhght the joy of coming years. 

Within your eyes I look, 
Sweet babe, so dark and deep. 

And your broad, fair brow is a sealed bonk 
Of latent powers that sleep; 

Lithe, restless limbs that will not brnok 
A long restraint to keep. 

While in your pouting lips we kn(.)\\, 

Are affection's power and fervent glow. 

Within your tiny veins 

The life-blood mingling tfows, 
From Georgia's bright Savannah plains. 

And bleak New England's snows; 
If beauty's spell around thee reigns, 

May life high aims disclose, 
And the wild South-fire, may its glow 
Be pure and clear as New England's snnw. 

Sweet birdhng of the May, 

That fills our own home-nest 
With music, gladsome as the lay 

That thrills the wood-bird's breast, 
May ever flowers spring round thy way. 

No thorns bring thee unrest. 
Till the flowers immortal bloom for thee. 
Still farther on o'er death's dark sea. 



THEODORE O. BERG resides on sec- 
tion 19, Milan township, where he owns 
a farm of three hundred and twenty acres, 
which he keeps under the highest state of 
cultivation. He is a native of Norway, 
born near Christina, November 23, 1833, 
and in his native country grew to manhood 
and received a limited education. In 1S33, 
he came to the United States, taking ship 
at Christina, for Quebec, from which place 
he came directly west to Chicago, arriving 
in that city. He made the trip with his 
brother Ole Berg, and they went direct to 
La Salle coimty, where our" subject com- 



menced work on a farm by the month, and 
continued to be thus employed foroneyear, 
when he was taken sirk, ancf reinained in ill 
health for two years. He then resumed 
work on a farm, and later ptirchased a 
threshing machine and engaged in threshing 
and also in teaming. 

Mr.Berg was •iiarried in Henderson coun- 
ty, Illinois, in 1S5S, to Maria Donaldson, a 
nati\e of Norway, who came to the United 
States in the spring of 1853, and located 
first in Chicago, after whicli she went to 
Henderson countw .\fter marriage, Mr. 
Berg rented a farm for three years in Hen- 
derson county, which he operated, and in 
1864 moved to De Kalb count}' and pur- 
chased eighty acres of unimproved land in 
Milan township, on which he located, and 
as time passed, made other purchases of 
laml until he was the owner of six hundred 
acres, all of which was well improved. His 
home place may be considered a inodel farm, 
having all the improvements used on a farm at 
the presenttime, including a gasoline engine 
for pumping water for stock and grinding 
feed for the same. Coming to this country 
without a dollar, his success in life has been 
remarkable, and all has been acquired by 
his own labor, assisted by his good wife. 
They are the parents of two children, Oscar 
T. , who is married and residing on the old 
farm, and Amelia, wife of A. Sanderson, a 
farmer of Milan township. They have lost 
three children. Caroline grew to woman- 
hood, married Charles Sanderson, and died 
leaving six children. Oscar died at the age 
of four \'ears, and Caroline died in infancy. 
To each of his children he has given good 
farms, while yet retaining the home farm of 
three hundred and twenty acres. 

In addition to his general farming, Mr. 
ISerg has for years owned and operated a 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



steam thresher, and has now one of the 
most complete threshing machines manu- 
factured. He began the business before 
coming to Ue Kalb county, and has con- 
tinued in the same to the present time, 
making U a source of some revenue. He 
has always been in favor of good roads, and 
for si.'s years ser\'ed as connnissioner of higli- 
ways, giving much of his time to the im- 
provement of tlie roads. Politically he is a 
Republican, luit is not what is now termed 
a politician. He believes \n the prmciples 
of the parly and .umually votes his party 
ticket. He and his wife have been lifelong 
members of the Lutheran church. They 
are good people and are held in the highest 
esteem wdierever known. 



MORRIS WILLLY is one of the lead- 
ing farmers of DcKalb township. His 
beautiful and productive farm is situated on 
sections 28, 21 and 3:;, and consists of 
three hundred and thirt}- acres. This farm 
he did not inherit, but it is the result of in- 
cessant toil, rigid economy and practical 
honesty. H- is in every sense of the word 
a self-made man. Everything about his 
farm has the appearance of thrift, his build- 
ings being models of neatness, while his 
stock shows excellent care. 

Mr. Willej- was born in Jefferson coun- 
t\-. New York, July 5, 1S27, and is the son 
of l-:ieazer and Wealthy 'Marsh) Willey, 
both of whom were nati\-es of the same 
state. Eleazer Willey was a man of integ- 
rity and influence in his native town. He 
was a strict member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, and for years held the posi- 
tion of class leader in the same. His death 
occurred in 1832, his wife surxiving him a 
few years, dying in 1S3.S. There were sc\ en 



children born to them, our subject being 
sixth in order of birth. He was reared and 
educated in his native town, where he re- 
mained until he was sixteen years of age, 
when he came to Illinois in company with 
h. Richardson, with whom he had lived 
after the death of his parents. They lo- 
cated at Aurora, Illinois, where our subject 
remained until after he reached his major- 
ity, when he left his foster father and worked 
out by the month. 

In 1850. in cumpaii}- with others, Mr. 
Willey took the overland route for Cali- 
fornia, where he arri\ed after a ver}' tedious 
journev of some UKiiiths. While in that 
new Eldorado, he worked in the mines, and 
in tlie course of two years accumulated 
about fifteen hundred dollars. Satisfied 
with his experience in California, he re- 
turned to Illinois, and in DeKalb county 
rented land for a short time, and became 
quite a successful farmer, so much so that in 
1855, he purchased one hundred and sixty 
acres, a portion of his present farm, to 
which he added from time to time, until it 
has reached three hundred and thirty acres. 

On the 14th of July, 1S55, Mr. ^^'illey 
married Miss Mar\- Bo\ee, a native of Boone 
county, Indiana, born October 9, 1838, and 
a daughter of Richard and Orpha Z. Bovee. 
The latter was born in iSii, and three of 
her uncles were soldiers in the Revolutionary 
war, and witnessed the hanging of Major 
Andre, of the British army. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Willey nine children have been born: 
Warren B., born March 14, 1857; Harry, 
January 17, 1859, and who died March 20, 
1884; Sarah I., .\pril 4, i 861, and who died 
September 29, 1867; Caroline, .\ugust 
15, 1863, and who died February 11, 1894; 
Eliza C, October 30, 1865: Emily, Septem- 
ber 21, 1869; Wealthy .M., April 3, 1872; 




MORRIS WILLEY. 




MRS. MORRIS WILLEY. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECOKU. 



Richard M., February 13, iSj^iand Lelah 
L.. July 6, 187S. 

Mr. Willey and his family are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, a 
church with which he has been connected 
since January, 1858, and of which he has 
been a faithful member, many times holding 
responsible offices in it, and now sersing as 
trustee. As a citi;i;en he is progressive and 
enterprising, being at all tinjes willing to do 
his full share in the upbuilding of hisadopted 
county, which has now been his honu- for 
nearl\" half a centurv. Then' home is t)ne 
of hospitality, and their friends are many. 



JB. AURNER is a retired farmer resid- 
ing in De Kalb, Illinois, anrl is a pioneer 
of 1834. He was born jamiry fi, iSiS, 
near Berwick, and is the son of Henry and 
Betsy (Belick) Aiirner. P>y orcnpation 
Henry Anrner was a wea\-pr. and remo\-ed 
from Berwick in the spring of 1S20. to 
Cieneseo, New 'S'ork. to better his financial 
condition. He remnined in Genpspo for a 
number of years, but finall\' reiiio\pd to 
Western Illinois, and e\"entnallv found his 
way to De Kalb county, in i!^46, twelve 
years after his son, J. B., had made it his 
home He died in 1852, at the age of ninety 
years, while his wife survived him, dying in 
1858, at the age of eighty-eight years. 
Their lives were long, eventful and useful. 
Tradition tells ns that the grandfather of 
Henry Aiirner was secretary to William 
Penn. His fainih' consisted of eight chil- 
dren, two of whom are yet living. Henry 
F. and J. B. 

The subject of this sketch spent his boy- 
hood in Pennsylvania, and in New York, 
where he remained until his fourteenth 



year. In 1832, he went to Michigan and 
there spent one year. This, as well as sub- 
sequent years, was one ot varied e.xper- 
iences He was now beginning to hew out 
his own destiny in a new country, with few 
advantages and little if any encouragement. 
In iS33,he traveled through Illinois, but did 
not locate. He v.'as then in company with, 
and in the employ of an Indian trader, 
\vhose custom was to spend the milder part 
of the year in traveling through Illinois, but 
wintering in Michigan, where facilities for 
comfort were greater. Mr. .Anrner was in 
this count}' when the first election was 
held, previous to its becoming Kane comit\', 
but did not then make it his . permanent 
home. He saw it pass from La Salle to 
Kane, and from Kane to Do Kalb coiintv, 
during his parK' years. It was not, hnwe\er, 
until 1847 that he came to stay perma- 
nenth' and winter in the counts'. 

From 1837 tn 1848 he made his home 
with Wilham A. Milh-r, for wh. nil he worked 
and frr.m whom he learned the carpenter's 
trade. Three of these eleven years were 
spent on the upper Mississippi, carrying the 
mnil for Mr. Miller, who had the contract from 
Fort Crawford to Fort Snelling. He subse- 
quently worked on the lower Mississippi one 
and a half years as a boathand, but sickness 
caused him to abandon this vocation. All 
this time he was looking after and improv- 
ing his land in De Kalb count}-. 

On the 1st ot Februar}', 1849, Mr. 
.Aurner married Miss Adelaine Jarrod, a 
native of Tioga county. New York, March 
17, 1828, and the daughter of Jeremiah and 
Orpha Jarrod, who remo\'ed from New 
York to Ohio, in 1830, thence to Illinois, 
in 1837, and to Wisconsin, in 1840. where 
they remained some years, but finally re- 
moved to Blackhawk coiintv, Iowa, where 



34 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Mrs. Jarrod died May 15, 1873, at the age 
of seventy- one years. She was born in 
Watertown, New York, in 1S02. Mr. Jar- 
rod was born in Long Island, in 1798, and 
died ni March. 1885, at the age of eighty- 
se\en >ears. 

To J. B. and Adelaine Aurner two chil- 
dren were born, George H., January 3, 
1850, and .\nnette A., May 31, 1852. 
George H. Aurner became a phj-sician of 
wide reputation and practice. He recei\'ed 
his primary education in De Kalb, and first 
began reading medicine under Dr. Hopkins, 
a well-known physician of De Kalb, and 
completed his course at Rush Medical Col- 
lege, Chicago, from which he graduated in 
1 87 I, at the age of twenty-one years. He 
began his practice in Ogle county, where he 
met with good success, and where he re- 
mained eight years. He then remoxed to 
Hanover, Kansas, where he met with the 
same success, and where in addition to his 
practice, he engaged in the drug trade. No 
man was more beloved, none could be more 
successful. His carefulness of patients and 
strict personal attention to every detail, cost 
him his life. He contracted the disease and 
also bloodpoisoning, while attending a pa- 
tient suffering from diphtheria. He departed 
this life April 11, i8gi. He married Miss 
Hattie Smith, January i, 1871, and who 
died April 6, 1888, leaving four children: 
George A., born June 15, 1872; Grace H., 
January 7, 1874; Myrtle B., August 26, 
1876; and Edna May, Deceinber 9, 1878. 
Tlie Doctor subsequently married and by 
the Second marriage had one child, Ida A., 
born January 16, iSgr. Annette Aurner 
married Noyes Belknap, Novembers, 187Q, 
and for a second husband she married \V. 
C. Keeler, yardmaster of the Chicago & 
Northwestern Railway, at De Kalb, Illinois. 



This latter marriage was solemnized Octo- 
ber I 5, '1890. 

The first purchase of land made by our 
subject consisted of two hundred and eighty 
acres, which cost him one dollar and twen- 
ty- fi\-e cents per acre. To this he added 
two hundred and eighty acres more, these 
purchases being made under the administra- 
tions of Presidents Van Buren and Polk, 
whose names are attached to his deeds. 
Half of this land he disposed of, and np\\' 
owns two hundred and thirty acres of highly 
improved land. Mr. .\urner is much re- 
spected b)- his fellow citi/ens for his sterling 
worth. 



WILLIAM M, ATHERTON is a vet- 
eran of the war for the I'nion, and 
an enterprising farmer residing on section 
19, Paw Paw township. He was born in 
Luzerne count}-, Pennsylvania, March 21, 
(84[, and is the son of Ralph .\therton, a 
native of Massachusetts, born April 1, 1804. 
The ])aternal grandfather, Jonathan Ather- 
ton, was also a native of Massachusetts, 
and there spent his entire life, his old home- 
stead being still owned and occupied b\- one 
of his sons, Zora Atherton. In his native 
state Ralph Atherton grew to maidiood, 
being one of four sons, all of whom are over 
si.x feet in height. He went to Pennsyl- 
vaniaa young man in 1828, locating in Lu- 
zerne county, where he married Maria Sine, 
a native of New Jersey, who went to Lu- 
zerne cmmty a miss of twehe jears, with 
her father, Phillip Sine, who was a miller 
by occupation, and there engaged in the 
milling business. Ralph Atherton was a 
shoemaker by trade, and served an appren- 
ticeship of seven years. He opened up a 
store and engaged in the boot and shoe 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECOK 



business for several years in Scranton, 
Penns_vlvania. In 1S43 he came to DeKall") 
county, Illinois, and entered a tract of two 
hundred acres, a portion of which now com- 
prises the farm of our subject. Locating on 
his claim he built a log house, in which he 
lived for eight years, while improving the 
farm. During the winter he worked at his 
trade, and carried on quite an extensi\'e 
business, making boots and shoes for the 
people in the surrounding country. The old 
log house gave place to a more modern 
frame building after eight years, and he 
there reared his family. .\fter the death of 
his wife, he went to Kansas and resided 
with a son two or three years, then returned 
to Illinoisand spent his last years, dying at 
the residence of a daughter in Lee county, 
September 6, 1890, at the age of eighty-si.\ 
years. In his family were seven sons and 
four daughters, of whom four sons and three 
daughters yet survive. 

William M. Atherton came to DeKalb 
county, when a child, and grew to manhood 
on the farm where he now resides. After 
attending the common schools, he spent 
several terms in Union Academy, at Paw 
Paw. He was married in Sycamore. Feb- 
ruary 2, 1861, to Miss Ellen Burch, a native 
of Ohio, but who was reared in DeKalb 
county. In the spring of 1862, he engaged 
in farming, but his services were in demand 
b}' the government, and August 12, 1862, 
he enlisted in Company K, Seventy-fifth 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, a company raised 
at West Paw Paw, and in which his two 
brothers, Benjamin 1-". and Zora, also en- 
listed. The regiment was assigned to the 
Army of the Cumberland, and participated 
in many engagements during its term of 
service. In the battle of Perry\ille, Ken- 
tucky, October 8, 1862, it lost two iiundred 



and forty-five men, and among the killed 
was Zora Atherion, and among the wounded 
was Benjamin F. Atherton. Among the 
other engagements in which the regiment 
participated, were Stone River, Liberty Gap, 
Tullahoma, Chickamauga, Lookout Moun- 
tain and Mission Ridge. At Lookout Moun- 
tain the company of our subject was on 
the wagon road skirmish line. Later the 
regiment was at Ringgold, and following 
was in the siege and surrender of Atlanta. It 
was in all the battles in the campaign from 
Chattanooga to the surrender of Atlanta in 
1864. On the way down it was in the fight 
at Dalton, and returning was in the fight at 
Franklin, and also at Nashville, together 
with a great many lesser fights and skir- 
mishes. From the 24th of November, 
1862, our subject was never off duty nor 
lost any time from sickness. He was dis- 
charged at Chicago, July 4, 1865, and re- 
turned to his home and resumed his place 
upon the farm. 

\N'hile still in the service, December 19, 
1864, his wife died, leaving one son, Harry 
Lincoln, now grown and married, and en- 
gaged as a telegraph operator in Oklaho- 
ma. In Lee county, Illinois, December 
10, 1865, Mr. Atherton married Miss F^lea- 
nor Stone, a native of New York state, 
who came west with her father, William 
Stone, who was one of the pioneers of De- 
Kalb county, and who now resides at East 
Paw Paw. .After marriage, he located on 
a forty-acre tract, which he purchased ad- 
joining the farm where he now resides, and 
there engaged in farming until 1869, when 
he rented the place and moved to Califor- 
nia, where he purchased one hundred and 
sixt\' acres of land and engaged in raising 
grain. Ill luck attended him, the dry 
we.ither ruining two crops, but the third 



36 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



year he raised a fine crop, but having enough 
of California, in 1872, he returned to De 
Kalb county, and purchased one hundied 
and thirty acres of his father's old place, 
and so'iie years later purchased the remain- 
der, and has there since been active!}' en- 
gaged in fanning. 

In 1883 Mrs. Atherton died. By the 
last marriage there were five children. Ad- 
die grew to womanhood, married, bat is 
now deceased. Ralph L. is married and en- 
gaged in farming in Lee county. Benjamin 
F. enlisted in the Third Illinois \'olunteer 
Infantry as a member of Company M, in 
the late war with Spain. Wilbur A. C. is 
assisting in carrying on the home farm. 
Jonathan \V. resides with his parents. 

Politically Mr. .•\therton was a Repub- 
lican for many years, then a Greenbacker 
and later a Prohibitionist, but in 1896 sup- 
ported Bryan and free silver. For three 
years he served assessor of his township, and 
for five years was school director of his dis- 
trict. In the fifty-five years of his residence 
in De Kalb county he has made many 
warm friends and few enemies. 



WILLIAM BLAIR is a retired farmer 
residing in the village of Malta. He 
was born in Barrickshire, Scotland, Febru- 
ary 28, 1824, and is the son of Robert and 
Jane fDickson) Blair, both of whom were 
natives of the same shire. Robert Blair 
was by trade a weaver, but handlooms be- 
ing superseded by machinery, he abandoned 
his trade and engaged in farming. Our 
subject coming to this country in 1851, his 
parents followed him the next year, locat- 
ing at St. Charles, -Illinois, where they re- 
sided two years, when they removed to Du 
Page county, Illinois, and remained three 



years, after which they came to De Kalb 
county, wlicre they resided during the re- 
mainder of their li\'es. Robert Blair died 
Ma\- 4, 1891, at the age of ninet\--three 
years, while his wife died August 6, 1876, 
in her seventy-ninth year. Their family 
consisted of nine children, of whom five 
grew to maturit}', William being third in 
order of birth. 

William Blair was reared and educated 
in his native countr\', and five years prior 
to his emigration to America he ser\-ed as a 
tobacconist and chandler. He was twenty- 
seven years of age wlien he left his native 
land and came to America. After residing 
here for a time he sent for his parents, and 
on their arrival cared for them during the 
remainder of their lives. In May, 1857, he 
bought a farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres in Mihn township, to which he soon 
added eighty more acres, and still later pur- 
chased one hundred and fi\'e acres, making 
hiin a fine farm of three hundred and forty- 
five acres. All this was in its wild state 
when purchased, but now it is handsomely 
improved and supplied with all that is mod- 
ern in the farming world. He was an all 
around farmer, confining himself to no par- 
ticular line, but was a success in whatever 
he undertook. In 1891 he built a cream- 
ery on his place, which was run by his son 
John until 189S, when, the labor required 
in running both creamery and farm being 
too great, he disposed of the former to some 
Chicago parties. The output of butter 
manufactured was quite large. 

On November 13 1856, Mr. Blair was 
joined in marriage with Miss Mary McNeil, 
daughter of John and Mary McNeil, both 
natives of Scotland, who came to this coun- 
try in August, 1855. By this union six 
children have been born, all of whom are 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



yet living, nameh': Robert H,, John N., 
Mary J., Alice. D. and Edith. 

In politics Mr. Blair is a Republican, 
and has been honored with nearly all the 
offices the citizens of his township could 
bestow upon him. He and his wife are 
consistent members of the Congregational 
church. 



GEORGE WOOD, a retired blacksmith 
residing in De Kalb, was born at East 
Lothain, Scotland, September 9, 1818. His 
parents, Robert and Beatrice (Thorn) Wood, 
were natives of Scotland, and lived and died 
on their native soil. They were honest, up- 
right and industrious paople. Robert died 
in 1848, at the age of sixty-six years, his 
wife surviving him until i 87S, dying at the 
age of eighty-five years. Their family con- 
sisted of eight children, three of whom are 
now living: Robert, a resident of New 
Zealand; John, residing in New York; and 
George, our subject. 

The subject of this sketch resided in 
Lothain, Scotland, until he reached his 
fifteenth year, when he removed to the 
county of Edinboro, where he served an ap- 
prenticeship at the blacksmith's trade, though 
a part of the time working in the city of 
Edinburgh. In that county he continued 
to remain, working as a journeyman black- 
smith, up to 1851, at which time he em- 
barked for the United States. Arriving in 
New York, he remained in that state for 
four years. In 1855, he removed to May- 
field, Illinois, where he remained one year, 
and in 1856 moved to De Kalb, where he 
opened a shop on Main street. Since locat- 
ing in De Kalb, he has been quite success- 
ful and has hammered out on his anvil 
some vahiable cit)- property. He now owns 



ii\c: choice lots, upon two of which are ex- 
cellent dwellings, one being occupied by 
himself. In 1896, he sold his shop and 
tools to Thomas Thompson, since which 
time he has lived a retired life. 

In December, 1839, Mr. Wood married 
Miss Jeannette King, a native of Scotland, 
born in 1800, and a daughter of Adam King. 
She died at De Kalb, Illinois, in 1858, in 
her fifty-ninth year. For his second wife, 
in December, 1859, Mr. Wood married 
Flora Bennett, a nati\e of Ireland, born at 
Sanfield, in 1823, and a daughter of John 
and Elizabeth McKee, who emigrated to 
Canada, in an early da_\', where the father 
died. Subsequently the mother and chil- 
dren removed to the United States, locating 
in De Kalb, where Mrs. McKee died April 
24, 1875. at the age of eighty- five years. 
By this second union four children were 
born: Jennie, born February 7, i860; Rob- 
ert, born May 27, 1861, died in T878; Belle, 
born April 21, 1863; and Joseph, July 7, 
1865. Mr. and Mrs. Wood are members 
of the Congregational church and are con- 
scientious people, having many friends in 
De Kalb. 



EDWIN P. SMITH, a retired farmer, re- 
siding in the city of Sycamore, is a 
native of De Kalb county, born in Mayfield 
township, January 19, 1843. His father; 
Spafford Smith, was born in Windsor, Ver- 
mont, May 18, 1809. He remained under 
the parental ro )f until seventeen years of 
age, when he left home to learn the carpen- 
ter's trade. He married Eliza Sholes,,June 
9, 1835, and four years later came- to De. 
Kalb county. She was the daughter of 
Prentiss Sholes, of Clearmont, New Hamp- 
shire, who was a farmer by occupation and 



138 



THi: HIOCRAPHICAI. RECORD. 



who died in his iiatue state. On his arrival 
in I)e Kalb count}', Spafford Smith stopped 
(or a lime in Sycamore, which then com- 
prised but \ery few houses, and he was only 
able to get one room in the city hotel. .-\t 
that time there were six families doing like- 
wise. He worked as a carpenter on the 
hotel and other buildings until the following 
spring, when he moved to his farm in May- 
tield township, and for se\erai years li\ed 
in a log house. Chicago, sixty miles awaj , 
was his trading point. For some years 
after his arrival Shabb(jna, with his tribe 
(if Indians, were often seen in the vicinity. 
For thirt}- \ears he lived upon his farm in 
Ma> field township, but in 1S70 moved to 
the city of Sycamore, where the remainder 
of his life was spent He became a \er\- 
prosperous man, and at one time was the 
owner of four farms, two of two hundred 
and sixty acres, one of one hundred and 
eighty-three acres, and one of three hundred 
and ten acres. His death occurred in 1895, 
at the age of eighty-six years. He came of 
a long-lived family. His father served in 
the war of 181 2. The grandfather was 
twice married, Spafford and Curtis Smith, 
who came west together, being children b}' 
the second wife. .A half-brother of Spafford 
heard of the latter living in Sycamore, 
through a gentleman from that city travel- 
ing on a train in the west. He wrote to 
him and visited with him in 1889, after a 
separation of seventy years. The mother 
of our subject, who was born in 1800. died 
|anuar\- 31, 1881. 

Edwin P. Smith, our subject, was reared 
in his native township, and there resided 
until 1892, a period of forty-nine years 
He attended the district school until the 
age of twenty years, and spent two years 
ui the schools of Sycamore and one 3ear 



in a pri\ate school. He remained with 
his father until the age of twenty-six years, 
when he married and took charge of the 
old farm, his parents shortl}' after mov- 
ing t(j Sycamore. After operating the farm 
for some years, his father gave to him a 
deed to the place, retaining an annuity for 
life. He was married on the 6th of January, 
1870. in Mas field township, to Miss Flora 
M. joiner, a native of that township, and 
fifth in a family of six children born to 
Cyrus S. and Elmira (Lyon) Joiner, the for- 
mer a native of \\'olcott, Wayne county, 
New York, born Ootober 5. 18(3, and who 
at the age of sixteen went to Allegany 
county. New York, but who was married in 
Chautauqua county, that state, April 24, 
1836. He came to Ue Kalb county in 1837, 
and located in Mayfield township, becoming 
one of its pioneer citizens. By this union 
one son was born, Albert P., born on the 
farm November 8, 1870, and who now lives 
in Denver, Colorado, where he is engaged 
in the coal, wood and ice business. He is 
a fine amateur photographer, and is also 
very skillful with fine tools, and being quite 
artistic, he has manufactured for his own 
family and friends a number of pieces of fine 
inlaid work. He built a large hall clock of 
wahuit, inlaid with beautiful figures of white 
wood. It is a small clock, and as tine as 
anything that e\er came from Switzerland. 
His education was obtained at Lombard 
University, Galesburg, Illinois, from which 
he was graduated in 1894, and the following 
year took up his residence in Denver. He 
is a member of the Universalist church. 

In politics our subject is a Republican, 
and has served as road commissioner and 
school director. He is a substantial farmer 
and good business man, and has three hun- 
dred and ten acres in iMa}'Held township, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



139 



which is well improved in ever)' lespect. 
Both he and his wife come from fine old 
New England families, dating back in colo- 
nial da\s. As a citizen he is enterprising, 
and is e\er ready to do his part in promot- 
ing the material interests of his nati\e 
county and state. 



GEORGE N. LUCAS, M. U. , is a well- 
known physician and surgeon of Malta, 
Illinois. There is no profession or calling 
more sacred than that of the plusician. He 
stands on the threshold of time and ushers 
man into the world; he assists him in the 
observance of nature's laws all through life, 
and, at its close, helps him down the steep 
declivit}', smoothing his pathway and mak- 
ing his exit easy, as he again passes back to 
the unknown. The man who proclaims a 
written law is no higher or hoher than he who 
teaches the observance of the unwritten law 
of the Almighty. We revere the learned and 
eloquent divine, but no less the experienced 
and cultured physician. Whatever art or 
profession aids humanity to be true to itself 
and the laws of nature, that takes up the 
brittle and often shattered threads of life, 
making it to perform its proper functions, 
is noble, philanthropic, divine. It is with 
pleasure, therefore, that we write the sketch 
of Dr. George N. Lucas, a man who is self- 
made in the true sense of the term. 

Dr. Lucas was born at Quaker Hill, In- 
diana, March 25, i860, and is the son of 
George and Emily (Henderson) Lucas, the 
f< rmer a native of Uniontown, Pennsylva- 
nia, and the latter of Quaker Hill, Indiana. 
Shortly after the birth of our subject, they 
removed from Quaker Hill, Indiana, to 
Texas, where the husband and father died, 
at the age of twenty-four years, when 



George was but six months old. After the 
death of her husband, Mrs. Lucas returned 
to Indiana, where, later, she was again 
married, but died in 1871. This advent 
threw the boy on the world without the 
protecting influence of a mother's love, the 
ties of which are often tested, but never 
broken, for "No love like mother's love 
ever was known." Mrs. Lucas was reared 
among those peace-loving people known as 
Friends, whose habits of life are proverbial 
for their strictness in those christian princi- 
ples upon which rest true manhood. She 
was known and respected for her true 
\\orth, upright character and pure life. 

After the death of his mother, our sub- 
ject went to the home of his grandfather, 
Henry Lucas, at Whitestown, Boone coun- 
ty, Indiana, where he remained until 1874. 
The panic of 1873 pro\ing ruinous to his 
grandfather's business, at the age of four- 
teen he was thrown entirely upon his own re- 
sources, and at once saw the necessity of 
striking out in life for himself. For the 
space of ten years he worked at various vo- 
cations in various places, as any boy would 
under similar circumstances. .All this time, 
however, he was looking to the develop- 
ment of the intellectual man by attending 
school at every opportunit)'. Up to the 
time he attained his majority the most of 
his schooling was received in Boone and 
Putnam counties, Indiana. He then en- 
tered the high school at Lebanon, Indiana, 
where he spent some time in fitting himself 
for future usefulness. In 1874 he removed 
to Indianapolis, Indiana, where he was em- 
ployed in the Hospital for the Insane, but 
on account of the treatment of patients, 
which did not agree with his tastes, he 
abandoned thesituation. He next repaired 
to Elgin, Illinois, where, through high influ- 



I40 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ence, he obtained a similar situation, dur- 
ing which time he ser\ed also as attendant 
and assistant 5uper\i3or, and also as night 
watchman. .At the e.xpiration of three 
years he obtained a position in the watch 
factory where he remained for fi\e years. 
Turning his attention to higher attainments, 
after mature thought and deliberate consid- 
erati<Mi, he entered the College of Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons, in the University of 
Illinois, at Chicago, from which institution 
he was graduatetl with honors in 1895. 

On March 25, 1888, Dr Lucas whs 
united in marriage with Miss Lucy \i. 
Hlackbiun, daughter .>f Frank and Eliza 
Blackburn, of .Manchester, Illinois, and by 
this union two sons have been born, Frank 
in 1890, and Edwin in 1892. Mrs. Lucas 
was born at Mnrrayville, Illinois, .March 30, 
1866. 

Immediatel\ after his graduation, Ur. 
Lucas established himself at Malta, where 
he has now a large and increasing practice. 
He possesses those social qualities which 
mark the successful man. His conversa- 
tional powers are good with enough of hu- 
mor to make him a genial companion. 



LEONARD AURNER, agriculturist, re- 
sidingon section 22, Kingston township, 
is one of the pioneers of this section whose 
name and history is well known all over De 
Kalb county. He was born in Armstrong 
county, Pennsylvania, July 6, 1810, and is 
the son of Henry and Elizabeth Aurner, 
both natives of Pennsylvania, and who re- 
moved to De Kalb county, Illinois, some 
time later than their son Leonard. Leon- 
and .\urner justly comes 'of his good old 
age, his father dying in 1852, at the age of 



ninety-eight jears, while the mother died 
in 1856, at the age of ninety-two years. 

Leonard Aurner removed from Michi- 
igan to Illinois, in 1838, locating on section 
22, Kingston township. He purchased one 
huiulred and si.\ty acres of a Mr. Taylor, of 
Cfiicago, and t(j this he added at various 
times until he had some fi\'e hundred acres 
of excellent farming land. Some of this he 
lias since sold, and some has been given to 
his children. He was appointed the first 
trustee of the hist school taught in this dis- 
trict, which was in 1840, Miss Haniel Rus- 
sell oHiciating. 

Mr. .\urner was hrst married in St. Jo- 
seph county. Michigan, ill 1836, to Miss Mar- 
garet W. Dibble, a daughter of James and 
Doll\' Dibble, and to this um'oii was born 
nine chiklren, se\en of whom are \et living: 
Orlando J., Eliza C, William R., Harriet 
L., Charl'es L , Joseph F. and Marquis D. 
Mrs. Aurner died in De Kalb count)', Sep- 
tember 26, 1864, at the age of fifty-two 
years. She was born iu Delaware county, 
New York, .August 13, 1812, and was a true 
helpmeet to her husband. For his second 
wife Mr. Aurner married a Mrs. Snyder, 
of Sycamore, ami for his third a Mrs. Burg- 
heart, of De Kalb. By the last two mar- 
riagesthere are no children. I>oth are now- 
deceased. 

Mr. .\urner has li\ed an h(jnest and up- 
right life, respected and honored among all 
men, and dealing squarely with whomever 
he came in contact. His e.xperience in the 
county has been \'aried and interesting, and 
he is truly the architect of his own fortune. 
He has been a Repulilicaii since the organi- 
zation of the party and lias tilled many 
offices of honor and trust to the entire satis- 
faction of all concerned. When younger 
he was engaged in the mercantile business 



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LEONARD AURNER. 

Aged 88 Years. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



in Chapmanville for a number of years, but 
of late has been living quietly under the 
roof which has sheltered him so long. 

His daughter, Harriet L. , was born in 
Kingston township, February 8, 1846, and 
in 1866 was united in marriage with S. 
Keppel, of Kingston, and to them six chil- 
dren were born, three of whom are now liv- 
ing: Minnie A., born at Kingston, February 
21, 1872; John M., April 27, 1876; and 
Lida B., November 16, 1880. They re- 
moved in 1866, to Topeka, Kansas, but 
subsequently removed to Montgomery coun- 
ty, that state, where Mr. Keppel founded 
the town of Elk City, and where he was a 
very prominent merchant. He was obliged 
on account of failing health to abandon the 
mercantile business, and went to Miles City, 
Montana, in an effort to regain waning 
health, but it was in vain, and at that place, 
April 5, 1887, he passed away to the better 
home. 

On December 25, 1888, Mrs. Keppel 
was joined in wedlock with T. A. Shorey, 
a farmer, whose demise occurred May 17. 
1890. Shortly after this bereavement, Mrs. 
Shorey sold out her interest in the property 
and came to Kingston, where she has since 
remained under the old roof which protected 
her in days of yore. Her daughter, Minnie 
A., was united in marriage to C. C. Smith, 
January 7, 1895, ^"cl to them three children 
have been born, Harland L. , Helen C. and 
Fay. 



CHAUNCY H. WILDER, M. D.— There 
can be no greater honor conferred upon 
man than the title of M. D. Trained must 
be his nerve, tender and delicate his touch, 
deep must be his study and wide must be 
his range of thought and knowledge to 



acquire it. There is no more responsible 
position or profession than that of the physi- 
cian, the man who aids dame nature in 
weavmg together the brittlt- and often shat- 
tered strands of the thread of life. If true 
to his calling, he must be in love with his 
profession. He must be as much m har- 
mony with the eternal laws of Jeho\-ah as 
the man who proclaims from the sacred 
desk the oracles of the almighty. Dr. 
Wilder is }et a young man, but he has that 
true love for the profession that should 
animate the hearts of all engaged in it. He 
is a native of Independence. Missouri, born 
October 21, 1865, and is the son of Chauncy 
H. and Elizabeth (Hurlbert) Wilder, the 
former a native of \'ermont and the latter 
of Illinois. 

Chauncy H. Wilder, Sr. , the father of 
our subject, was a man of natural and 
acquired abilities. While residing in Ver- 
mont, he was postmaster of his native town 
for several years. In 1S44, he accom- 
panied his father, Oliver Wilder, to Win- 
nebago county, Illinois, where the family 
resided until May, 1863, when Oliver 
Wilder passed to his reward. His wife fol- 
lowed him just two years later, in May. 1865. 
Oliver Wilder was a prosperous farmer, and 
was loyal to his country, serving it faithfully 
and well in the war of 1812 with Great 
Britain. The father of Oliver was Ransom 
Wilder, a native of Massachusetts, and a 
brave soldier in the Revolutionary war. He 
was a direct descendant of one of three 
brothers who emigrated from England, with 
a widowed mother, Martha Wilder, who 
landed in Massachusetts bay in 1638 and 
from whom it is supposed all the Wilders 
in the United States descended. One of the 
family was made a baron in 1497 by Henry 
^TI, who gave him a land grant. After the 



144 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



death of his parents, Chauncy H. Wilder, 
Sr., remo\ed from Winnebago county, Illi- 
nois, to Independence, Missouri, where he 
soon contracted a disease which resulted in 
his death in i86S. After his death his 
widow with her taniil_\- of little ones re- 
turned to their old home in Winnebago 
count}-, Illinois, where Martin \'. B. Wilder 
then resided, and where she died the same 
year. The family consisted of eight chil- 
dren, six of whom are now living, Chauncy 
H. being the youngest. 

Dr. \\'ilder was only two years of age 
when his parents died. His imcle. Martin 
\'. r>. Wilder, then adopted him into hi.s 
own family, where he shared alike with the 
children of his adopted father, Iti this 
home m the city of De Kalb, Illinois, the 
Doctor recei\-ed his first training, and in the 
public schools of the city received his edu- 
cation, assisting at odd times his foster 
father, who was one of De Kalb's promi- 
nent merchants. He assisted in the store 
and attended school until he reached his 
twenty-first year. In 1886, he remo\'ed to 
California, where one of his brothers re- 
sided. He there remained three years, dur- 
ing which time he was employed as a clerk 
and in mercantile business. In 1890, he 
returned to De Kalb, where he engaged as 
a clerk for the firm of Oleson Wilder, 
with whom he remained one year, after 
which he went to Chicago and began the 
study of medicine under Dr. James A. 
Clark, formerly of De Kalb, of the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons, and where he 
remained four years, three years of which 
time he held the position of house sur^^eon, 
which opened up to his mind a large and, 
as yet to him, an unexplored field of science. 
His experience there w^as varied, but all the 
time his education and training were ripen- 



ing. He firmly believed in the sentiment 
embodied in the words of Bryant, when he 
said: 

'■ Keep imshing; 'tis better than sitting aside, 
.And sighing and watching and waiting the tide. 
In hfe's earnest battles, they only prevail, 
Who daily march forward, and never say fail. " 

.-\fter four years of hard and earnest 
study, he graduated with high honors, re- 
turned to De Kalb, in 1895, and began the 
practice of medicine in his home town. 
While in California, the Doctor was united 
in marriage with Miss Adalla Aplin, a na- 
tive of Little York, California, born Decem- 
ber 9, 1865, and a daughter of Dr. \\'illiani 
D. and Mary L. Aplin. The marriage cer- 
emon_\- was celebrated August 6. 1889. 
They have one child, born September 2, 
1895- 

Dr. Aplin, the father of Mrs. Wilder, is 
a graduate of the Royal College of Surgery, 
of Manchester, England, and was in the 
employ of the English government previous 
to his coming to this country, in about 
1852. For a time he resided in Rhode 
Island, where he held a position as chemist. 
On his removal to California he was em- 
ployed by mining companies as assayist and 
chemist, and finally went into the mining 
business himself. He has, however, aban- 
doned the mining business, but for his 
health's sake still makes his home in Cali- 
fornia. 

•Martin Van Buren Wilder, whose name 
has been mentioned in this sketch, is 
worthy of a more extended notice. He 
was born in Jericho, Vermont, in 1836, 
and was a brother to Chauncy H. Wilder, 
Sr. , the father of our subject. In 1844 he 
came with his parents to Illinois, and in 
1857 went to Nebraska, where he engaged 
in mining. In 1 S60 he went to Colorado, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and from there to New Mexico, where he 
was Hving at the outbreak of the Civil war. 
Stirred by a spirit of patriotism, he enlisted 
in Company F, Fourth Ne\\' Mexico Volun- 
teer Infantry, which was subsequently 
transferred to the Second New Mexico Ca\- 
alry. He served all through the war and 
was honorably discharged in 1865, after 
spending eight years of camp life in various 
parts of the south and west. After the 
close of the war he moved to De Kalb, Illi- 
nois, and engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness, in which he continued until his death, 
in 1894. In 1864 he married Miss Clara 
Whitmore, who, with her three daughters, 
survive him. 

Dr. Wilder is an inveterate relic hunter, 
and has in his possession fifty different pat- 
terns of pistols, eleven kinds of muskets, 
some of which were used in the Revolu- 
tionary war, others in the Fenian raid, and 
soine in the Rebellion. Besides these he 
has knives, daggers, stilettoes and other 
curiosities. Each relic has its own histor\-, 
and the affable Doctor takes delight in ex- 
plaining in detail each in its order. The 
old Wilder home in Hingham, Massachu- 
setts, has remained unchanged for two 
centuries. The Doctor has a large and in- 
creasing practice, and his office and labora- 
tory are supplied with all the latest appli- 
ances. 



LEWIS FAMES, who resides on section 
17, Milan township, and whose post" 
office is Lee, Lee county, Illinois, owns 
and operates a farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres of well improved land. He is a 
native of Norway, born near the city of 
Stavanger, March 19, 184S, and is the son 
of Olc E;inies, also a nati\c (.)f Nor\\;iy, born 



in the same section, and a grandson of Ole 
Fames, Sr. , who was a well-to-do farmer of 
Norwa}'. Ole Eames, Jr., grew to man- 
hood in his native country, and there mar- 
ried Anna Turena Eames Goodmans, also 
a native of that country. I>v occupation 
Ole Eames was a farmer, and also was a 
dealer in cattle in his native country. He 
there raised his family and spent his entire 
life, dying when our subject was but nine 
years of age. Of their family of nine chil- 
dren, all grew to mature years, and of that 
number four sons and two daughters are yet 
living. 

Lewis Eames remained on the old home- 
stead until eighteen years of age, when he 
emigrated to the United States, accompan- 
ied by his brothers, Soren and Andrew, and 
sister, Hannah. His brother, Soren, had 
made a visit in i860, and made a location 
in La Salle county, Illinois. To that coun- 
ty the brothers all went on their arrival in 
this country, and there our subject com- 
menced work for Ezekiel Howland, at 
Prairie Center, and continued with him 
three years. He then went to Champaign 
county, rented land for a time and then pur- 
chased a farm near Urbana, which he sold 
— and lived on rented land some six years. 
In 1873 he came to De Kalb county, re- 
turned home, and selling out, again came 
to this county and purchased one hundred 
and sixty acres where he now resides. 
While the place was partially improved, he 
has since added greatly to its appearance 
by setting out an orchard and planting 
shade and ornamental trees and otherwise 
improving the place. 

Mr. Fames was married in De Kalb 
county, March 10, 1875, to Martha Peter- 
son, a native of De Kalb county, reared in 
Paw Paw lownshii\ ;.uid a daughter of 



46 



THE BIOCxRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Peter Peterson, one of the first settlers in 
the western part of the county. B}' this 
union there are nine children, eight of 
whom are j'et living as follows: Orrin 
Augustus, Peter Immanuel, Mabel Sophia, 
Leonard Mertin, Irving Silas, Lester jSIer- 
tin, \'erna Ruth, Ethel Agnes and Clarion 
Obed. All are living except Leonard Mer- 
tin, who died at the age of three years and 
five months. Orrin A. is a stenographer 
and is employed in Chicago. Mabel S. is 
now in Houston, Texas, taking lessons in 
music and also in elocution. The remamder 
of the children are at home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eames are members of the 
I^utheran church, in which he is one of the 
official members, and for some years has 
served as a deacon. Politically he is a Re- 
publican, and has given his support to that 
party since becoming a citizen of this coun- 
tr\'. He was elected and is now serving 
as conimi.-^sioner of highways. For some 
jeais he served as a member of the school 
board, giving much of his time to the ad- 
vancement of the public schools. He has 
ahva3-s manifested more or less interest in 
political affairs, and has been elected as a 
delegate to the conventions of his party. 
He is a wt-11 known citizen of Milan town- 
ship, and is held in the highest esteem. 



PATRICI\ A. McGIRR, who resides upon 
section 29, Afton township, is a repre- 
sentative farmer, one who has had lifelong 
experience in agricultural pursuits. He is a 
native of Afton township, born September 
23, 1862, and is the son ot John and Mary 
(^Powers) McGirr, of whom further mention 
is made in the sketch ol John McGirr. to 
be found elsewhere in this volume. In the 
district schools of Afton township our sub- 



ject received his primary education, which 
was supplemented by attending the schools 
of De Kalb and Chicago. For some years 
he has been engaged in the grain business 
at Carlton, Illinois, and also in the genera! 
mercantile trade, a business in which he has 
been \ery successful, his trade extending 
for many miles around. In 1897 he was 
appointed postmaster of the place and is 
still serving in that capacity to the satisfac- 
tion of all concerned. 

On the 14th of February, 1893, Mr. 
McGirr was united in marriage with Miss 
Ellen Minnehan, a native of Afton town- 
ship, and a daughter of Dennis and Marga- 
ret (Foy) Minnehan, who were natives of 
Ireland, and who are the parents of seven 
children. By this union there are two chil- 
dren, Gertrude, born November 18, 1893, 
and Margaret, born May 19, 1896. Fra- 
ternally Mr. McGirr is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias and Modern Woodmen 
of America. In politics he is a Democrat, 
having abiding faith in the principles of that 
party. He has never sought nor desired 
public office, but has served as assessor of 
his township, an office which he was well 
qualified to fill. Success has crowned his 
efforts in everything that he has undertaken, 
and in addition to his stock of general mer- 
chandise and means invested in grain busi- 
ness, he has two hundred and forty acres 
of valuable land, and is numbered among 
the well-to-do and progressive citizens of 
the township. 



JOHN WALKER, deceased, was for years 
one of the leading farmers of Malta 
township, and one of the worthy citizens of 
Lee county prior to his removal to De Kalb 
county, honest and upright in every respect, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



'4; 



He was a native of Scotland, born in Bute- 
shire, August 28, 1 8 14, and was the son of 
William and Jeannette ^^'alker, both of 
whom were also natives of Scotland. The 
life of a farmer in Scotland afforded no 
chance for advancement. One could not 
add to his material wealth, and a bare liv- 
ing was about all that could be obtained. 
Because of this fact, our subject determined 
to come to the New World, and in 1845 he 
left his native land, and came direct!}- to Illi- 
nois, locating in St. Charles, Kane county. 
After residing there a few years, he sent for 
his father's family, who joined him at that 
place. They purchased a farm near St. 
Charles, but account of reverses abandoned 
it, and in 1862 removed to Lee county, Illi- 
nois, where they purchased a quarter-sec- 
tion of wild prairie land. In course of time 
this became very valuable under their joint 
efforts, and two more quarter sections were 
added, which were later disposed of. 

On the 24th of November, 1843, Mr. 
Walker was united in marriage with Mifs 
Flora S. McNeil, who bore him thirteen 
children, nine of whom are yet living — Mary 
C, Jeannette P., William C, John M., 
Charles A., Joseph H., Flora J., Enmia B., 
Henry A. and Belle S. Mrs. Walker was 
born in Argyleshire, Scotland, in 1S25, and 
she was there married to Mr. Walker, and 
they spent three years of their wedded life 
in their native land, before coming to this 
country. She lived in sight of the farm 
upon which Robert Burns lived and worked, 
and often visited the cottage in which the 
great Scotch poet was born. Mrs. Walker 
is a woman of rare natural ability, ali\'e to 
every good word and work. 

Mr. Walker was a man highly esteemed 
by his fellow citizens, who elected him to 
all the offices of the township, which he 



tilled with credit to himself and friends. He 
was a member of the Congregational church, 
and served eight years as deacon of the 
church in Creston, Illinois. The family are 
also members of the Congregational church. 
His death occurred October 31, 1893, in his 
seventy-ninth year. His friends were many 
throughout Ivane, Lee and De Kalb coun- 
ties, and all held him in the highest respect. 



ALEXANDER RENNIE COURT is a 
retired farmer now residing in the city 
of Sycamore. He was born in Henderson 
township, Jefferson county. New York, March 
10, 1848. His great-grandfather, John 
Court, was a native of London, England, 
where his entire life was spent. He mar- 
ried a Miss Gibson, and died at the age of 
ninety years. His son, Henry Court, Sr. , 
also a native of London, England, came to 
America, with his famil}-, in 1836, sailing 
from London, in the ship Philadelphia, be- 
ing forty-four days cii route, and landing in 
New York. His son, Henry Court. Jr., the 
father of our subject, was born in London, 
England, July 7, 1823. and came to the 
United States with his parents at the age of 
thirteen years. He grew to manhood in 
Jefferson county. New York, and at Ant- 
werp, married Lovira Cross, a native of 
Jefferson county, New York, and a daughter 
of Enoch and Betsey (Britton) Cross, the 
former a native of Keene, New Hampshire. 
They became the parents of four children, 
of whom our subject is second in order of 
birth. 

The subject of this sketch spent his boy- 
hood and youth in Jefferson county. New 
York, on the old farm on Henderson Bay, 
near Sacketts Harbor. His time was spent 
principally on water, sailing, bathing and 



148 



TH] 



niOC.KAPHICAL RIXORD. 



fishing. In 1865, he came to De Kalb coun- 
ty, Illinois, with his parents, who settled in 
Sj'camore township. His education, began 
in his native county, was finished with three 
terms in the Sycamore schools. At the age 
of twent\-one he began farming on shares 
with his father. He married at the age of 
twenty-four, and soon after rented a farm 
near Charter Grove, which he operated for 
four years. In February, 1876, he went to 
Story county, Iowa, with two thousand 
eight hundred dollars incash, and purcHased 
one hundred acres of prairie and six acres 
of timlier land. In two years he saw clearly 
that he could do better in De Kalb county, 
as he was paying ten per cent, interest on 
borrowed money to carry on the place. 
What with poor crops, stock that he lost, 
and hard times generally, lie felt that it was 
for his interest to return, and coming back 
he worked one year for his father-in-law, 
then rented the John Woolsey farm, on 
which he remained for thirteen years. He 
then retired and came to S3'camore, buying 
his present residence in the winter of 1893, 
since which time he has followed carpenter- 
ing and painting when work came to his 
hand. 

Mr. Court was married December 31, 
1871, to Miss .\nn B. Dean, born in Xever- 
sink, Sullivan county. New York, and a 
daughter of Moses Dean, a native of the 
same place, born January 27. 1815, and who 
came west in 1856. In his native state 
Moses Dean followed the vocation of a 
farmer, taught school and kept a tavern. 
He acquired considerable property, some of 
which he rented. His emigration to the 
west was not until after the building of the 
railroad, and the journeys that required of 
the pioneers some weeks to make only re- 
quired of him about two days. On arriving 



in De Kalb county he settled in Charter 
Grove, where he purchased a farm and be- 
gan a prosperous career. He was a thrifty 
man, a good manager, acquired more land, 
loaned money and was regarded as one of 
the best financiers in the county. Moses 
Dean was a son of Solomon Dean, a native 
of England, settled near Hartford, Connect- 
icut, prior to the Revolutionary war, and 
who died at the age of one hundred and four 
years. His son. Solomon, born near Hart- 
ford, Connecticut, served through the Revolu- 
tionary war as a colonel under Washington. 
.\fter the war he married Elizabeth Brown, 
by whom he had two daughters and one son. 
The latter, Reuben Dean, moved to Never- 
sink. New York, where he died December 
[6, 1845, ^^ the age of sixty-one years. A 
patriot like his father, he served in the war 
of 1812. Reuben Dean married Elizabeth 
Devine, a daughter of Eleazer Devine; and 
they became the parents of Moses Dean, the 
father of Mrs. Court. Moses Dean married 
Rachel Evans, a daughter of George and 
Mary (EUer) Evans. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Court five children 
have been born — Eliza, Henry A., Albert, 
Moses A. and Delia Elizabeth. Of these 
Eliza died at the age of thirteen months 
and Albert in infanc}-. Mrs. Court is a 
member of the Universalist church, which 
Mr. Court also attends. 



SEPTIMUS STOREY has been a resi- 
dent of DeKalb county since the fall of 
1852. He was born in Harthill, Yorkshire, 
England, February 10, 1829, and grew to 
mature years in his native county, where he 
received a limited education, and in his boy- 
hood worked for a time in the manufacture 
of nails. His father, Barnabee Story, was 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECOI 



also a native of Yorkshire, England, as was 
his father before him. For several genera- 
tions the male members of the family en- 
gaged in nail making. Barnabee Story mar- 
ried Sarah Widdeson, a natixe of Derby- 
shire, England, and their entire lives were 
spent in their native country. 

The subject of this sketch came to the 
United States in 1850, in company with 
Joseph Billam and ^^'illiaIl) Cutts, both 
young men. They took ship at Li\-erpool, 
and were about twenty-four days in making 
the voyage, encountering in that time one 
severe storm, which damaged the sails of the 
ship to some extent. On arriving in New 
York Mr. Storey went up the Hudson to 
Albany, thence by rail to Buffalo, and the 
lakes to Chicago. From Chicago he went 
to Kendall county, where he joined some 
English friends and commenced work on a 
farui at ten dollars per month, continuing 
to be thus employed for one year. The 
next year he rented some land in Big Gro\e 
township, Kendall county, and secured one 
crop. In the fall of iS^i he came to De 
Kalb county, and purchased forty acres of 
land. Three of his friends owned one hun- 
dred and si.xty acres, and they worked 
together to improve the tract, continuing 
thus engaged for two years. Mr. Storey 
then bought the share of William Cutts on 
section 17, to which he removed and erected 
a small frame house, in which he lived while 
developing the farm. He later, bought 
eighty acres adjoining, which had been 
somewhat improved, and in due time built 
a larger resideiice, two good barns, tiled the 
place and enclosed a part of the barn with 
a fine hedge fence. From time to time he 
added to his possessions until he now owns 
six hundred and forty acres in one body. 
He previously owned one hundred and sixty 



acres nearby, which he sold to his son. 
Up to 1894 he was actively engaged in 
farming and was recognized as one of the 
most enterprising farmers of the township, 
as well as a large breeder and dealer in 
shorthorn cattle and Poland-China hogs. 
In 1894 he moved to Shabbona, after having 
erected one of the best residences in the 
place, and has since lived a retired life. 

Mr. Storey was married in De Kalb 
county, December 23, 1856, to Miss Mary 
Mullen, a native- of Derbyshire. England, 
who came to the United States a child of 
thirteen years, and a daughter of Robert 
and Sarah ( Uyllett) Mullen, who were among 
the early settlers of Shabbona township, De 
Kalb county. By this union there are se\-en 
children, five sons and two daughters. John 
L., Charles E. and William H. are each 
engaged in farming in Shabbona township. 
George T. is one of the leading merchants 
of the village of Shabbona. De Forrest L. 
IS with his brother, William H., engaged in 
tarming on the old homestead. .Sarah E. 
is the wife of Har\-ey Green, a farmer of 
Scranton township. Green county, Iowa. 
Lilly M. yet remains at home. They lost 
two children. Robert M. and Anna M. both 
dying when about three years of age. 

Politically Mr. Storey is a stanch Re- 
publican, his first presidential ballot being 
cast for Abraham Lincoln, in i860. He 
was elected and served as a member of the 
school-board for sixteen years, three years 
as road commissioner, and five years, at 
different times, as supervisor. While a 
member of the county board he served on 
the personal propert)- committee, and of 
highways and printing, being chairman of 
the latter committee. Since moving to 
Shabbona, he served two years as a member 
of the \illage trustees. In e\-ery position 



I ^o 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



to which he has been elected he has dis- 
charged the duties in a faithful and efficient 
manner. In the various conventions of his 
part)', count}', district and state, he has 
often served as a delegate. 

Mr. and Mrs. Storey are members of the 
West Shabbona Methodist Episcopal church, 
of which Mr. Storey has officially served for 
many years. For almost half a century Mr. 
Storey has been a resident of Illinois, forty- 
eight years of which time a resident of De 
Kalb count)'. Coming to this count)' a poor 
man, by his industry and thrifty habits he has 
become independent financially, and can 
well afford to take a well-earned rest, know- 
ing that he has the esteem and confidence 
of the entire community in which he has 
resided so many years. 



EDWARD M. BURST, the present city 
attorne)' of Sycamore, is a native of 
the city, born January i, 1872. He here 
grew to manhood, and in its public schools 
received his literary education. Early evinc- 
ing a desire to make the legal profession his 
life work, in 1S90, he entered the law de- 
partment of the Michigan University at Ann 
Arbor, from which he was graduated in 
June, 1892, with the degree of LL. B., and 
was admitted to practice the same year, in 
the courts of Michigan. In 1893, he en- 
tered the law office of Caldwell & Pierson, 
of Chicago, where he remained about one 
year, and then returned to Sycamore, 
opened an office in the room occupied b\' 
Judge L. Lowell, and began the practice of 
his profession. His professional qualities 
attracted the attention of the people of the 
city, and in 1895 he was elected to serve 
them as city attorney, and was re-elected 
in 1S97. \Miiie in politics he is a Repub- 



lican, he was elected the first term by the 
independent voters and to the second term 
on the citizens ticket. In 1892, he was one 
of the delegates from Illinois to the Na- 
tional Republican League, held at Buffalo, 
New York. 

John W. Burst, the father of our sub- 
ject, was born in Delaware county. New 
York. He is a veteran of the Civil war, 
and is held in high regard b)' his fellow 
comrades. 

Captain Burst was one of the earliest to 
jom the G. A. R., having been mustered 
into Ransom Post, Chicago, in 1866. He 
was transferred to the post in Sycamore, 
Illinois, in 1874, and was its commander for 
several years. He was very active in build- 
ing up the order in Illinois, and besides 
holding many subordinate positions was 
senior vice-commander, and commander of 
the department. He served for several years 
on the G. A. R. National Pension Commit- 
tee, and did effective work in the formula- 
tion and passage of the disability bill. He 
has been three times the candidate of the 
department of Illinois for commander-in- 
chief of the Grand Army of the Republic. 
His appointment b\' Commander-in-Chief 
Lawler as quartermaster-general met the 
enthusiastic approval of thousands of per- 
sonal friends among the comrades. 

During the campaign of 1896, Captain 
Burst was a part of the aggregation made 
up of crippled veterans of the war for the 
union that made a tour of the country in 
the interest of the Republican party. In 
the party were Generals Sickles, Howard, 
Stewart, Corporal Tanner and others. Soon 
after his election President McKinley ap- 
pointed Captain Burst United States mi- 
migration inspector, with headquarters at 
Chicago, which position he now holds. 




EDWARD M. BURST. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



53 



Captain Burst married Lettice Mayi5, a 
daughter of Hon. Edward L. and Emily 
(Holden) Mayo. Her father settled at Syca- 
more, Illinois, in 1841, and for many years 
was the acknowledged leader of the bar of 
De Kalb county. As a lawyer and a man, 
he was prominently identified with its early 
history. He was born in Morctown, Wash- 
ington county, \ermont, in 1S07, and while 
his advantages in earlv life were limited, he 
obtained a fail- education. His friends tried 
to persuade him to enter the ministry, hut 
he chose the law, and was admitted to the 
bar in 1835. He was twice married, iiis 
first vi'ife being Miss Lettice Ann Holden, 
who died shortly afterward, when in Sep- 
tember, 11^40, he married Miss Emily Hold- 
en, her cousin. In politics he was a Demo- 
crat, and in 1X54 was the candidate of that 
party for congress, but was defeated, the 
district being strongly Republican. He was 
three times elected county judge, notwith- 
standing his politics, and the fact that he 
belonged to a part}' casting the mmority 
vote. He was en intimate terms rif friend- 
ship with the leading men of the state, 
among them being Stepiien .\. Douglas, 
judge John D. Caton and L^irjan Trumbull. 
After i860, he was a "war Democrat," m 
full sympath}' with the union cause. His 
integrity and honor were never questioned. 
Possessed of a legal mind, it was among his 
legal brethren who knew him best and were 
best able to judge, that he was most appre- 
ciated. He died in De Kalb, November 16, 
1877, at the age of seventy years, leaving a 
widow and one son, Dr. E. L. Mayo, of De 
Kalb, and three daughters, Mrs. John W. 
Burst, of Sycamore; Mrs. T. E. Bagley, of 
Genoa; and Miss Kate Mayo, of De Kalb, 
surviving. To Captain and Mrs. Burst, 
three children were born — Edward M., the 



subject of this sketch; Bessie, wife of Henr\- 
\N'. Prentice, an attorne\- of De Kalb; and 
Bertha C. 

Edward M. Burst, the subject of this 
sketch, is an earnest and active member of 
the Republican part>'. In 1898 here-ar- 
ranged and revised the city ordinances. 
Fraternalls' he is a member of the Foresters, 
and in 1898 was elected chief ranger of 
Court Kishwaukee of Sycamore. He is a 
young man of fine character and future 
promise, and has already taken rank among 
the able members of the bar n{ De Kalb 
countv. 



THOMAS M. HOPKINS was for many 
years one of the leading attorneys in 
De Kalb county. He was born in the town 
of Salem, Washington county. New ^'ork, 
.\pril 23, 1 818, and was the son of Hiram 
and Sarah (McClar\-i Hopkins, also natives 
of the town of Sah-in. Hiram Hopkins was 
a man of considerable prominence in Saletn, 
but with a view of bettering his condition 
in life, he came west anil located in .Aurora. 
Illinois, in the early settlement of that place. 
Thomas M. Hopkins, our subject, was 
reared in his native town and educated in 
its public schools, completing his studies 
with three years at Washington Academy. 
In 1835, ^^hen but seventeen years of age, 
he commenced the study <^f law, and Janu- 
ary, 1842, was admitted to the bar by the 
supreme court of the state, at Albany, New 
York, Judge Samuel Nelson presiding. At 
Salem he began the practice of his profes- 
sion and there continued one year. In 1843 
he came to Illinois, and after spending one 
summer in this state, went to Missouri, 
where he resided until February. 1846, 
when he came to De Kalb county aufl en- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tered a claim on section 13, De Kalb town- 
ship, afterward entering the same from the 
general government. He at onre com- 
menced improving the land, erecting there- 
on a dwelhng and m cessar}' outbuildings 
and for some yeais engaged in general farm- 
ing. 

On the 23d of April, 1846, Mr. Hopkins 
was joined in marriage with Miss Julia .\. 
Hawken, a daughter of Jacob Hawken, a 
native of Hngerstown, Maryland, from which 
place he removed with his family to St. 
Louis, Missouri, where the remainder of his 
life was passed, dying at the age of sixty 
years. His wife died when thirty-five years 
old. To Mr. and Mrs. Hopki.is five children 
were born. Montgomery, who is a farmer, 
was born October 16, 1847. Charles O.. also 
a farmer by occupation, was born October 2, 
1849. Christopher M , born September i, 
1853, is a physician residing in Iowa. Alice 
C. (now Mrs. Bradt) was born December 
19, 1855. Jacob H., a leading attorney in 
Chicago, was born May 3, 1865. 

On first coming to the state Mr. Hopkins 
applied for admission to the bar of Illinois 
and was duly licensed to practice May 2 
1843, by the supreme court of the state 
Chief Justice Caton and Judge Richard M. 
Young presiding. On his return to the state 
in 1846, in connection w'ith farming, he en- 
gaged in general practice. In 1865 he 
moved into the village of De Kalb, opened 
a law office and devoted his whole time to 
the legal profession. He was a man of 
marked gifts and powers, thoroughly versed 
in his profession. His familiarity with all 
the laws, rules and regulations of the va- 
rious courts enabled him to maintain a po- 
sition in the front ranks of his profession, 
and it was admitted by all that he was one 
of the best members of the bar in De Kalb 



county. His many clients bore testimonj' 
to his zeal and success in furthering their 
interests. Socially he was large-hearted 
and benevolent in the e.xtreme. He passed 
away in 1888 at the age of se\'enty years, 
mourned by many friends and missed b\' all. 



HH. HOPKINS, a representative busi- 
ness man of Hinckley and De Kalb 
county, the superintendent and manager of 
e.\tensi\-e creameries in De Kalb, Kendall, 
Ogle and Lee counties, has been a resident of 
the county since 1880 and of Hinckley 
since 1884. He is a native of New Hamp- 
shire, born in Chesterfield, Cheshire county, 
July 2, 1861, and is the son of R. Henry 
Hopkins, a natix'e of the same state and 
county, who there grew to manhood and 
married Miss Ellen L. Newton. For many 
years he was one of the leading business 
men of his native town, and occupied a very 
prominent position in social, business and 
political affairs. For one or more terms he 
ser\ed as a member of the legislature, 
with credit to himself and constituents. 
Fraternall}' he was a Mason. His death 
occurred in 1878, his wife passing away two 
years previously. They were the parents 
of five children as follows: Charles Barton, 
a business man of Hinsdale, New Hamp- 
shire; H. H., of this review; George C, of 
Oregon, Illinois, who is interested in the 
creamery business with our subject. 

The subject of this sketch spent his boy- 
hood and youth in his nati\'e town, and in 
the high school of Hinsdale, New Hamp- 
shire, finished his education. He came to 
De Kalb county in 1880, and was employed 
by H. B. Gurley, who operated a creamery 
on his farm near De Kalb, Illinois. While 
with Mr. Gurlev he rerei\ed a thorough and 



The bio( graphical recc 



practical knowledge of the creamery busi- 
ness, and in 1884 he formed a partnership 
with his emplo}-er, and under the firm name 
of Gurley & Hopkins, they purchased a 
creamery at Hinckley, which had been in 
operation some years, but was then run 
down and doing no business. Mr. Hopkins 
assumed the business management of the 
Hinckley concern, and at once commenced 
active operations. In due time the old ma- 
chinery was replaced with new, and the 
plant is now better supplied with improved 
machinery than any other in this section of 
the state. From time to time the firm 
added other plants, until they have now 
eight creameries in Lee, De Kalb and Ogle 
counties. They are all first class plants, 
and turn out daily about three thousand 
three hundred pounds of first class butter. 
Our subject has full charge of the business, 
and to him is due the great success of these 
creameries. 

Mr. Hopkins was married at De Kalb, 
Illinois, March 14, r88,:;, to Miss Frances 
E. Geiser, a native of Fonda, New York, 
but who was reared and educated iil De 
Kalb. 

Politically Mr. Hopkins is a stanch Re- 
publican, and has been quite acti\'e in local 
politics, often serving as a delegate to the 
various comentions of his part}'. In the 
state convention of 1898, with others, he 
represented De Kalb county as a delegate. 
F"or some tweh'e years he served as a mem- 
ber of the town council, being one of its 
most active and influential men. He was 
interested in and helped organi2e the fire 
department, and has since been at the head 
of that organization. Fraternally he is a 
Masnn, holding membership in the blue 
lodge at Hinckley, the chapter at Sandwich 
and the commandery at .Aurora. In the 



work of the lodge he has taken special inter- 
est, and has served as worshipful master of 
the lodge at Hinckley. While a resident of 
the county but eighteen years, he has an 
extensive acquaintance in every part as well 
as in the surrounding counties. As a busi- 
ness man he is thoroughly enterprising, and 
is alive to e\erv matter that will add to the 
growth and prosperity of his adopted county 
and state. 



T C DrX'CAN, M. I)..isoneof De Kalb's 
*J prominent physicians and surgeons, be- 
ing a thorough expert, both in the medical 
and surgical branches of his profession. His 
office is on Fourth street, where he has in 
his service the latest and most improved 
medical and surgical appliances. He was 
born in ^^'aukesha county, Wisconsin, March 
3, 1851, and is the son of Thomas and Eli2a 
(Cation) Duncan, both of whom were natives 
of Scotland, ami who immigrated to this 
country in 1842, locating in New York, where 
they remained five ^ears In 1847 they re- 
moved to \\'isconsin, where they remained 
twenty-three years, going from thence to 
Iowa, where the succeeding ten years was 
spent. In 1880 they removed to Mendota, 
Illinois, where the remainder of their lives 
was spent. Eliza Duncan die 1 in Decem- 
ber, 1890, in her se\-ent3'-third year, and 
Thomas Duncan, December 18, 1895, at the 
age of eighty-one years. 

The famil\- of Thomas and Eliza Duncan 
consisted of nine children, seven sons and 
two daughters. P'ive of these sons are 
practicing physicians at the present time. 
Thomas C. Duncan, M. D., of Chicago, is 
also an author of some note, his volume on 
treatment of infants and children being a 
standard work, which should not r)iily be in 



156 



THE BIOGKAPHICAL RECORD. 



every physician's library, but in e\ery par- 
ent's home. David Duncan. M. D.. is also 
a resident of Chicago. George B. Duncan, 
M D. , resides in Kevvanee, Illinois, while J. 
C. Duncan, iM. D., is the subject of this 
sketch. Frank is an occulist and ranks 
high in his profession in Des Moines, Iowa. 
John is a farmer, residing in Me.xico, Mis- 
souri. William, a deceased son, gave his 
life in defense of his country during the 
siege of Vicksburg. 

The subject of this sketch received his 
primary education in Waukesha county, 
Wisconsin, after which he entered Milton 
College, Wisconsin, from which he was 
graduated in 1869. He then went to Iowa 
and engaged in agricultural pursuits, remain- 
ing there until 1S77, when he went to Chi- 
cago, and attended a course of medical lec- 
tures, but did not then graduate. Returning 
to Iowa, he studied and practiced with his 
brother, even then a proniinent physician, 
until 1882, when he again went to Chicago 
and became associated with his two brothers 
in study and practice. In 1887 he again 
attended medical college, and was graduated 
from the Chicago Homeopathic College. In 
March of the same year he removed to La 
Moile, Illinois, where his real active life be- 
gan, and where success attetided all his 
efforts. In 1892 he took up the studv of 
the eye and ear, making himself familiar 
with all the diseases of those organs. He 
is an e.xpert at testing the eye and fitting 
glasses to suit all the conditions of that del- 
icate member. 

On the 18th of May, 1875, Dr. Duncan 
was united in marriage with Miss Anna 
English, a native of Mitchell county, Iowa, 
born in 1855, and a daughter of Samuel 
English, one of the early settlers of that 
county. Mrs. Duncan died Mav r, 1877, 



leaving one son. Clifford J. , born September 
10, 1876. On the 8th of April. 1880, the 
Doctor was joined by niarriagi with Miss 
Nettie .M. Patchen, a daughter of Orlando 
and Cassie Patchen, of Wisconsin. By 
this union three boj'S were born: Howard 
W., December 11, 1881; D. Edgar, De- 
cember 3. 1885; and Thomas Roy, Novem- 
ber 22. 1889. 

Dr. Duncan remained in La Moile, Illi- 
n(jis, until October 15, 1896, when he re- 
moved to De Kalb, where he now resides, 
and where he enjoys the full confidence of 
De Kalb's best citizens. As a physician he 
has been verv successful. 



CAPTAIN HENRY C. WHITTEMORE, 
one of the representati\'e and honored 
citizens of De Kalb county, who for many 
years has been one of the leading merchants 
of Sycamore, was born at Auburn, New 
York, October 31, 1841, and is the son of 
Lorenzo and Hannah (Kelsey ) W'hittemore. 
His father was born in Leicester, Massa- 
chusetts, March 11, 1807, and was the son 
of Samuel Whittemore, who was a native of 
the same place, born September 15, 1769. 
Samuel Whittemore was a son of Lieuten- 
ant James Whittemore, who was first ser- 
geant of a company during the war of the 
Revolution, and who marched with his com- 
pany to Lexington, April 17, 1775, and 
was subsequently promoted to lieutenant. 
James was the son of John of Leicester, and 
a great-grandson of Thomas, who came to 
America from Hitchin, connt^- Hereford, 
England, in 1641, settling in Charlestown, 
Massachusetts. 

Samuel Whittemore, who was a farmer 
by occupation, moved from Massachusetts 
to New 'S'ork and resided for a time in Cav- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



uga and Allegany counties. He later 
moved to Sycamore, Illinois, but died at 
\^'estfield, New York, in iS66. while on a 
visit to that place. His wife, Catherine 
Ringer, died some tuent_\- years previously. 
Lorenzo Whittemore came west in 1848, 
and located in Sycamore, where his death 
occurred August 3 I, i8<S-. He was by occu- 
pation a carpenter, but also learned the 
shoemaking trade and was engaged in that 
line of business for a time. He was a 
natural mechanic. Politically he was a 
Republican, and religiousl}' a member of the 
Congregational church. He was a large, 
portly man, weighing two hundred and 
twenty-five pounds. At one time he was 
coroner of the county, serving a single term. 
His wife, Hannah Kelsey, was a native of 
Ulster county. New York, born December 
25, 1805, and died at Sycamore in March, 
1879. They were the parents of two chil- 
dren, Henry C. and Floyd K. The latter 
is now deputy state treasurer and resides at 
Springfield, Illinois. He was born October 
2, 1844, at Auburn, New York, came west 
with his parents and was educated in the 
schools of Sycamore. .After serving an ap- 
prenticeship in the office of the True Repub- 
lican, he entered the offices of the circuit 
clerk of De Kalb counts', and served from 
1861 to 1864. In 1865 he was made assist- 
ant state treasurer under Beverridge, and 
served with him two years, going out at the 
expiration of his term. He then entered 
the banking house of Jacob Bunn, at Spring- 
field, as bookkeeper and was shortly made 
teller and later casiiier, serving as such until 
the organization of the State National Bank 
at Springfield, when he became cishier of 
that institution, serving about twenty years. 
He then became cashier of the subtreasury 
at Chicago, under the administration of 



President Harrison. In 1895 he was niade 
assistant state treasurer, and has held that 
position up to the present time. In the 
summer of i S98 he was nominated on the 
Republican ticket for the office of state 
treasurer. He is regarded as one of the 
best financiers in Illinois. 

Henry C. Whittemore, our subject, was 
reared in Sycamore, where he received his 
education in the public schools. For a time 
he served as clt-rk in a mercantile establish- 
ment, and then entered the office of the cir- 
cuit clerk and was there engaged when the 
war broke out. He enlisted in September, 
1 86 1, and was mustered in in October of 
the same year, as a member of Battery G, 
Second Illinois Light Artillery, Captain C. 
J. Stolbrand commanding. He was in a 
camp of instruction until December, then 
went to Cairo, and from there followed the 
army down the Mississippi. He was ap- 
pointed ordnance officer at Cairo, and had 
charge of the ordnance depa'-tmeut of the 
Army of the Tennessee. He was with the 
fleet at Island No. 10, where he remained 
two weeks. He then went to Columbus, 
Kentucky, and was engaged in keepingopen 
the railroads there. At that place he served 
on the staff of. General Ouimby, and also 
General Davis. He was later transferred to 
the Army of the Cumberland, and was judge 
advocate for several months. He was then 
with his battery in front of Fort Donelson. 
Later he was placed on the staff of General 
Rousseau and ser\ed with him until the 
close of the war. 

Cap ain Whifemore was mustered out 
of service July 29, 1865 and wa> soon aft- 
erwards sent south in the employ of the 
postal department, in reorganizing the pos- 
tal service in the southern states. He con- 
tinued in that service until 1867, when he 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



returned home and hit' r engaged ni the 
tanning business in which he continued fui 
a time. In 1873 he commenced in the 
hardware business under the hrm name of 
Harkness cS: Winttemore, which partner- 
ship c-ntmued until the iornu r's deatli, 
when Mr. Chaud.erhiin and Mr. A. W. 
Brower purchased tlie interest of tlie Hark- 
ness heirs, nnd the hrm became W'hitte- 
more. Chambeikiin & Co. Later Mr. 
Chamberlain retired and the lirin became 
^^■hittemore & Brower. They carry a large 
line of general hardware, agricultural im- 
plements, carriages and wagons, and ha\e 
built up a large trade. 

Captain \\'hittemi>re was united in mar- 
riage March 17, 1S64, to Miss Amelia Mar- 
tin, a daughter of Harrj' and Jane fSlack) 
Martin, both nf whom were natives of \'er- 
mont. She was born in Sycamore, to 
which place her parents removed some 
years previous!)'. By this union there are 
five children; Charles F. , born in Jul}-, 1865, 
died at the age of six years. Mary is yet 
under the parental roof. Harry M., who 
is engaged in business with his father, mar- 
ried Miss Gertrude Chapell, by whom he 
has one child, Helen. Cora married Dr. 
George \\". Xesbitt, of Sycamore. Floyd 
graduated from the high school at Syca- 
more, then entered the Illinois University, 
from which he was also graduated. He is 
now employed in the office of the state 
treasurer at Springfield. 

. Mrs. Whittemore is a member of the 
Congregational church in which she takes 
an active part. Politically the Captain is 
a Republican, with which party he has 
been associated since attaining his major- 
ity. By his party he has been honored 
with a number of official positions, includ- 
ing alderman of his ward and member of 



the county board of supervisors. He was 
first elected a member of the board in 1883, 
and has been re-elected at each succeeding 
election, and is yet serving as a member, 
gising eminent safisfaction. He v\'as a 
member of the thirty-fourth i;eneral as- 
sembly at the time General Logan was 
electe(J United States senator, after a hard 
and gallant tight. As a member of that 
bod\- Captain \\'hittemore did good serv- 
ice. He is now one of the trustees of the 
State Home for Juvenile Offenders at Ge- 
neva. He has always taken an active in- 
terest in political affairs, and is usually a 
delegate in the \arious conventions of his 
party, county, congressional and slate. 

Fraternall\- Captain Whittemore is a 
Mason, and is a member of the blue lodge, 
chapter and commandery at Sycamore. 
He is also a inember of Potter Post, No. 
12, G. .\. R. , at Sycamore, of which he is 
past commander. He is a man of social 
character and generous mstiuct. As a citi- 
zen he is public-spirited and is active in all 
enterprises for the benefit of the people. 
He is greatly esteeiried by all who know 
him. 



JOHN POWERS, who resides on section 
28, .Aftoii township, is a representative 
farmer and well known throughout the 
county. He is a native of county Water- 
ford, Ireland, born December 20, 1837, 
and is the son of John and Catherine (Quin- 
lan) Powers, who were also natives of Ire- 
land and the parents of five children, Ed- 
ward, Patrick, John, Mary and Ann. 

In 1854, when but seventeen years of 
age, our subject came to America, and 
worked on a farm in De Kalb county by the 
month for several years in order that he 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



might get a start in the world. Pre\ious 
to leaving his native land he attended a 
private school, and received a limited edu- 
cation. Since connng to the United States, 
by reading and obser\'ation, he has become 
a well-informed man. In 1864 he made 
his first purchase of land, buying two hun- 
dred acres at sixteen dollars per acre. 
Later he purchased eighty acres more, gi\-- 
ing him a fine farm of two hundred and 
eighty acres of good land, which, with the 
improvements, is now wortli about seventy- 
iive dollars per acre. 

Mr. Powers was united in marriage with 
Miss Anna Hannagan, a native of Ireland 
and of Irish descent. Eleven children have 
been born to this union, of whom three are 
deceased. The living are Anna, John, 
Stephen, William, Nora, Maggie, Fred and 
Ed. Mr. Powers and his family are all 
members of the Catholic church, and in 
politics he is a Democrat. He has always 
been interested in educational affairs, and 
for fully twenty years has served as a mem- 
ber of the school board. A farmer who 
thoroughly understands his business, he has 
met with success in his vocation. As a cit- 
izen he is greatl}' esteemed in the commu- 
nity, which has been his home for more 
than a third of a centurv- 



JOHN G. DAVY, foreman in Bradt & 
Shipman's glove factory, De Kalb, Illi- 
nois, is a native of the city, born March 7, 
1859, ^n<^ is the son of Charles and Mary 
Ann (Whitler) Davy, both natives of Eng- 
land, who emigrated to this country in 1S55, 
locating in De Kalb, Illinois, where the 
father engaged in the butcher business in 
which he proved very successful. In i860, 
during the campaign, he killed and roasted 



an o.\, in honor of Lincoln's \isit to the city. 
He was a strict business man, true to those 
principles which guide and govern success- 
ful men.' He died June 29, 1862, at the 
age of thirt}' two years, his widow and two 
sons sur\"iving. 

John G. Davy was reared and educated 
in De Kalb, and after receiving his educa- 
tion in the schools of the city, he was em- 
ployed by George Gurler in the grocery 
trade, for whom he worked three and a half 
years. At the age of twent}--two, he went 
to work for I. A. Robinson, in the glove 
factor)', then located in the basement of the 
Glidden House. He remained there two 
years, and at the expiration of his first year 
Mr. Robinson made him foreman of the 
shop. In 18S3 he bought the De Kalb 
Mitten Compan}', which he successfully con- 
ducted on his own account, increasing the 
business to such an extent that Mott & Wol- 
cott were induced to buy him out in 1891. 
In the following year Mott & Wolcdtt sold 
out to Bradt & Shipman, who put Mr. Davy 
in charge of the entire plant. 

On the 29th of March, 1882. Mr. Davy 
was united in marriage with Miss Laura B. 
Stevens, born at Sterling. New York, August 
5, 1865, and a daughter of Phillip and Car- 
oline M. Stevens. Her father died March 
25, 1880. and her mother moved with the 
family to De Kalb county, Illinois, arriving 
here May 18, 1880. To Mr. and Mrs. Davy 
five children have been born: Althea Ruth, 
born October i i, 1S83; Percival E., Febru- 
ary 10, 1886; Benjamin L. , December i, 
1888; Reuben R., June i, 1891; and Okley 
B., October 12, 1893. 

Mr. Davy is one of De Kalb's prominent 
young men, of good business tact and enter- 
prise. He has been interested in the man- 
ufacture of cigars lur a number of )ears, 



I Go 



THE BIOGKAPllICAL RECORD. 



and has brought upon the niarkel several 
novel and choice brands, one known as the 
"Fraternit." He has also carried on suc- 
cessfully the lunch-room known 'as " The 
Famous Coffee House,' situated on Sixth 
street, near the depot. li\ his townsmen 
he has been chosen as a tit man to repre- 
sent their interests in ottice, ami is now 
serving; his second term as alderman of the 
second ward. He is a charter member of 
the Mndern W.H.dmcn ni America, organ- 
ized in 18.S4, and is also a member of the 
Knights of Pythias, Kmghts of the Macca- 
bees, Royal NeiK'libors and Home Forum, 
in all of which he is a leading spirit. 



AMUS W. TOWNSENI^, deceased, was 
for man\- years one of the leading busi- 
ness men of He Kalb count}', a man well 
known throughout its length and breadth, 
one who by his ow n success was enabled to 
assist others in securing a foothold in life. 
His life was an exemplification of the fact 
that there are no rules for building charac- 
ters and none for achieving success. The 
man who can rise from the ranks to a posi- 
tion of eminence is he who can see and util- 
ize the opportunities that surround his path. 
The essential conditions of human life are 
ever the same; the surroutidings of indi\'id- 
uals differ but slightly. When one man 
passes another uu the highway of life, it is 
because he has the power to use adx'antages 
which probably encompass the whole human 
race. 

Amos W. Townsend was born in the 
town of N'eversink, Sullivan county, New 
York, September 23, 1832. His ancestry 
is traced back to his great-grandfather, 
Charles Townsend, who lived for some years 
i,n Sussex county, New York, but spent the 



latter \'ears of his life in Sullixan county, in 
the same state, dying when quite an old 
man. His wife was a Miss Hall. During 
the Revolutionary war, he served in the 
inilitKi of New York, assisting the struggle 
tor independence. His son. |oshua Town- 
send, was born in Deckertown, Sussex coun- 
ty. New York, July 14, 17.S7. He married 
Phebe Porter, a native of New Haven coun- 
ty, Connecticut, b(jrn P'ebruary 17, 1787. 
They came west in 1S40, locating in May held 
township, De Kalb county. Illinois, where the 
former died April 17, i80i,and the latter 
April 28, 1867. Their son, Stephen 'Pown- 
send, the father of our subject, was born in 
Sullivan county. New York, in the town of 
N'eversink, June 30, 1807. He there married 
Mi.ssAnn Denman. Herfatlier, \\'illiain Den- 
man, was born in Ditchling, Sussex county, 
England, November 12, 1763. He married 
.\nn l^oorman, born m Sheddom, Kent coun- 
ty, P^ngland, .August 9, 1772. They later 
emigrated to the United States, and settled 
in the town of N'eversink, Sullivan coimty. 
New York, where his death occurred De- 
cember 10, 1858, his wife preceding him, 
having died June 5, 1842. In I 840, Stephen 
Townsend came with his tamily to Maytield 
township, De Kalb county, Illinois, where 
he purchased a farm and where the re- 
mainder of his life was passed. He died 
some _\ ears ago ami his wife makes her home 
in Sycamore and is now eighty-nine years 
old. 

The subject of this sketch was but eight 
years of age when he came with the family 
to De Kalb county. They came to this 
country preceded by an uncle of our sub- 
ject, who came here in 1S37. There were 
three generations in the party, and all lo- 
cated in Ma\field township. The\' drove 
through from the east with teams, and were 




AMOS W. TOWNSEND. 




MRS. A. W. TOWNSEND, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



several weeks in making the journey. Pre- 
vious to their leaving Sulli\an county, New 
York, our subject there attended school for 
a year or two, and after his coming to De 
Kalb comity he attended the district school 
for a time, and completed his education in 
the Wheaton academy now Wheaton Col- 
lege. Before attaining his majority, he be- 
gan farming on his grandfather's farm, where 
he remained until the time of his marriage. 

Mr. Townsend was married in Sycamore, 
October 15, 1857, to Miss Eleanor Pierce, 
a native of Sullivan county, New York, and 
a daughter of Daniel and Phebe J. (Brund- 
age) Pierce, of whom mention is made else- 
where in this work. By this union five 
children have been born. Frederick B. is 
the present mayor of Sycamore and man- 
ager of the bank of Daniel Pierce & Com- 
pany. A more extended notice of him 
appears on another page of this work. 
Jennie married Charles A. Webster, and 
they have three children, Marian, Fred- 
erick C. and Pierce. They reside in Gales- 
burg, Illinois. Anna married Frank E. 
Claycomb, of Monmouth, Illinois, by whom 
she had five children, Eleanor, Amos T., 
Alta Louise, George F. and Edward Den- 
man. She is now deceased, dying April 8, 
1892. Georgia married Captain John E. 
Yates, and their four children are Doroth}', 
Margaret, Marjorie and Oscar T. The 
family now reside in Boise City, Idaho. 
Mary, the youngest born, yet remains with 
her mother. 

Immediately after his marriage, Mr. 
Townsend bought a farm a few miles north 
of Malta, where he lived for nineteen years, 
and where he successfully followed agricult- 
ural pursuits. In the fall of 1876, on ac- 
count of the death of the mother of Mrs. 
Townsend, they removed to a farm one 



mile west of S}camore, to make a home for 
Mrs. Townsend's father. On removal to 
this farm, in addition to giving his personal 
attention to its management, Mr. Town- 
send soon became interested in the banking 
house of Daniel Pierce & Company, as the 
junior member of the firm. He was a 
thorough business man, methodical in all 
his ways, and success crowned his efforts. 
In politics he was a stanch Republican, and 
while always taking an active interest in 
political affairs, and while gi\'!ng unswerving 
allegiance to his party, he never asked nor 
would accept office, save that of supervisor 
of his township, an office which was forced 
upon him by his friends and neighbors, be- 
cause of his well-known ability and strict 
integrity of character. His death occurred 
August 25, 18S7, and his remains were laid 
to rest in the beautiful cemetery at Syca- 
more. By his death the wife lost an affec- 
tionate husband, and the children a kind 
and loving father, and the community one 
of its best known citizens, a man that was 
ever ready to do his part in promoting the 
business and material welfare of his adopted 
county and state. Mrs. Townsend now re- 
sides in a beautiful residence on Scmonauk 
street. Sycamore, Illinois, and her home is 
the abode of hospitality and the center of a 
refined circle of friends and acquaintances, 
who esteemed her for her many e.xcellent 
traits of character. 



WILLIAM H. ROBINSON, for many 
years a successful farmer in Syca- 
more township, and later a dealer in agri- 
cultural implements in the city of Syca- 
more, but who is now living a retired life, 
was born January 9, 1835. His father, 
John Robinson, was born in Lancashire, 



1 66 



THE BIOGKAPHKAL RECORD 



England, Xo\ember 14, 1804, and came to 
America, when but eighteen years old, sail- 
ing from Liverpool and landing in Canada, 
where he resided for a time, and later 
moved to New York, but returned to Can- 
ada. In the fall 01 1836 he came to Illi- 
nois and selected a location in Plato town- 
ship, Kane count_v, and then sent for his 
family, consisting then of a wife, son and 
daughter. They came in the spring of 
1837, and he there made his home until his 
death, with the exception of about three 
years spent in California. In 1S52 he went 
with a drove of cattle across the plains to 
California, riding all the way on horseback, 
and was from April to November in making 
the journey. He reached the mountains 
too late to get the cattle through, and 
therefore left them with his partners in Car- 
son \'alley until the next spring. He met 
only with moderate success in nn'ning oper- 
ations. After the expiration of three 3'ears 
he returned to Plato township, Kane coun- 
ty, Illinois, and resumed farming. Success 
attended him as an agriculturist, and he ac- 
quired two hundred and fifty acres of very 
valuable land. \\'hile residing in Canada he 
married Sarah Hole, a native of Somerset- 
shire, England, born in 1800, and who 
came to America m 1818. Her father, 
Robert Hole, who married Rachel Hans- 
ford in England, settled first in Canada, and 
later came to the United States, settling 
near St. Charles, Kane county, Illinois, 
where he engaged in farming, but later re- 
turned to Canada, where he died at the age 
of ninety-seven years. To John and Sarah 
Robinson four children were born. Mary 
Ann married Gilbert Sawin, and both are 
now deceased. William H. is the subject 
of this sketch. Robert lives in Elgin. 
Rachel died in yount womanhood. 



William H. Robinson, our subject, was 
born in Bradford, Canada, and was brought 
by his parents to Plato township, Kane coun- 
ty, Illinois. On the farm of his father he 
grew to manhood and assisted in its culti- 
vation from the time he was able to hold 
the plow. His education was limited to 
the common schools of Plato township, but 
by reading and observation he has since 
become well informed. When his father 
went to California he left him, a lad of sev- 
enteen years, in charge of the home farm, 
with all its responsibilites. He remained 
under the parental roof until the age of 
twenty-four years, when he was united in 
marriage, August i, 1858, with Miss Sabron 
C. Seward, born at Romulus, Seneca coun- 
ty. New York, October 18, 1837, but who 
at the age of two years was taken by her 
parents to Broome county. New York. In 
1851 the family moved west and settled in 
North Plato, Kane county, Illinois. Her 
father, Chandley Lambert Seward, was 
born in Courtwright, Delaware county. New 
York, in 1807. In Broome county, the 
same state, he married Harriet Lee, No- 
vember 28, 1830. She was born in Che- 
nango county. New York, April 25, 1813, 
and is the daughter of Nathaniel and Sarah 
(French) Lee, who moved from Connecti- 
cut to New York, at a very early day. Na- 
thaniel Lee was a fine cabinet maker, and 
made a set of furniture for his daughter 
Harriet when she began housekeeping as 
the wife of Mr. Seward. Chandley L. and 
Harriet Seward were the parents of four 
children, of whom Mrs. Robinson is third 
in order of birth. The others were Mary 
Jane Holmes, who lives in Kaneville, Illi- 
nois; Nathaniel Edrick, living' in Boone 
county, Illinois; and William \\'allace, who 
lives in Newago count)', Michigan. Chand- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ley L. Seward was one of the first to vol- 
unteer from Kane count}- in the Civil war, 
enlisting for three years. His son, Nathan- 
iel Edrick, served four years in that war, 
enlisting in Kansas. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, 
William Robinson, lived and died in Lan- 
cashire, England, where he was the owner 
of forty acres of land which is now in the 
heart of the city of Lanshire. The grand- 
father of Mrs. Robinson, David Seward, a 
native of New York, married Susan Smith 
and moved to Michigan, where he died 
some years ago. He was a soldier in the 
war of 1812. 

To our subject and wife four children 
have been born, (ii George E., born in 
Plato township, Kane county, Illinois, May 
27, 1859, married Mmerva Love, who was 
a successful school teacher, and they have 
six children, Carrie, Arthur, Glenn, Leon 
D. and Fern S. and an infant. For some 
years he was engaged in the farming imple- 
ment business with his father, but now con- 
tinuing the same business in partnership 
with his brother-in-law, L. D. Lc\'e. 
George E. is a graduate of a business col- 
lege in Jacksonville, Illinois. (2 ) Cora B. 
married Fred S. Rich, and the}- have one 
son, Ernest Paul. Their home is in New- 
ton, Iowa, where he is engaged in the 
manufacture of self-feeders for threshing 
machines. Cora, attended Jennings Semi- 
nary at Aurora and later taught school for 
several terms. (3J Elsie A. is a graduate 
of the Sycamore public schools. She studied 
stenography and journalisni, and was em- 
ployed during the World's Fair at Chicago, 
by the Press Bureau, to gather news at the 
White City. At the close of the fair she 
accepted a position with the same bureau 
in New York Citv. She is a svriter on 



special topics for the New York Herald, 
New York World and the Chicago Times- 
Herald. As a story writer, and also a 
writer of poetry, she has contributed to 
such magazines as Lippincott's, Overland 
and others. She is a fluent writer, spe- 
cially strong in expressive adjectives, with a 
good conception of local color. She is now 
a stenographer in the office of a railroad 
official in Butte, Montana, a position which 
does not interfere with her literary work. 
(4) Edith died in infancy. 

Immediately after his marriage, Mr. 
Robinson was deeded forty acres on sec- 
tion 8, a part of his father's farm, and later 
he bought eighty acres in an adjoining sec- 
tion, and a timber tract in Hampshire 
township. In 1865, he sold that farm and 
came to De Kalb county and purchased one 
hundred and five acres in sections 4 and 9, 
Sycamore township, and there engaged in 
farming until 1874, when he moved to the 
city of Sycamore, opened an agricultural 
implement store and engaged in the busi- 
ness until January i, 1897, when he sold 
his interest to his son and son-in-law, who 
for some time had been in partnership with 
him. 

In politics Mr. Robinson is a Republican. 
The family are regular attendants of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 



ORLANDO HARPER is a retired farm- 
er living in the village of Kingston. 
He was born in what is now Erie county, 
Ohio, May 27, 1830, and is the son of 
Joseph and Susan (Williams) Harper, the 
former a native of New York and the latter 
of Vermont. Prior to the birth of our sub- 
•ject, they had resided in Ohio for some 
time, where the father engaged m agricult- 



i6S 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ural pursuits. In 1839 the\' removed to 
Boone county, Illinois, where they remained 
about one year, and then moved to Frank- 
lin township, De Kalb county, and in 1841 
located in Kingston township, where the 
father made a claim to a farm of one hun- 
dred and si.xty acres, which he improved 
and upon which they lived a prosperous and 
respected people. Afterwards he purchased 
it from the government. Joseph Harper 
died in 1S48, at the age of fifty- four years, 
and his wife in 1857, at the age of sixty 
years. Their family numbered nine chil- 
dren, four of whom are now living, Mrs. 
Laura W. Buck, George, Col. J. W. and 
Orlando. 

The subject of this sketch was fifth in 
order of birth, and was reared and educated 
mostly in Kinjiston township, being nine 
J ears of age when his parents removed to 
Illinois. He remained upon the home farm 
and assisted in iis culiivat'on until after lie 
attained h'S m.ijority, in tlie meantiirje at- 
tend nj; the common s'-hools, as the oppor- 
tunity was aff irded him. On the 21st of 
S pt m'jer, 1853, he was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Sallie Cameron, a native of 
Indiana, born July 21, 1837, and a daughter 
of William and Sallie Cameron, who came 
to De Kalb county in .1843. locating in 
Kingston township, on section 19, where 
her father purchased a farm of one hundred 
and twenty acres. He was born in Ken- 
tuck}- in 1793. and died in 1872, at the age 
of seventy-nine years. His wife was born 
in Virginia in 1795, and died in 1868, at the 
age of seventy-three years. They were 
well-to-do people, and highly respected for 
the true worth. 

Immediately after his marriage Mr. 
Harper rented a farm, which he cultivated 
for two years. He had >outh, strength, 



ambition and pluck on his side, and saw the 
necessity of putting his entire energies on a 
place of his own. He therefore purchased 
a small farm of eighty acres m section 31, 
Kingston township, upon which he built 
and where he resided for six years. In 
1865 he .sold that farm to H. P. Grout, and 
purchased another farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres of partially improved land, and 
which in after years under his skillful hands 
and governing mind became a model farm. 
He was always practical and kept abreast 
of the times. In 1881, on account of fail- 
ing health, he retired to Kingston, renting 
his farm. There with his wife he lives a 
peaceful and contented life. He has been 
honored with the office of trustee of his 
town, an office which he conscientiously 
tilled. 



CHARLES S. HOLMES, who is living 
retired in the village of Shabbona, 
came to De Kalb county, in 1848. He is 
a native of New York, born in Madison 
county, July 14, 1837. He is the son of 
Richard Holmes, a native of Vermont, born 
in 1 8 10, and the grandson of Seth Holmes, 
a native of one of the New Enland states. 
The family are of English descent, and 
were early sttlers of New England. Seth Hol- 
mes moved from Vermont to New York, and 
became one of the pioneers of Madison 
county. Richard Holmes, his son, there 
grew to manhood and married Lucretia 
Smith, a native of New York, born near the 
Hudson river. For a number of years, he 
engaged in merchandising at Albany, New 
York, and in 1848 came to De Kalb county, 
Illinois, and purchased a tract of land in 
Paw Paw township, owing some five or six 
hundred acres. NVitil his sous he com- 



'HI 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



r69 



menced the development of the place, and 
later sold a portion, leaving the home farm 
to consist of two hundred and forty acres, 
on which he erected good substantial build- 
ings, and spent some years there. His last 
days were spen, at the home of his sons, in 
the village of Shabbona. He died in March, 
1895, at the age of eighty-five years. His 
wife passed away in April, 1889, at the age 
of seventy-nine years. Previous to his 
moving to Shabbona, he resided some 
twenty years at Leland. By his fellow 
citizens he was honored with various town- 
ship offices, including road commissioner 
and supervisor. Richard and Lucretia 
Holmes were the parents of three sons. J. 
L. is a retired farmer, residing in Paw Paw 
township, near Rollo. Charles S. is the 
subject of this review. George R. is a 
business man of De Kalb. 

Charles S. Holmes came to De Kalb 
county, with his parents, when a lad of 
eleven years, and was educated in the com- 
mon schools and in the seminary at Paw 
Paw. He later took a commercial 
course at L. W. Burnham's Commercial 
College at Rockford, Illinois. He then 
engaged in merchandising at Ross' G.ove, 
two years, but not liking the business, he 
sold out and returned to the farm. Purchas- 
ing the interest of the other heirs, he 
succeeded to the old homestead, to which he 
later added one hundred and twenty acres, 
making him a fine and very productive farm 
of three hundred and sixty acres. In addi- 
tion to general farming, he gave some atten- 
tion to graded stock, and had some fine 
driving horses, from which he sold two 
teams one day, for nine hundred and fifty 
dollars. In his farming operations he was 
quite successful, but in 1883 he rented the 
farm, moved to Shabbona, purchased an 



acre of ground, built a residence and has 
since lived retired. 

Mr. Holmes was married in State Cen- 
ter, Iowa, December 11, 1S73, to Miss Ella 
Sherwood, who was born, reared and edu- 
cated in Shabbona, De Kalb count}', Illinois, 
and who commenctd teaching in the public 
schools when but si.xteen years of age, and 
was a successful teacher in De Kalb county 
for five years. She is a daughter of Solo- 
man and Martha Sherwood, natives of Ver- 
mont and \^^est Virginia respectively. Mr. 
Sherwood came with his family to De Kalb 
county, March i, 1S52, and settled on a 
farm near the village of Shabbona. He 
met his death by accident in 185S. His 
wife sur\-ived him and reared the family 
of eight children that grew to maturity, 
six of whom are living at the present 
time. To Mr. and Mrs. Holmes three 
sons have been born. Charles S., Jr., who 
is a well educated young man, is now taking 
a course at the Metropolitan Business Col- 
lege, Chicago. Fred W. is a graduate of 
the Shabbona schools, and is also taking a 
course at the Metropolitan College, and has 
entered the Northwestern University of Den- 
tistry, of Chicago, Illinois. Clare Richard is a 
student of the Shabbona schools, and is resid- 
ing at hone. They lost one daughter, Grace 
Ella, who died at the age of fifteen months. 

Politically Mr. Holmes was originally 
identified with the Democratic party, giving 
his support to the "little giant," Stephen 
A. Douglas, in i860. Later he became a 
Republican, with which party he was iden- 
tified for some years, but on account of his 
stanch temperance principles he has of late 
voted the Prohibition ticket. He never de- 
sired nor asked for office, and while in the 
country never served in an official capacity, 
but since his removal to the village he has 



THE BIOGRAPHICAI. RECORD. 



served on the village board two terms, one 
year being president of the board. 

Mr. and Mrs. Holmes, together with 
their two youngest sons, are members of 
the Congregational church in Shabbona, in 
which both are active workers. Both were 
teachers in the Sunday school, where they 
have been instrumental in doing much good. 
File latter is still a teacher. For many 
vears Mrs. Holmes has had charge of a class 
of adults, made up mostly of the young men 
of the place. Her class book shows that 
she has had seventy different pupils, some 
who have been actively engaged in business. 
Her influence has always been for good. In 
the fifty \ears in ^vhich Mr. Holmes has 
been a resident of De Kalb county, he has 
done his share in making it rank among the 
best counties of the state. His teaching 
and his example has always been for good. 



C.APT.UX JOSEPH W. FOSTER, a 
resident of the village of Kingston, is 
a native of .\dams county, Ohio, born Jan- 
uary 17, 1S28, and is the son of Moses C. 
and Anna B. (Robb) Foster, the former a 
native of Adams county, Ohio, and the 
latter of Mercer county, Pennsylvania, both 
born about 180G. He lived until his eighty- 
fourth year, while his wife lived to see her 
seventy-fourth year. Moses C. Foster was 
the son of Nathaniel and Rebecca C. Fos- 
ter, the former a native of New Jersew who 
served si.x years in the Revolutionary army, 
and who finally settled in Ohio, where he 
died at an advanced age. Thomas Robb, 
the maternal grandfather of our subject, 
was born in Mercer county, Pennsylvania. 
He was the father of a pair of twins, John 
and Thomas, who fought under General 
Jackson in the war (jf 181 2. .A Nounger 



son, William, was sheriff for several terms 
of a county in Indiana, also a representative 
in the state legislature. All were men of 
great influence in political affairs in their 
respective places of abode. Thomas Robb 
came to De Kalb county in 1835, locating in 
Kingston township where he took up one 
hundred and sixty acres of prairie and tim- 
ber land in section 22. Politically he was 
a Democrat and a man of influence in his 
party. He served his township in various 
offices. He also assisted in the organiza- 
tion of De Kalb county. His death oc- 
curred in 1844 at the age of seventy years. 
James K. Polk, once president of the Unit- 
ed States, was a cousin of Thomas Robb. 

Moses C. Foster was a potter by trade, 
and an expert workman. He removed 
from Ohio to Indiana, and there resided six 
years, coming from that state to Illinois in 
1836, locating in Kingston township, De 
Kalb county, where he purchased a farm of 
eighty acres on section 26. After his re- 
moval to the latter place he confined him- 
self principally to agricultural pursuits. He 
was quite active in politics, and was well 
versed in the political issues of the day. 
Originally he was a strong Henry Clay 
Whig, but subsequently became a Republic- 
an, with which party he was identified un- 
til his death in 1890. By his fellow citizens 
he was honored with se\-eral of the princi- 
pal township offices. His wife died in 
1 868. Their family consisted of nine chil- 
dren, eight of whom grew to maturity and 
six of whom are now living. 

Joseph W. Foster, our subject, was but 
eight years of age when his parents came to 
Kingston township. He was there reared 
upon the home farm and after receiving his 
education in the common schools followed 
the vocation of a farmer until i8;2, when 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



he went to Belvidere, Boone county, Illi- 
nois, and there engaged in the mercantile 
business, in which he continued for se\en 
years. During his stay at Belvidere he be- 
came a member of a military company 
known as the Boone Rifles. In i S59 he re- 
moved to De Ivalb, where he was for a 
time engaged in the grain business. In 1861 
he assisted in organizing a compan\-, the 
services of which were offered to the gen- 
eral government and of which he was com- 
missioned first lieutenant. The compan\- 
was assigned to the Forty-second Illinois 
Volunteer, Infantry under Colonel D. Stuart, 
and became known as Company K. \\'ith 
his regiment he went to the front and par- 
ticipated in the battles of Farmington, Co- 
lumbia, Stone River, Chickamauga, and in 
thelatterengagement was severely wounded. 
September 20, 1863, and left for dead on 
the battlefield, and taken prisoner by the 
enemy. He was removed from one prison 
to another and was finally incarcerated in 
Libby prison, where he originated the 
scheme of tunneling the prison. The 
scheme was carried out and one hundred 
and nine men escaped, but it was discovered 
before his turn came. He was thus doomed 
to be a prisoner until the close of the war. 
He was mustered out of the service, as cap- 
tain, May 15, [865, after spending seven- 
teen months and eleven days in prison. 

On his return to civil life Captain Foster 
settled in Kingston township, where he 
turned his attention to farming until 1S92, 
when he removed to the village of Kingston 
where he now resides. On June 19, 1849, 
he was joined in wedlock with Miss Alidah 
Baringer, born at Sand Lake, Genesee coun- 
ty, New York, August 30, 183 1, arid a 
daughter of Martin and Mary Ann Baringer. 
By this union four children were born, three 



of whom are now living: John W,, Charles 
M. and Thomas P. The first two are farm- 
ers, while the latter is a skillful mechanic. 
Captain Foster is a popular man in his 
town and is thoroughly alive to all its inter- 
ests. As an appreciation of his willingness 
to serve well they have elected him assessor 
for fourteen years. He has also been pres- 
ident of the board of trustees for one term. 
Under President Hayes' administration he 
was appointed assistant United States mar- 
shal, and took the census of seven town- 
ships in De Ivalb county. His aniiy record 
is good — none better — and when found 
wounded on the battlefield of Chickamauga 
no man was nearer the enemy's lines. As 
a reward for his bravery and injuries re- 
ceived the government pays him a pension. 
He is a member of the Grand Army of the 
Republic and has been commander of the 
post at Kingston. He and his vv'ife are con- 
sistent members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church and he was superintendent of the 
Sunday school for four years at Charter Oak. 



ALFRED BRADBURY is a retired mer- 
chant residing in Waterman, Illinois. 
He is a native of England, born in the county 
of Middlesex, near London, September 27, 
1822, and is the son of Jacob and Mary 
fWetherly) Bradbury, both of whom were 
natives of Middlesex county, the former liv- 
ing to the remarkable age of ninety-two 
years, the latter d3ing when seventy-eight 
years old. They were the parents of five 
children: Charles, deceased; Alfred, our sub- 
ject; Frances, who married a Mr. Honn- 
densden, and is now a widow residing in 
London; Ambrose, deceased; and Mrs. Sarah 
Whitehead, residing in London. Mrs. Brad- 
bury, the mother of these children, was a 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



daughter of William Such, of London, a 
traveling man, who married Ann Blake, also 
a native of England. Mrs. Bradbury was 
also born in the city of London. 

The subject of this sketch grew to man- 
hood in his native county, and in his youth 
learned the carriage and wagon maker's 
trade, but later worked at railroad carriage 
building in the city of London, for about 
eight years, being in the employ of the Lon- 
don cN: Northwestern Railroad Company. 
He was married in London, July 15, 1847, 
to Elizabeth Such, a native of I^ondon, 
England. In 1855, with his family, became 
to the United States, taking passage on a 
sailing vessel and being five weeks on the 
Atlantic ocean. He arrived in New York 
May 22, and came directly west to De Kalb 
county, Illinois, u'here he joined his brother 
Charles and located in S(|uaw Grove town- 
ship in 1851. 

On his arrival in De ICalb county, Mr. 
Bradbury purchased a lot at Freeland Cor- 
ners, built a shop and went to work at 
wagon making and blacksmithing, and also 
doing genera! repair work and continued in 
that business for seven years. He then pur- 
chased a rmall grocery store at the corner and 
engaged in the grocery business at that place 
for several \ears. \\'hLn the railroad was 
built lie was one of the first to commence 
business in the village of Waterman, and 
the very first one to engage exclusively in 
the grocery business. For twenty years he 
was actively engaged in that business at 
Waterman, when he sold out to his son. and 
has since been li\'ing a retired life. Mr. 
Bradbury was appointed postmaster at Free- 
land, November 3, 1863, and ser\-ed there 
until his removal to Waterman. Shortly 
after removing to the latter place, he was 
again appointed postmaster and served until 



t-leveland was elected president in 1884, a 
period in all of twenty-three years. He has 
also served in other positions of trust and 
honor, serving as township treasurer some 
six or eight years, and as a member of the 
village board several years. Since becoming 
a naturalized citizen, he has been a stanch 
Republican, not only advocating the prin- 
ciples of the party, but voting the party 
ticket. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bradbury have four chil- 
dren. Charles, who is a traveling sales- 
man, makes his home in Hartford City. 
Indiana. Frances .\nn is the wife of .Au- 
gust A. Stryker, a farmer of DeKalb coun- 
ty. Harry is now postmaster of Waterman. 
Georgetta resides at home and assists her 
brother in the postof^ce. They lost three 
children — Ambrose, who died when about 
twelve years old; William, who died when 
five 3'ears old; and Emily, who died when 
twelve years old. Mr. and Mrs. Bradbury 
were reared in the Episcopal faith. They 
have in their possession a bible that has 
been in the family for over two hundred and 
forty years. It was published in London, 
in 1637. They celebrated their golden wed- 
ding, July 15, 1897, when their children and 
grandchildren came to their home, making 
their hearts glad by their presents and tok- 
ens of lo\-e and esteem. For forty-three 
years they have resided in De Kalb county, 
and are well known, especially in the cen- 
tral part, and those who know them best 
have for them the highest regard. 



GENERAL F. W. PARTRIDGE, one 
of De Kalb county's most distin- 
guished citizens, now residing in the city of 
Sycamore, comes of fighting stock. His 
great-grandfather, Captain Samuel Part- 




GEN. F. W. PARTRIDGE. 

Aged 63 Years. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ridge, served in the colonial wars, while 
his grandfather, Captain Isaac Partridge, 
was in the Revolutionary war, and his 
father. Captain Cyrus Partridge, in the war 
of i8iJ. A cousin, Captain Alden Par- 
tridge, was at one time snperintemlent at 
West Point, and later estal)lished a mili- 
tary school at Harrisburg, Penns3l\-ania, in 
which our subject was military instructor. 

Captain Cyrus Partridge, the father of 
our subject, was born in Norwich, \'er- 
mont, July ii, 17S6, and there spent his 
entire life, d\ing July 16, 1842. He was a 
very prominent man in his native city and 
county, and for almost fort}* years \vas en- 
gaged in the mercantile business, and for a 
like period was postmaster. In addition to 
his mercantile business, he owned large 
sheep farms and was e.xtensively engaged 
in farming. For fifteen or twenty years he 
served as a member of the legislature, and 
was high sheriff of the count}' lor several 
terms. He was seldom or never out of 
one or more official positions, and could 
ha\e had any office for the asking. A life- 
long member of the Congregational church, 
he was active in the work of that body. 
During the war of 1812, he served as a 
captain of a compan\', and was with Scott 
at the battle of Lundy's Lane. A self-ed- 
ucated man, he had an unusually good 
memory, keen perceptive faculties, and was 
an omniverous reader. 

Captain Cyrus Partridge was united in 
marriage December 10, 1806, with Miss 
Mary Loveland, a native of Norwich, Ver- 
mont, born November 3, 1786, and who 
died in La Salle county, Illinois, January 
24, 1866. She was the daughter of Joseph 
Lo\eland, a native of Glastonbury, Con- 
necticut, born April 14, 1747, and who 
died in Norwich, \'ermont, September 8, 



1813. At Colchester, Connecticut, No- 
vember 12, 1773, he married Mercy Bige- 
low, a daughter of David and Mercy (Lewis) 
Bigelow. In 1776 he moved from Weath- 
ersfield, Connecticut, to Hanover, New 
Hampshire, and during the Revolutionary 
war, ser\ed in Colonel Jonathan Chase's 
regiment, and was in the battle of Ticon- 
deroga. David Bigelow was the son of 
John Bigelow, Jr., whose father was John 
Bigelow, Sr. , the son of Thomas Bigelow, 
who was an immigrant to this country. 
The Lovelands were early settlers of this 
country. A widow Loveland, with her 
three sons, settled at Glastonbury and 
Weathersfield, Connecticut, and bought In- 
dian land on both sides of the river. One 
of these brothers, Elisha, was the ancestor 
of our subject. He married Lucy Sparks, 
and ser\ed four years in the Rexolutionary 
army. 

Frederick W. Partridge, of this sketch, 
was born on the old iiomestead in Norwich, 
\'ermont, August 19, 1824. After attend- 
ing the common schools he studied at the 
American Literary, Scientific and Military 
Academy at Norwich, Vermont. He then en- 
tered Dartmouth College at Hanover, New 
Hampshire, which was only a mile and a 
quarter across the ri\er from his place of 
residence, leaving at the close of the fresh- 
man year on account of the death of his 
father. In 1845, ^ few j'ears after his fa- 
ther's death, he went to Pennsylvania and 
took charge of the Harrisburg Military Col- 
lege, which was established by his distin- 
guished cousin. He proxed to be a pro- 
ficient teacher in militar}' as well as classi- 
cal branches. 

In January, 1847, Mr. Partridge enlisted 
in the United States army and was en- 
trusted with a secret mission to Mexico by 



1-6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



President James K. Polk, with instnictions 
to see how operations were beinj^ conducted 
at the front, reporting to the Se( retarj- of 
War. Bcinj:^ a secret miss on he could not 
have credentials, and when captured as a 
spy he could not divulge the object of his 
mission. He was imprisoned at S.ar Juan 
D'Ulloa, where his cousin, Henry S liur- 
ton, lieutenant of First Artillery, was in 
command. He was later a general in the 
Ci\il war and commanded at Fortress Mon- 
loe at thf time Jefferson Davis was a pris- 
oner there. Mr. Partridge was soon re- 
leased and returned to Washington, the 
object of his mission not accomplished. 

After the Mexican war Mr. Partridge 
came to Illinois and located on a farm in 
Kendall county, where he made his home 
some seven or eight )ears. At the age of 
sixteen he began the study of law in Albanw 
New York, with Chancellor Kent, and after- 
ward read in the office of Franklin Pierce, 
of Concord, New Hampshire, later presi- 
dent of the United States. On coming to 
Illinois he continued his studies and finished 
under the tutelage of Hon. Isaac N. Arnold, 
of Chicago. (3n admission to the bar he 
began practice in Sandwich, Illinois, to 
which cit\' he removed about 1857. He 
always took an active interest in politics 
and was originally a Democrat, but left that 
organization on the birth of the Republican 
party. During the famous debates of Doug- 
las and Lincoln he attended many of their 
meetings and once entertained both of them 
at his home at the same time. He told 
Douglas frankly that he could not support 
his latest principles, and stumped the north- 
ern part of the state for Lincoln. 

In 1849, while still a resident of Kendall 
county, he was in command of a companj- 
of militia. At the outbreak of the Civil war, 



he was commissioned by Governor Yates 
captain of Company E, Thirteenth Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry, to take rank as tliesen^ 
ior captain of the state of Illinois and 
served with distinction for tliree years. He 
was rapidly promoted, beii g commissioned 
as major of his regiment, in June, 1S61. 
In December, 1862, he was promoted lieu- 
tenant-colonel, and June 18, 1864, colonel, 
for gallant service at Lookout Mountain, 
and after the battle of Ringgold Gap was 
breveted brigadier-general for distinguished 
bravery at Missionary Ridge. At Chickasaw 
Rayon, Mississippi, he was wounded and 
again at Chattanooga, and also at Ringgold 
Gap, Georgia. With his regiment he was 
mustered out of service July 18, 1864. 

After his discharge. General Partridge 
resumed the practice of law at Sandwich, 
Illinois, and also for some years had an 
office at 52 Lake street, Chicago. He 
ser\ed as postmaster of Sandwich for sev- 
eral years and was occupying that official 
position when elected clerk of the circuit 
court of De Kalb county, at which time he 
removed to Sycamore, Illinois. On the ex- 
piration of his term of office, he was ap- 
pointed in the spring of 1869, by President 
I'. S. (irant, as United States consul gen- 
eral to Bangkok, Siam, serving eight years. 
During his incumbency, he traveled much, 
made copious notes and at retirement wrote 
a voluminous account of his travels, exper- 
iences and observations in Siam, the manu- 
script unfortunately being lost in the de- 
struction of his residence by tire. 

On one of his excursions he sa\ed the 
life of a young man, b_y shooting his mur- 
derous pursuers. It chanced to be the son 
of the King of Siam that he saved, and 
the Iving became his fast friend, sending 
him many presents and offering him gold 



TH1-: BIOGRAPHICAL RECORi: 



medals, etc., which owing to his official po- 
sition, had at that time to be refused, but 
when offered later, after his term of office 
had expired, were accepted and are treasured 
relics of his life in Asia. 

At one time King of Chiengmai, of one 
of the tribes of Siam, became hostile to 
Christians, killing native converts and send- 
ing the missionaries from the countr)-. 
General Partridge insisted of the King of 
Siam that the persecutions of his tributary 
prince should cease, under threat of the 
United States recognizing the hitter's in- 
dependence. A treaty was then signed, 
granting greater freedom than ever to 
Christian missionaries. The consul's firm 
stand and successful fight for religious free- 
dom gained for tlie United States more re- 
spect than had ever been known before in 
southern Asia. 

During his travelsGeneral Partridge \ isit- 
ed many places of unusual interest, but none 
greater than the famous temple, Nakon-Wat, 
one of the wonders of the world. On lay- 
ing down the cares of office in Jul)-, 1S7G, 
he returned home by way of Singajxjre and 
the Suez canal, traveled over liurope and 
reached home in October, very tired from 
travel and sightseeing. After a few years of 
private life, in 1882, the General was again 
called to official duties, being appointed 
special examiner of pensions, with head- 
quarters at Rushville, Indiana, and Tiffin, 
Ohio. He resigned in 1S89, since which 
time he has been living a retired life. 

In 1852, General Partridge was united 
in marriage with Miss Mary Pauline, a na- 
tive of East Aurora, Erie county, New 
York, b.y whom he had si.\ children, only 
one, Frederick P., now living. His daugh- 
ter, Blanche, who was a graduate of Elmira 
College, New York, died February 22, 189S. 



She was a great help to her father, attend- 
mg to his manuscript and correspondence. 
She had fine talents as a painter, many 
samples of her work being treasured by our 
subject. Mrs. Partridge died September 
20, 1882. 

General Partridge has his house filkd 
with curios and relics from sexeral conti- 
nents. His recollections of General Grant 
are very pleasant. While on his special 
mission during the Mexican war, at \'era 
Cruz, he first met the Gener.d, and there 
dined with hiin. Later he was instrumental 
in securing the commission for Grarjt at the 
beginning of the Civil war, when In's ap- 
pointment hung in the balance. Grant 
remembered his face and recalled meeting 
liim at \'era Cru/. When elected president, 
he did n...t forget his friend General Part- 



HON. HENRY M. ]50ARUM.\N, of 
Shabbona, Illinois, is one of the enter- 
prismg and re))resentati\e farmers and 
business men of I)e Kalb comity, owning 
and operating two well improved farms in 
Pasv Paw township. His settlement in 
Illinois dates from the fall of 1854 and in 
De Kalb county smce 1856. He is a native 
of the Green Mountain state, born in Rut- 
land county, December 12, 1831, and is the 
son of Captain Charles G. Boardman, a na- 
tive of the same county and state, and the 
grandson of Timothy Boardman, a nati\-e of 
Connecticut, who served on board a man- 
of war during the Revolution. By trade he 
was a ship carpenter. The Boardman 
famih' are of English descent, the first of 
the name coming to this country locating 
near Hartford, Connecticut. 

Captain Charles G. Boardman, the fa- 



TH] 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ther of our subject, j^ained his title b\- ser\ - 
ice in the militia of \'ermont. He was mar- 
riel in his native state, to Submit Watkins, 
a'Iso a na ive of Vermont, and a dani^hterof 
Colonel Watkins, a soldier of the R.volu- 
tionary war and one of the prominent men 
of Rutland, \'ermont. In his native state 
Captain Boardman spent his entire lile. He 
was a man highly honored and respected by 
all who knew him. 

Henry M. I)oardman, our subject, grew 
to manhood in X'ermont, and had good 
common-school advantages, supplemented 
by one term in a select sch(jol at Manches- 
ter, Vermont. After his education was 
completed, he was a teacher for two winter 
terms in his nati\e state. In the fall of 
1854 he came to Illinois, and stopped for a 
time at Joliet, where he joined a sister, 
then residing there. For some fifteen 
months he traveled through the northern 
part of Illinois, and in the spring of 1856 
came to De Kalb county, and purchased 
one hundred and eighty acres of partially 
improved land in Paw Paw township, upon 
which a small house had been erected. Re- 
turning to Vermont on the 6th of I-\'bruary, 
1856, in the city of Rutland, he married 
Miss Caroline Chatterton, a native of that 
state, reared and educated at Rutland, and 
the daughter of Deacon Waite Chatterton, 
who was of an old Vermont family. Im- 
mediately after marriage, he returned with 
his bride and they at once began their 
domestic life on the farm which was their 
home for many years after. He laterbought 
forty acres adjoining, and still later si.xty 
acres more, making a fine farm of two hun- 
dred and eighty acres. This farm he im- 
proved in a most substantial manner, mak- 
ing of it one of the best in the township. 
As his means increased, he purchased an- 



other farm in the same township, of one 
hundred and l!lt3-.fi)ur acres, which is also 
a well improved place. He now owns four 
hundred and thirty-four acres in Paw Paw 
township. After nearly thirty years of hard 
labor upon the farm, Mr. Boardman mo\'ed 
to the village of Shabbona in the spring of 
1885, and is now living a retired life. In 
addition to his farms in Paw Paw township, 
he owns two hundred acres of improved 
land in Pocahontas county, Iowa, near 
Pomero)' Station. 

Mrs. Boardman died in 1866, leaving 
one daughter, Frances, now the wife of 
George Hyde, of Paw Paw. F'or his sec- 
ond wife, November 18, 1868, Mr. Board- 
man married Miss Christiana Powers, a na- 
tive of La Salle county, Illinois, and a 
daughter of Norman H. Powers, who was 
an early settler of De Kalb county, where 
the early life of Mrs. Boardman was spent, 
but who was then residing in La Salle 
county. Mrs. Boardman, after attending 
the public schools of De Kalb and La Salle 
counties, co.npleted her education in the 
State Normal School at Normal, Illinois. 
By this union there are four children. Ellen 
is a young lady residing at home. After 
attending the schools of Shabbona. she 
spent two years at school in Ann Arbor, 
and is now one of the successful teachers 
of De Kalb county. Norman H. and Cath- 
erine S. are twins, and, after graduating at 
the High School of Shabbona, are now at- 
tending school at Ann Arbor, Michigan. 
Charles W., after completing the course at 
the High School at Shabbona, engaged in 
farm work, and is assisting in carrying on 
the home farm. 

Mr. and Mrs. Boardman and family are 
members of the Congregational church at 
Shabbona. Both parents are active workers 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



79 



in the church and Sunday school, Mr. 
Boardman being one of the trustees of the 
church and teacher of the IMble class, hav- 
ing had charge of the Bible class since 
his removal to the village. Politically he 
is a lifelong Republican, and in 1856 
cast his first presidential ballot for John 
C. Fremont, the first presidential nominee 
of the part}-. He has always taken an 
active part in local politics, and served 
as assessor of his township for eight years, 
and as supervisor for five years, serving 
as chairman of some of the irjost import- 
committees of the board. In 1882 he was 
elected a member of the legislature, and 
served one term. He was a member of the 
agricultural and other committees. He has 
been a steadfast friend of education and the 
public schools, and served some years as a 
member of the school board while in the 
country, and since his removal to the village 
has continued such service, being one year 
president of the board. He has alwa\s made 
an efficient officer in whatever position he 
has been asked to fill. 

Mr. Boardman commenced life in Illi- 
nois in very limited circumstances, but he 
was industrious and methodical, and, toil- 
ing early and late, he has secured a compe- 
tence that enables him to live in ease and 
retirement during the remainder of his days. 
His long residence in this section of the 
state has brought him in contact with man)' 
jieople, and wherexer and b\' whoever 
known he is held in the highest respect. 



REV. MAGNUS FRYK.MAN, pastor of 
the Swedish E\-angelical Lutheran 
Salem church. Sycamore, Illinois, was born 
in Sweden, province of W'ermland, parish of 
Sunne, October 3, 1844. He is the son of 



Lars and Chiistma :01son) Fr.\kuian, both 
natives of the same province and country. 
The family were old residents of that town. 
By occupation the father was a farmer and 
for years was in the public service, con- 
nected with the courts. Both he and his 
wife have been deceased for many \-ears. 
The Olson family were also agriculturalists, 
and all were members of the Lutheran 
church. Lars and Christina Frykman were 
the parents of nine children: Olof, Carrie, 
Mary, Christina, Cajsa, John, Nels, Mag- 
nus, and Catherine. The four oldest are 
deceased, while the living all reside in this 
country, except Cajsa. John and Xels are 
li\ing in Minnesota. Catherine married 
Joseph Lind and is living in Sycamore. 

The subject of this biography was par- 
tially educated in Sweden. He came to this 
country in 1873, ^nd entered the seminary 
at Paxton, Illinois, the institution being 
shortly afterwards removed to Rock Island, 
and is now known as the Augustana College. 
He was graduated there in 1875, and on 
June 27, of that year, at \'asa, Minnesota, 
was ordained to the ministery. His fiist 
charge was at Chariton, Iowa, where he re- 
mained five 3'ears. From there he wei t to 
Marinette, Wisconsin, where he remained 
three years. His ne.xt move w as to Repub- 
lic, Michigan, and after remaining there for 
about three years, he came to Sycamore, 
and took charge of the Swedish Lutheran 
church, December 22, 18S5. 

Since coming to Sycamore Mr. Fryk- 
man has largely increased the membership. 
On taking charge of the church there were 
about three hundred communicants, and it 
now numbers over five hundred, with a 
membership of about eight hundred. In 
the summer of 1896 he began the erection of 
the new church edifice, and it was dedicated 



rni': iuucraimiicai, rkcoru. 



l-cbniarv :!S, 1S97, at a cost ol over sixteen 
Ih.Hisaiul .1, .liars. It is located uii the cor- 
ner of Somanavik and Charles streets, and is 
one of the finest church buildings in the 
city, l)eing constructed entirely of stone. At 
the dedication services they seated about 
one thousand persons, although the building 
was not intended to seat but about five hun- 
dred. The. congregation was organized 
April 4, 1S70, by R,-v. .\. Unit, of DeKalb. 
He was suecee.led by Rev. X. Xordgren, 

Larson, wh,. was the lirst to locate perma- 
iii.Mills' in Syeaiiioie. lie was succeeded b\ 
.\fr. Frykiiian, who is yet in charge of the 
church. They h,L\e a Sunday school of 
about one hundred members, and Mr. Fryk- 
man conducts one in the country at thel^in- 
dahl schoolhousj, of about forty scholars 
which he visits occasionally. 

Mr. Frykman was united in marriage 
December 4, 1S84, at Marinette, Wiscon- 
sin, to Amanda Odea, daughter of Emanuel 
and Gustave (Anderson) Olson. Her parents 
were from Sweden, where Mrs. Frykman was 
born, and came to the United States in 
1873. They are yet living at Marinette, Wis- 
consin. To. Mr. and Mrs. Frykman seven 
children have been born — Reuben Eman- 
uel, Victor Laurentius, Conrad Theoph- 
ilus, Ruth Gustava Christina, Elmer Augus- 
tiiiues, Hildur Amanda Catherina and Carl 
Magnus. Of these, Reuben and Ruth are 
deceased. 

When in Chariton, Iowa, Mr. Frykman 
was a member of the Iowa conference, and 
served as secretary of the same for two 
years. He served as secretary of the Illi- 
nois conference three years, and in 1894 he 
was elected vice-president of the conference 
and on the president moving outside its 
jurisdiction he took charge as president. 



serving out the term, and was then elected 
president, and has been re-elected every 
year since tliat time. This conference em- 
braces Illinois, Indiana, Michigan and the 
greater part of Wisconsin. Politically Mr. 
P"rvkman is a Republican, but is not a parti- 
san. He is an earnest and indefatigable 
worker in church matters, is an able minis- 
ter and popular among his people and also 
wiih the community. Much credit is due 
him in the building up of so large a congrega 
tion and tin.' erecti(ni of such a tine church 
eilihco. 



JOHN JOHNSON, a veteran of the war 
for the Unionand a retired farmer, now 
resides in a beautiful home in the village of 
Malta. He was born in Sweden, March 21, 
18 JO, and is the son of John and Nellie 
Johnson, both natives of the same country, 
where they Ivied and died. In his native 
land our subject grew to manhood, and re- 
ceived a good common-school education. 
He emigrated to this country in 1854, arriv- 
ing in New York, August ri, where he re- 
mained three months, because of cholera 
being prevalent in Chicago at that time. In 
the fall of the same year he came to Ue Kalb 
county, Illinois, and located in the city of 
De Ivalb, where he worked for the North- 
western Railway Company until the out- 
break of the Civil war. In August, 1862, 
his patriotism was so aroused as to cause 
him to offer his services to his adopted 
country, and he was enrolled as a member 
of Company K, One Hundred and Filth Illi- 
nois Volunteer Infantry, for three years, 
unless sooner discharged. He served under 
Captain Austin and Colonel Dustin, was with 
Sherman on his march to the sea, and was 
in all the important engagements of that 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



memorable campaign. .After ser\ing faiih- 
full\- until the end of the war. he was hon- 
orabl}- discharged at Washington, D. C. 
He also participated in the celebrated grand 
review at Washington cit}-. 

Returning to De Kalb Mr. Johnson was 
again employed by the Northwestern Rail- 
way Compan\', in whose employ he remain- 
ed ten \'ears, during which time he pur- 
chased a farm of eighty acres, which he im- 
proved as the opportunity was afforded him. 
In 1875 he removed to the farm, and con- 
tinued to add to his other improvements by 
fencing, tiling and building. On this farm 
he toiled for twent\' years, confining himself 
to no special line, but engaged in general 
farming. In 1896 he purchased four lots in 
Malta, erected a beautiful house, into which 
he moved with his family, and is now living 
a retired life, while his son, C. O., is work- 
ing the farm in Malta township. 

In 1866, Mr. Johnson married Mrs. Mary 
Ann Johnson, widow of Alexander Johnson, 
and a native of Norwa}', born October 3, 
1840, and who, at the age of twelve years, 
came with her parents to this country, the 
family mo\'ing to De Kalb county, Illinois, 
where her father died in March, 1855, her 
mother long surviving him, dying October 8, 
1890. By her former husband, Mrs. John- 
son had one child, which died soon after 
her marriage with her present husband. 
They are the parents of four sons, C. O., 
Louis, Frank A. and Amos. The son Louis 
has purchased a farm of eiglity acres, in 
Milan township, on which he now resides. 

Mr. and Mrs. Johnson are members of 
the Lutheran church, and wire man led L)y 
a Lutheran minister at Chicago. From the 
general goxernment he receives a small 
pension for his faithfulness to his adopted 
countrv in her davs of need. 



w 



T MOTT CzOBLE resides on section 
9, Paw Paw township, where he 
has a farm of two hundred and twenty-fi\'e 
acres of valuable land. He was born in 
Lee county, Illinois, ]anuar}' 14, 1847, and 
is the son of Tunothy Goble, a na:tive of 
Pennsylvania, born in Luzerne county, in 
1808. The paternal grandfather, Ezekiel 
Goble, was a pioneer of that county, and 
there Timothy grew to manhood and mar- 
ried Elizabeth Ayers, a native of the county, 
where she was reared and educated. By 
trade Timothy Goble was a carpenter and 
joiner, which occupation he followed in his 
native state. In 1843, he came to Illinois, 
and located in Lee county, in the same school 
district where the son now resides. Entering 
eighty acres of land, he at once commenced 
to open up a farm, and later entered fifty 
acres more, giving him a farm of one hun- 
dred and thirty acres, on which he resided 
a number of years, then sold and purchased 
a farm in Paw Paw township, De Kalb coun- 
ty, on which the last years of his life were 
spent. His wife survives him and is yet in 
the enjoyment of good health. Their fam- 
ily consisted of three sons and three daugh- 
ters. Esther married John Brown, but is 
now deceased. Orella married Jacob Rad- 
ley, and they reside at Earl, Illinois. Ayres 
resides at Ayres, Nebraska, where he is 
engaged in the grain business. W. Mott is 
the subject of this sketch. E. T. is a phy- 
sician residing in Earl, Illinois. Mary is 
the wife of Augustus R.cker, of Paw Paw, 
Illinois. 

The subject of this skttch grew to man- 
hood in the vici nty of his present residence, 
spending his bo>huod and youth in labor 
upon the farm, and in attending the common 
schools. He enlisted October 8, i 864, when 
seventeen vears old, bec(jming a member of 



'HE BIOCRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Company D, Thirty-fourth Illiiiois \'ulun- 
teer Infantry, joining the regiment at 
(^loldshoro. North Carolina, and serving 
with it to the close of the war. He was on 
detached duty and was in several battles be- 
fore jnining the regiment , among which was 
the battle r,( Nashville, and the skirmish at 
Raleigh, North Carolina. When he joined tln' 
regiment at Goldsboro it was with Sherman 
in his last campaign. l"rom that place it 
continued on to Washington, and was in 
the grand review. Our subject was dis- 
charged in Louisville, and mustered out in 
Chicago, July 17, 1.S65. 

Returning to his home, Mr. Coble re- 
mained under the parental roof and assisted 
his father until he arrived at mature years. 
He then bought a farm in Wyoming town- 
ship, Lee county, a place of one hundred 
and thirty acres, on which he settled and 
there resided for several years. During 
that time he purchased the farm where he 
now resides, and owned other land in addi- 
tion. He located on his present farm in 
1883, since which time he has been engaged 
in general farming and feeding stock. He 
has on the place an average of one hundred 
head of cattle and about three hundred 
hogs, being one of the largest feeders and 
shippers in the western part of De Kalb 
county, shipping annually from ten to fif- 
teen cars of st<ick. 

Mr. Coble was married in Lee county, 
Illinois, December 25, 1868, tu Miss Susan 
Robinson, a native of Lee county, and a 
daughter of Benjamin Is.. Robinson, an 
early settler of Lee county, but who later 
removed to California. By this union 
there has been eight children. Benjamin 
Ered is now a memlier of the b'irst Illinois 
(-'axalry, under General Ward, and in the 
summer of 1898 was stationed at Chicka- 



mauga awaiting orders to go to Cuba. Lil- 
lian is a young lady of good education, ha\'- 
ing attended the schools at Paw Paw and 
the college at Dixnn, Illinois. She is now 
a teacher in the public schools of Lee coun- 
ty. \'i(.la is a student in the Paw Paw 
schools. I'xrtha is also a student of the 
Paw Paw schools. Clifford, j. Ward. Elsie 
and Glenn are at Imme. 

Politically Mr. Coble is a Republican, 
his first presidential vote being cast in 1868 
for General Grant. He is now ser\ing his 
third term as commissioner of highways, 
and his second term as treasurer of the 
board. For eighteen years he has been a 
member of the school board, thus showing 
his interest in popular education. Frater- 
nally he is a member of Paw Paw Lodge, I. 
O. O. E., and has passed through all the 
chairs and served eight years as lodge dep- 
uty. He is also a member of the encamp- 
ment of that order, being past chief patri- 
arch of the camp at Paw Paw. His inter- 
est in military affairs is shown by his mem- 
l)ership in William H. Thompson Post, No. 
308, G. A. R., of Paw Paw, of which he has 
been a commander for the past two years. 
In every matter pertaining to the best inter- 
ests of his adopted county he is always 
found on the side of riirht. 



HORATIO H. MASON, capitalist, of 
Sycamore, Illinois, is iire-eminently a 
self-made man. He began life with a defi- 
nite purpose in view, worked faithfully and 
honestly, and with a will for its accomplish- 
ment, and now enjoys a reputation that is 
by no means limited to the bomidaries of the 
state. There are three distinct families of 
Masons in America, but who are not, as 




H. H. MASON. 




MRS. H. H. MASON. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1.S7 



erroneously supposed, descended from the 
traditional " three brothers who came over 
at a very early date. " The three progen- 
iters of the Mason family in America were 
of different religious belief and came at dif- 
ferent times. John Mason of Puritan stock 
came in 1630, first settled in Massachusetts, 
and later moved to the Connecticut Colony. 
He was a man of no little prominence, and 
was a principal factor in settling the Piquod 
war. Sampson Mason is the progenitor of 
the family of which our subject is a worthy 
representative. Colonel George Mason, an 
Episcopalian, and a member of the English 
parliament, was third of the name to estab- 
lish a family in America. He was a mem- 
ber of the royal army and colonel of 
cavalry under Charles Stuart, afterwards 
Charles II. After the battle of Worcester, 
which ruined the hopes of Charles II, 
George Mason escaped in disguise, reached 
Norfolk, Virginia, settled in that province, 
and established a family that was prominent 
in colonial affairs during the Revolutionary 
war, as well as in the early struggles of the 
young republic. One of the number was a 
signer of the Declaration of Independence. 
Sampson Mason, known as the Baptist 
officer in Cromwell's army, probably a mem- 
ber of the old ironsides regiment and a rad- 
ical, immigrated to America, about 1650, 
prior to Cromwell's defeat. He settled at 
Rehoboth, Massachusetts, and although 
owning property at Swansea, which he was 
instrumental in establishing, never removed 
there. In earlier generations the family 
lived in Rhode Island, or Massachusetts, 
near the border. One of the founders of 
Swansea became a man of substance and 
one of the proprietors of the "North Pur- 
chase," afterwards the town of Attleboro. 
He advanced thirteen pounds, five shillings 



and ten pence for the prosecution of King 
Phillips War, which amount was voted to 
his wife after his death just at the close of 
the war. Sampson Mason died in Reho- 
both, and was buried September 15, 1676. 
He married Mary Butterworth, who died 
August 29, 1 7 14. 

To Sampson Mason and wife thirteen 
children were born, of whom Peletiah was 
eleventh. He was born in 1669, married 
May 22, 1699, Hepzibah Brooks, daughter 
of Timothy and Mary (Russell) Brooks. 
The latter was a daughter of Elder John 
Russell, Sr. . a noted divine of the colony. 
Peletiah Mason died March 29, 1763, at the 
age of ninety-four years. He was the last 
of six brothers, all of whom attained sev- 
enty years or over. Three of the sons of 
Peletiah Mason were ministers. Job, Rus- 
sell and John were successi\'ely ministers of 
the Second Baptist church of Swansea, 
Massachusetts. According to old records. 
Job was a minister for over forty-seven 
years and was thirty-seven years an elder. 
Rev. Russell, ninth in a family of ten chil- 
dren, was pastor of the Baptist church at 
Swansea over forty years. He was born 
April 21, 1714, and married Rhoda Kings- 
ley, June 5, 1736, by whom he iiad thirteen 
children, of whom Phillip was fifth. The 
latter, born January 29, 1745, married Mary 
Scott, born in March, 1745. Of their 
t\\'elve children, Russell was second. He 
was burn in Providence, Rhode Island, 
Eebruary 25, 1769, and married Ruth Lap- 
ham, born in Smithfield, Rhode Island, 
April 4. 1769. He remo\-ed to Fairfield, 
Herkimer county. New York, in 1794, 
where he owned a large timber tract, which 
he cleared and converted into a fine farm, 
but later mo\'ed to Warren, New York. 
Hiram, seventh in the family of nine chil- 



THE 



IICAL RECORD. 



(Irfii born to Russell and Ruth Mason, was 
liorn in the town ol W'arien, Herkimer 
county. New York, September 17, 1805. 
Hiram Mason, an acti\e, trading, business 
man, pushed his speculations in real estate 
into the state of Michigan, where on one of 
his numerous trips, he died September 14, 
1835, and was followed fi\'e months later, 
Eebruary 29, 1836, by his wife, who was a 
Miss Eannie Brown. She was born in Ger- 
man Flats, Herkimer county, New York, 
August 9, 1808, and was the daughter of 
Henry and Wealthy (Able) Brown, both of 
whom were natives of Colchester, Connec- 
ticut. The former died at the age of sixty- 
three years, while residing in his native 
county. 

The Masons seem to have all been men 
of strong physical and mental attamments, 
men of energy and brains, resourceful, inde- 
pendent and self-reliant. Of such stock 
sprung Horatio H. Mason, the subject of this 
sketch. Born in the town of Warren, Herki- 
mer county, New'^'ork, February 19, 1829. he 
was left an orphan at the age of se\en j'ears, 
and was reared in the family of his grand- 
father Brown, and an uncle. At a very 
early age he became self-supporting, receiv- 
ing before ten years of age, six and eight 
dollars per month fof his services on the 
farm, while many other boys received only 
their board and clothes and very little of the 
latter. At the age of seventeen he went to 
Culpeper county, \'irginia, seeking his for- 
tune in the South. Being recommended by 
an acquaintance to a merchant in the Shen- 
endoah Valley, he was told that if he would 
break a certain colt to ride that he would 
be sent on a collecting tour. Having been 
familiar all his life with h.irses, the task 
was an eas)' one. So successful was he in 
collecting that he was given a position as 



clerk in the store, and there remained two 
years. 

Returning to Herkimer county, Ne\\- 
York, in the village of Little Lakes, Febru- 
ary 28, 1850, Mr. Mason was united in 
marriage with Miss Mary E. Treadway, 
who was born in the town of Warren, New 
York, April 18, 1832. She was the daugh- 
ter of Bella and Philotheta (Marshall) 
TreadwaN'. Her father was an attorney 
and the son of David Treadway, a farmer, 
who was one of the pioneers of Herkimer 
county. Her mother was a daughter of 
John Marshall, who died at the age of 
ninety-seven years, and who was so clear of 
mind and strong of body that he was able 
to transact business up to the date of his 
death. 

About two years after his marriage Mr. 
Mason came west, traveling through parts 
of Michigan, Wisconsin and Illinois, with a 
view of location. He finally decided upon 
Sycamore, Illinois, and in the spring of 
1853 located here and had his family join 
him. He purchased one hundred and sixty 
acres, where his residence now stands, and 
began housekeeping in a log cabin, long 
since removed. The place he began imme- 
diately to improve, planting an orchard and 
ornamental trees and in due time erecting a 
large and commodious dwelling. .^11 the 
ornamental trees around the place to-day 
were planted by him, with the exception of 
a few locust trees, which were standing near 
the cabin when purchased. Much of the 
original farm has since been platted, lots 
have been sold, and many comfortable 
homes erected. 

Soon after hicating in Sycamore our 
subject began speculating in land, buying 
and selling at a profit, and soon accumu- 
lated considerable property for that early 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



189 



day. His good judgment of values, and his 
watchfulness as to the time when sales 
should be made, enabled him at all times 
to place the balance on the right side of the 
ledger. At various times during the last 
forty -five years he has owned seven or eight 
thousand acres of land in Illinois and nearly 
half as many in Iowa. In 1871, with James 
S. Waterman, he established the First Na- 
tional Bank, of Sycamore, the first institu- 
tion of the kind in De Kalb county. He was 
elected vice-president and given the entire 
management of the bank. In 1S75 he sold 
his stock and severed all connections with 
the bank. He later became a stockholder 
in the Sycamore & Cortland Railroad and 
assisted in its promotion and construction. 
For some years he was in the abstract busi- 
ness as a junior member of the firm of 
Bailey & Mason. He is now living retired 
from all business with the exception of the 
management of his financial and real estate 
interests, to which he gives his exclusive at- 
tention. 

Mrs. Mason departed this life in Syca- 
more August 25, 1882, having been the 
mother of four children, two of whom died 
in infancy. The living are Florence and 
Maude M. The former married Walter 
Loomis, who is engaged in the real estate 
business in De Kalb county with our sub- 
ject, and they make their home on the old 
homestead in Sycamore. They have three 
sons, Mason Walter, Samuel Colby and 
Harold Herbert. The second daughter, 
Maude M., married Horace H. Holladay 
and they have one daughter, \'irginia. 
Their home is in Cairo, Illinois, where Mr. 
Holladay is engaged in business. 

In politics Mr. Mason is a Republican, 
but with the exception of one term as alder- 
man he has steadfastly refused to accept 



office. He is a man of strong personality, 
keen perception and possesses great busi- 
ness acumen. He is a citizen of sterling- 
worth and through his own exertions he has 
attained an honorable position and marked 
prestige among the representative men of 
De Kalb county, and with signal consistency 
it may be said that he is the architect of his 
(jwn fortunes and one whose success amply 
justifies the application of the somewhat 
hackneyed but most expressi\-e title "a self 
made man. " His youthful dreams of success 
have been realized and in their happy ful- 
fillment he sees the fitting reward of his 
earnest toil. 



WELLS A. Fx\Y, deceased, was num- 
bered among the very earliest of 
the pioneers of De Kalb county, locating 
here in 1836. He was born in Onondago 
county. New York, November 13, 1814, 
and was the son of Jonathan and Rhoda 
(White) Fay, the former a native of Massa- 
chusetts and the latter of \'ermont. In his 
native state he grew to manhood, and when 
twenty-two years of age came to De Kalb 
county and took up a claim of land in 
Squaw Grove township, comprising some 
three hundred acres, which he entered and 
purchased after it came into market. A 
portion of this land he later sold. On mak- 
ing the claim he at once commenced to im- 
prove the place by the erection of a cabin 
and the breaking of the prairie land. The 
cabin was afterwards replaced with a good, 
comfortable residence, and with the various 
outbuildings erected, together with other 
improvements, he made a farm that com- 
pared well with any of the excellent farms 
in Squaw Grove township. 

On the 8th of June, 1842, he married 



190 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Miss Harriett H. Lay, a native of Connecti- 
cut, and a daughter of Samuel H. and Em- 
ily (Pratt) La_\', both of whom were also 
natives of Connecticut, the former born 
in 1795 and the latter in 1800. In 
1842 Mr. Lay came west and settled on a 
farm in De Kalb county where his last days 
were spent, he dying in 1861, while his 
wife, who survived him a few years, died 
in 1869. In their family were five daugh- 
ters and one son, of whom Mrs. Fay was 
the oldest. One of their daughters, Julia, 
is now the wife of Oscar ^^'hitson, of State 
Center, Iowa. The son, James H. Eay, 
is a farmer now residing in Newport, Ne- 
braska. Mrs. Fay was reared and educated 
in Connecticut, and for one year after her 
arrival in De Kalb county, she engaged in 
teaching. To Mr. and Mrs. Fay five chil- 
dren were born. Emma S. gre\\' to 
womanhood, married Rev. S. P. Gates, a 
minister of the Presbyterian church, and 
they moved to Pennsylvania, where she 
later died leaving one daughter, Sarah. 
Jennie is the wife of E. P. Gardiner, a 
sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this 
\-olume. Alcott N. married and is also en- 
gaged in. farming in De Kalb county. He 
has a family of two sons and one daughter, 
and has lost one son. Ida is the wife of L. 
J. Lamson, who is a member of the Board 
of Trade of Chicago. Ashley H. died at 
the age of seven years. 

In ])olitics Mr. Fay was a Republican, 
and while he ne\er desired public office, he 
was elected and served some years as jus- 
tice of the peace. He took quite an inter- 
est in educational matters and was elected 
and served as school trustee for some years. 
In his early life he was a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, but in later 
life was converted to the Adventist faith. 



although he continued to attend the Method- 
ist church. His wife was a consistent mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church at 
Hinckley. 

In 1882 Mr. Fay rented his farm, pur- 
chased residence property to which he re- 
moved and lived a retired life until his 
death October i, 1897. He was a man 
well known and universally esteemed 
wherever known. Since his death Mrs. 
Fay has bought other residence property in 
Hinckley where she resides and where her 
many friends always receive a hearty wel- 
con.e. 



BENJAMIN F. UPLINGER, dealer in 
lumber, grain, coal, lime, salt, flour 
and feed, is one of Kingston's live business 
men. He was born in Butler township, 
Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, September 
10, 1859, and is the son of John and Eliz- 
abeth (Wood) Uplinger, both natives of 
the same state. John Uplinger was a 
butcher, a business which he carried on in 
connection with farming, and was an active 
and prosperous business man. He re- 
moved from Pennsylvania to Illinois, with 
his family, in i86fi, locating in Kingston 
township, De Kalb county, where he pur- 
chased three himdred and twenty acres of 
improved land, and added to that several 
other farms, which he disposed of at dif- 
ferent times. He was a keen-sighted busi- 
ness man, and was usually in advance of 
his time. He retained two hundred acres 
up to the time of his death, which oc- 
curred October 6, 1893. His wife fol- 
lowed him in July, 1897. They were the 
parents of thirteen children, all of whom 
grew to maturity, and twelve now living. 



THE BIOCxRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Benjamin F. Uplinger was in his seventh 
j-ear when he came with his parents to 
Kingston township. His boyhood and 
youth were spent upon the home farm, and 
his education was obtained in the common 
schools of Kingston. Ho remained with 
his parents until he was twenty-four years 
of age, when he removed to Ivansas, where 
he took up a claim of one hundred and sixty 
acres, as a homestead, also took up a tree 
claim of one hundred and si.xty acres, which 
he now owns. His stay in Ivansas lasted 
but two years, and on his return to Kings- 
ton he took his place on the home farm, 
where he remained three years, at which 
time he removed to the village of Kingston, 
and May 20, 1891, he entered upon his 
present line of business. 

On the 3d of December, 1886, Mr. Up- 
linger was united in marriage with Miss Cal- 
purnia Littrell, a native of Salem, Virginia, 
born March 26, 1867. By this union two 
children have been born; Leon O.. Au- 
gust 21, 1888; and Alfred R., January 13, 
1893. Mr. and Mrs. Uplinger are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which 
he is an official member. He has been 
honored by his townsmen by his election to 
the presidency of the village board for two 
years. He is a member o( the Masonic 
fraternity, and also of the Knights of the 
Globe. No man stands higher in the esti- 
mation of the people of Kingston. He is 
active in business, and falls in line with 
every modern improvement and scheme 
which benefits man and adds value to his 
labor. He has greatly at heart the build- 
ing up of Kingston, a fact which is attested 
by his own commodious business establish- 
ment. His grain trade amounts to about 
two hundred and fifty cars per annum. Po- 
litically he is a Democrat. 



HENRY CLAPSADDLE, who for forty- 
six years has been a resident of De Kalb 
county, is now living a retired life in the 
village of Shabbona. He is a native of 
Herkimer county, New ^'ork, born January 
I, 1S27, and is the son of Dennis Clapsad- 
dle, a native of the same state, born in 1774, 
and a grandson of Major Clapsaddle, who 
was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, in 
which he held a major's commission. The 
Clapsaddles are of German ancestr\', the 
family being among the earl\- settlers of 
New York. Dennis Clapsaddle grew to 
manhood in his native county and state, and 
there married Elizabeth Frank, also a na- 
tive of Herkimer county, and a daughter 
of Squire Frank, of the same county and 
a soldier of the Revolutionary war. l>y 
occupation Dennis Clapsaddle was a farmer, 
and spent his entire life in agricultural pur- 
suits in Herkimer county, dying there in 
1S42. His wife survived him some twenty 
years, dying in 1862. They were the par- 
ents of five sons and six daughters, all of 
whom grew to mature years and married, 
our subject and three sisters being the sole 
siir\'ivors. 

In his native county Henry Clapsaddle 
spent his boyhood and youth on a farm, and 
there received a good common-school edu- 
cation. After his father's death he remained 
with his mother on the old farm until after 
he attained his majority. In 1852 he came 
west to De Kalb county, Illinois, where he 
joined an older brother, Michael Clapsaddle, 
who located here about 1847. He had, 
however, come to De Kalb county two years 
previously and purchased a tract of one hun- 
dred and twenty acres in Paw Paw town- 
ship, after which he returned to New York. 
He was married February 26, 1852, in 
Herkimer county. New York, to Elizabeth 



192 



THI-: lUOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



N. Cross, a native of Herkimer county and 
a daujjhter of Peter and Ora (Ingrahani) 
Cross. 

Soon after his marriage Mr. Clapsaddle 
came to De Kalb county with his young 
bride, and made a permanent location on 
the farm which he had previously purchased. 
There was a log house on the place and in 
that they resided a few years while impro\e- 
ments were being made in the place. Later 
he built a good house and barn, made other 
improvements and there resided twelve \'ears. 
In 1864 he sold that farm and purchased 
and improved one of two hundred acres in 
Shabbona township, which he further im- 
pro\-ed b}- the erection of a large and sub- 
stantial residence, barns and other outbuild- 
ings, and upon that farm he resided for 
twenty-eight years. In 1S91 he rented the 
farm and in 1892 mijved to the village of 
Shabbona, where he purchased lots and 
built a fine residence, which has since been 
his home. He has since sold the farm to 
his son, but owns one of one hundred and 
se\-ent\- acres near Clear Lake. Cerro Gordo 
county, Iowa, a well improved place. Mr. 
and Mrs. Clapsaddle are the parents of 
three children, the first born. Dean, dving 
in childhood. H.J. now owns and operates 
the old home farm. He married Ella Lane 
(jf De Kalb count}'. Delos D. is now mar- 
ried, owns and operates a farm in Cerro 
Gordo count}-, Iowa. He married Mary 
Smith, of De Kalb county, and they have 
two children, Guy and Clare. 

Politically Mr. Clapsaddle is a stanch 
Republican. Before the organization of 
that party he was a free soiler, and in 
1848 voted for Martin \'an Buren, the free 
soil candidate for president. On the or- 
ganization of the Republican part}', and on 
account of his liberty loving principles, he 



naturally drifted into it, and voted for its 
first presidential candidate, John C. Fre- 
mont, in 1S56. He has never missed cast- 
ing his vote for the presidential nominee of 
the party, from that time to the present. 
He has ever taken an active interest in local 
politics, and was first elected commissioner 
of highways in Paw Paw township, serving 
as such until his remo\'al to Shabbona town- 
ship. For eight consecutive years he 
served as supervisor of Shabbona township, 
a portion of which time he served as chair- 
man of the committee on public printing, 
and was on various other committees. He 
also served as township trustee of Paw Paw, 
and has filled the same ofiice in Shabbona 
township. In the various conventions of 
his party he usuallx' serves as a delegate. 
Mr. and Mrs. Clapsaddle are members 
of the Congregational church in Shabbona, 
and he is a member of the official board, 
serving as trustee and deacon. Mrs. Clap- 
saddle is an active worker in the different 
church societies. Fraternall}' he is a Mason, 
first holding membership in the lodge at 
Paw Paw, into which he was initiated about 
1859. He is a charter member of the Blue 
lodge at Shabbona, and has served through 
all the chairs and has also represented his 
lodge in the grand lodge of the state. In 
whatever position he may be found every 
duty is faithfully discharged. He is a man 
greatly esteemed in the communit}' where 
he has so long resided, and his friends are 
many throughout the county. 



EDWARD P. GARDINER, who resides 
on section 19, Squaw Cirove township, 
where he operates a farm of two hundred 
and seventy acres, has been a resident of 
De Kalb countv since 1868. He was born 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



193 



in Middlesex county, Connecticut, Jul}' 29, 
1842, and is the son of Orrin Gardiner, also 
a native of Connecticut, born in 1810, and 
who grew to manhood in his native state, 
and married Cordelia Pratt, who was like- 
wise a native of Connecticut. By occupa- 
tion he was a farmer. In his native state 
he spent his entire life, dying in the spring 
of 1876, at the age of sixty-six years. His 
wife survived him, and died in Aurora, Illi- 
nois, in 1890. Their family consisted of 
two sons and two daughters. Emily grew 
to womanhood, married Dr. T. M. Triplett, 
and they reside in Lmcoln, Nebraska. 
Henry W. resides in Brooklyn, New York, 
where he is engaged in business. Edwin P. 
is the subject of this review. Eanny C. 
married Horace M. Smith, a farmer, and 
they reside at Friend, Saline county, Ne- 
braska. 

The subject of this sketch grew to man- 
hood in his native county, where he received 
a good common-school education. \\'hen a 
young man of twenty, in August, 1862, he 
enlisted in Company C, Twentieth Connect- 
icut Volunteer Infantry, which was assigned 
to the Army of the Potomac, and later 
transferred to the Army of the Cumberland. 
With his regiment he participated in the 
battle of Chancellorsville, where he was shot 
through the right thigh and permanently 
disabled. From the battle-field he was sent 
to the hospital, where he lay for several 
months, and recovering was transferred to 
the veteran reserve corps, and was on guard 
duty at Harrisburg, Philadelphia, Roches- 
ter, New York, and later at Washington, D. 
C, and at the close of the war was guarding 
rebel prisoners at Elniira, New York. In 
July, 1865, he was honorably discharged 
and returned to his home in Connecticut. 
On returning home Mr. Gardiner worked 



on the farm and at such occupations as 
came to hand, and there remained until 
1868, when he came to De Kalb county, 
Illinois, and located at Sandwich, where he 
secured employment with the Sandwich 
Manufacturing Compan}', for thirteen years 
in the shipping department. He then had 
charge of the repair shops for some years. 
On the 4th of October, 1869, he married 
Miss Jennie L. Fay, a native of De Kalb 
county, where she was reared and educated, 
and a daughter of Wells A. Fay, who was 
one of the honored pioneers of the county, 
a sketch of whom appears in this work. By 
this union, three daughters ha\e been born: 
Emma, wife of Jesse J. Nichols, now of 
Crowley county, Kansas; Hattie, v.'ho re- 
sides at home; and Ida, also at home. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. 
Gardiner began their domestic life at Sand- 
wich, where they continued to reside until 
1882, when they moved to the farm, where 
they now reside, and where Mr. Gardiner 
has since been engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits, in which he has been quite successful 
as a general and dairy farmer. Politically, 
he is a Republican and cast his first presi- 
dential ballot for General U. S. Grant. 
Office holding has never been to his taste, 
and he has therefore never engaged in any 
scramble for public office. Both he and his 
wife are members of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church at Hinckley, in which he serves 
as one of the official board. He is a mem- 
ber of the G. A. R. Post at Sandwich, while 
Mrs. Gardiner is a member of the Woman's 
Relief Corps. They are also members of 
the Knights and Ladies of Security at 
Hinckley. He is well known in Somonauk 
township and the southern part of the coun- 
ty and has many warm friends, while Mrs. 
Gardiner, coming as she dcies from an old 



194 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



pioneer family, is also well known ami 
highly respected for her many womanly 
traits of character. 



JLDC.l': WILLIAM L. POND, attorncy- 
at-law, iinil judge of the county court, 
is a resident of the city of De Kalb and is 
a lawyer of well established reputation, one 
of the truly representative members of the 
legal profession of De Kalb count}'. He 
was born in Genoa township, De Kalb coun- 
ty, Illinois, February ii, i860, and is the 
son of Americus H. and Amy N. (Hollem- 
beak) Pond, who were early settlers in this 
county, and whose sketch appears elsewhere 
in this volume. His boyhood and youth 
were spent upon the home farm, and his 
education was received in the district school 
and Genoa High School, from which he 
graduated June ro, iSiSi, in the first class 
graduating therefrom. lie then taught the 
High School at Kiikland one _\-ear, an ex- 
perience to which he looks back with grati- 
tude. In his capacity as teacher he came 
in touch with Young America, in its gener- 
ally unsubdued state. He abandoned school 
teaching, howe\-er, for a vocation for which 
he was more aptly fitted, both by nature 
and education. Enttring the law office of 
Lowell & Carnes, he remained with that 
firm one year and completed his course of 
studies with the firm of Carnes cS; Denton, 
of Sycamore. .After passing a creditable 
e.xamination before the supreme court of 
the state at Ottawa, Illinois, he was ad- 
mitted to the bar June 10, 1S84, and com- 
menced the practice of law at De Kalb, in 
September of the same year. 

On November 9, 18S7, Mr. Pond was 
united in marriage with Miss Alice E. Cole, 
a native of Kingston, Illinois, born April 21, 



I S60, and a daughter of Marcus \Y. and 
Anna E. (^Little) Cole, both of whom were 
natives of New York. [See sketch in an- 
other part of this work.] Mr. and Mrs. 
Pond have one child, a daughter, Jessie A., 
born No\ember 4, iSSS, who is now attend- 
ing the schools of De Kalb. 

In May, 1886, Mr. Pond was elected 
city attorney of De Kalb, an office which he 
ably and conscientiously filled for eleven 
consecutive \-ears, in the meantime ser\-ing 
one term on the board of education. In 
January, 1887, he formed a partnership 
with Judge Luther Lowell, which continued 
two years, having offices in Sycamore and 
De Kalb. He then practiced alone until 
January i, 1895, when he formed a part- 
nership with A. G. Kennedy, who had just 
located in De Kalb. This partnership con- 
tinued until June, 1897, when it was dis- 
solved just prior to the election of Mr. Pond 
as county judge. At that time he was 
elected to fill a vacancy, and in the summer 
of 1898 he received the Republican nomi- 
nation to the office for the full term. 

Fraternally Judge Pond is a member of 
De Kalb Lodge, No. 144, A. F. & A. M., 
and also of De Kalb Chapter, No. 52, R. 
A. M., De Kalb Council, No. 81, and Syca- 
more Commandery, No. 15, K. T. Among 
other fraternal organizations of which he is 
a member are the Modern Woodmen of 
America, Royal Arcanum, Knights of the 
Globe, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and Knights of the Maccabees. Judge Pond 
is honored and esteemed, not only for his 
legal acumen and business ability, but for 
his sterling personal worth. Upright, re- 
liable and honorable, his strict adherence 
to principle commands the respect of all. 
He is a stanch Republican, adhering to the 
true principles of the party, principles which 




JUDGE W. L. POND. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



197 



he has advocated since attaining his majoritj-. 
He is a genial, courteous gentleman, a pleas- 
ant, entertaining companion, and has man\ 
admiring friends among all classes of men. 



ROBERT BOSTON is not only a pioneer 
of De Kalb county, where he has re- 
sided since 1845, but is also a \eteran of 
the Civil war. He is a native of Canada, 
born near London February 13, 1S40. His 
father, Thomas I?oston, was a natixc of 
Scotland, where he grew to manhood, emi- 
grating from that coimtry to Canada where 
he opened up a farm, clearing it of timber 
and making a home in the wilderness. He 
there married Mary Ann Jones, a nati\e of 
Canada, of Welsh parentage. In 1838 he 
came to Illinois and selected a location for 
a future residence and for a time worked on 
a farm and later on the dam at Di.xon, Illi- 
nois, the first dam built across Rock ri\-er. 
He later returned to Canada and there mar- 
ried, and in 1845 returned with his family 
and purchased a tract of one hundred and 
twenty acres of Mr. Ross. On coming here 
he resided for two or three years with the 
father of his wife, then built his residence, 
hauling the lumber from Chicago with an ox 
team. Fencing the place he commenced 
its improvement and later purchased one 
hundred and twenty acres additional, giving 
him a fine farm of two hundred and forty 
acres, on which he continued to reside dur- 
ing the remainder of his life, his death oc- 
curring in I 866 at the age of se\'enty-three 
years. His wife survives him and is now 
seventy-seven years old. Of their family 
of eight children, seven grew tn mature 
years and five are now living. 

Robert Boston grew to manhood on the 
home farm in Paw Paw township and was 



educated in the district schools. He re- 
mained with his father doing his share of 
the farm work until .August 13, 1.S61, when 
he enlisted m Company 1, Fourth Illinois 
Cavalry, his regiment later being assigned 
to the Army of the Tennessee. With it he 
participated in the battles of F"ort Henry, 
Fort Donelson, Shiloh, Corinth, the siege of 
Vicksburg, the battles of Jackson, Black 
River and Coffeyville, together with a num- 
ber of minor engagements. .U Shiloh he 
was struck by an exploded shell, his gun 
being shot away, but he only received a 
mere scratch on the ear, but he considered 
it quite a close call. He enlisted as a 
private and was appointed corporal and 
later sergeant, ser\ing as such until the ex- 
piration of his term of service. He was dis- 
charged at Springfield, Illinois, November 8, 
1S64. after serving about three years and 
three months. 

After receiving his discharge, Mr. Bos- 
ton returned home, and continued work 
with his father until thelatter's death, when 
he purchased the interests of the other 
heirs and succeeded to the home place. 
He was married October 17, 1867, to Lucy 
S. Place, a native of New York, but reared 
and educated in Paw Paw township, and a 
daughter of George Place, one of the early 
settlers of De Kalb county. l)y this union 
there is one son living, R. Stanton, who is 
married and engaged in farming in Paw 
Paw township. They lost one daughter, 
Nettie, who died in 1S86, at the age of 
se\'enteen years. 

Politically Mr. Boston is a stanch Re- 
publican, and has voted for every nominee 
of the party for president since he cast his 
ballot for Lincoln in 1864. He was elected 
and served as township collector one term, 
for eight consecutive years has been assessor 



igS 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of the township, was township clerk two 
or three years, and also served as township 
treasurer. For some twenty years he 
served as school director, being clerk and 
president of the board at different times. He 
is a member of the Rollo Congregational 
church, in which he takes an active part, 
and fraternally he is a member of Shabbona 
Pcjst, G. .■\. R. As a citizen he has done 
his full share in the development of his 
adopted county, and by one and all is held 
in the highest esteem. 



W INFIELD S. CLARK has a reputa- 
tion of being one of the best photog- 
raphers in northern Illinois. His gallery at 
Sycamore is well eipiipped for the produc- 
tion of e\ery kind of photographic work, 
and he at all times keeps in touch with the 
latest improvements made. He is a native 
of New Milfurd, Illinois, born January i, 
1852, and is the son of James H. and Nancy 
M. (Horton) Clark, both of whom were na- 
tives of Ithica, New York. They came to 
Illinois in about 1S38, settling at New Mill- 
ford, Winnebago county, where they en- 
gaged in farming. In politics he was an 
.Vbolitionist, but became a Republican on 
the organization of that party. His wife 
died at New Milford in 1873, while he sur- 
vived her some fifteen years, dying in 1888. 
They were the parents of three children: 
Charles M., Livonia C. and Winfield S. 
Livonia is now the wife of E. H. Mande- 
\ille, and the\- reside in Fresno, California. 
The subject of this sketch lived at New 
Milford until he was ten years of age, when 
the family moved to Rockford, Illinois, where 
he grew to manhood and was educated in 
its public schools, after which he learned 
the photograph business in that place and 



then went to Chicago, where he engaged in 
the business for two years. I'rom Chicago 
he went to Paw Paw, Illinois, where he 
carried on the business for five >ears, and 
then located at Sycamore, coming to this 
place in 1887, where he has since continued 
to remain. 

Mr. Clark was united in marriage at 
Paw Paw, January 27, 1882, with Miss Al- 
meda M. Hicks, a daughter of Henry R. 
and Adelaide M. (Matthews) Hicks, both of 
whom were natives of New London, Con- 
necticut. Mr. and Mrs. Clark are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church and are 
active in church work. In politics he is a 
Republican, and fraternall}' he is a member 
of the Modern \^'oodmen of America. As 
a citizen he is progressive, and, socially, he 
and his wife are held in the highest esteem. 
Since coming to Sycamore he has built up 
an e.xtensive and high-class patronage, and 
has a prosperous business. 



DA\'ID N. CORY, who resides on a farnr 
of one hundred and thirt}'-five acres, 
in section 10, Paw Paw township, is a native 
of De Kalb count}', born on the farm where 
he now resides, ]uly 29, 1854. His father, 
Jesse Cor_\', was a native' of New Jersey, 
born in 181 8, and removed with his parents 
to Orange county. New York, when a child, 
and there grew to manhood. He was a well 
educated man, and for a number of years en- 
engaged in teaching in the public schools. In 
Tompkins county, New ^■ork, he married 
Catherine Nicholson, a native of that county, 
and shortly afterward came to Illinois and 
first located in Kendall county, where he 
remained a short time, and then moved to 
Winnebago count}', but later returned to 
New York. Two years residence in his 



^HE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



hative state decided him that the west was 
the place lor one to succeed in life. He 
therefore came to De Kalb count)-, llhnois, 
and entered the land where his son now 
resides. He was one of the first settlers on 
the prairie. 

After locating upon the place Jesse Ci-ir\- 
erected a small house, in which the faniil}- 
resided for a few 3'ears, when he built a 
more modern residence with {^ood barns and 
other outbuildings, making a valuable farm 
of one hundred and eighty acres. On that 
farm he spent the remainder of his life, d\- 
ing in i8Si, at the age of si.xty-three }ears. 
His wife sur\-ived him and died on February 
13, 1893, when about seventy-seven years 
old. He was a pioneer teacher of De Kalb 
county, and taught many winter terms of 
school «'hile engaged in impro\'ing his 
farm. He held many positions oi honor 
and trust in his township, serving as town- 
ship treasurer for about twenty-h\e }ears. 
His experience as a teacher made In'm de- 
sirous of obtaining good schools, and he 
therefore used his influence in that du'ection. 
Fraternally he was a member of Shabbona 
Lodge, A. F. & A. .\1. Jesse and Catherine 
Cor)' were the parents of eiglit chihiren, four 
of whom grew to mature ^-ears. Susan is 
the wife of H. I^. Terpening, a farmer of 
\'ermillion count)-, Illinois. Elizabeth is 
the wife of William Campbell, of Janesville, 
Wisconsin. Andrew A. resides in Chicago, 
where he is employed as a conductor on the 
street railwa)-. David X. is the subject of 
this sketch. 

Daxid N. Cory grew to manhood on 
the home farm and receiv'ed his educa- 
tion in the common school and East Paw- 
Paw Seminar)-. He assisted his father on 
the farm until the latter's death, when he 
took charge of the place, and later pur- 



chased the interests of the other heirs. 
Since coming in possession of the estate he 
has added materiall)- to the improvements, 
and has now one of the most \-aluable farms 
in the town. In his chosen occupation he 
has been successful, and in addition to 
general farmmg has engaged in breeding to 
some extent high grade stock. He was 
married in De Kalb county, January 28, 
1880, to Miss Susan James, a nati\-e of 
Ivendall count)-, Illinois, but w-ho spent the 
great part of her life in De Kalb count)-. 
A well educated lad)-, she w-as for some 
)-ears a teacher in the public schools prior 
to her marriage. She is a daughter of F. 
M. janies, of Sipiaw Grove township. By 
this union there are two children, Ralph 
and Jessie, students in the home school. 

.\ life long l-iepulilican, Mr. Cory cast 
his first presidential ballot for U. S. Grant 
in 1868. He has taken quite an active part 
in local politics, and in variiuis campaigns 
has contributed of his time and means. 
For three terms he has scr\ ed as township 
collector, and has also ser\-ed as supervisor 
of his township, making an efficient mem- 
ber, and serving on the committees on edu- 
cation, real estate and assessments, and 
some others. Mrs. Cory is a member of 
the Congregational church of Rollo, and 
fraternally he is a member of Shabbona 
lodge, A. F. cS: A. M. I-5oth are highly re- 
spected citizens of the township and have 
many friends with whom they are hel<l in 
the highest esteetn. 



LCCIAX DODGE, a retired farmer resid- 
ing in De Kalb, has been a resident of 
the count)- since 1863, thirty- two years of 
which time he spent in arduous toil upon 
the farm, and bv his industrv and thrift he 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



is now permitted to live in ease and retire- 
ment. He is a nati\e of \'ermont, born at 
Mt. Holly, June 19, 1S43, and is the son of 
Thomas and Eliza (Connant) Dodge, the 
former born at Durham Flats, Canada, Feb- 
ruary 2. 1809, and the latter in Townsend, 
Massachusetts, SejHember 12, 1807. Thomas 
Dodge was a large landowner, having some 
fourteen hundred acres under his control. 
He removed from Canada to \'ermont, at 
the close of the war of 1S12, in company 
with his father, Abram Dodge, locating near 
Mt. Holly, \"ermont. In that state he at- 
tained some prominence, serving in the leg- 
islature of that state for one term. In 1 863, 
he came to De Kalb county, Illinois, and 
purchased what was then known as the \'an 
Wert property. Politically he was a Re- 
publican, and was alvva\-s interested in po- 
litical affairs. He died December 29, 1893, 
and his wife March 23, 1875. Their famil\- 
consisted of three sons; Thomas W'., born 
May 30, 1838; Rollin, October 13, 1841: 
and Lucian, as noted above. All were born 
at Mt. Holly, \'ermont. 

Lucian Dodge was reared and received 
his primary education at .Mt. Holly, Ver- 
mont, and afterward took a course at Black 
River Academy, Ludlow, \'ermont. He 
was twenty years of age when he accom- 
panied his parents to De Kalb county, Illi- 
nois. He at once engaged in farming, which 
he successfully carried on until 1895, when 
he removed to the city of De Kalb, where 
he now lives in retirement, enjoying the 
fruits of his former toil. 

On the 22nd of October, 189 1, Mr. 
Dodge was united in marriage with Miss 
Cora A. Tiffany, a native of Darien, Wis- 
consin, born December 6, i860, and the 
daughter of Vester and Louise fBlodgettj 
Tiffany, both natives of Hartford, Pennsvl- 



^•ania. from which place in 1S57 they re- 
moved to Wisconsin, where they remained 
for several years. They next moved to 
Iowa, where Mr. Tiflany died in February, 
1S92, in his sixty-fifth year. His widow 
then came to De Kalb county, Illinois, where 
she now resides. They reared a family of 
eight children. Jessie is the wife of Dr. A. 
T. Pierc}-, Placerville, California. Ida mar- 
ried Rev. C. W. Pruitt, and died October 
19, 1884, at Cheefoo. China, after having 
lived in China several _\-ears as a missionar}-. 
Cora is the wife of our subject. William is 
a farmer at Independe:ice, Iowa. Elmer is 
a practicing physician of Modera, Califor- 
nia. Edward is a physician of Plymouth, 
California. Belle resides in Placerville, Cal- 
ifornia. Herbert is a bookkeeper in Chi- 
cago, and served in the war with Spain. 
The Tiffanys are of English extraction, and 
some of that name emigrated to the New 
\\'or]d in 1600, and located at Attlebury, 
Massachusetts. Colonel .Amos Tiffany, the 
grandfather of Mrs. Dodge, was an officer 
in the war of 1812 and fought valiantly for 
his country. Her maternal great- grandfa- 
ther, Timothy Blodgett, was a soldier in the 
Revolutionary war. The Blodgetts are also 
of English extraction, the first of the name 
locating in Cambridge, Massachusetts, as 
early as 1635. coming to the New \\'orld in 
the ship Increase. 

The Dodges are of Scotch descent, and 
were early settlers in this country. Abra- 
ham Dodge, the grandfather of our subject, 
took an active part in the war of the Revo- 
lution. Lucian Dodge, in addition to his 
fine farm of four hundred acres in DeKalb 
township, owns a beautiful residence in the 
city. For some years he engaged in general 
farming, but of late years confined himself 
principally to dairying. Success crowned 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECOPJ 



his efforts, and he is now numbered among 
the well-to-do citizens of De Kalb county. 
Fraternally, he is a Mason and a firm be- 
liever in the principles of that order. Polit- 
ically, he is a Republican. 



DANIEL HOHM, who is now serving 
as marshal of the \illage of Hinckley, 
is a well known citizen of the county, of 
which he has been a resident since 1878. 
He was born in New York city September 
15, i860, and is the son of Vincent Hohm, 
a native of Germany, who came to the 
New World after attaining his majorit\-, 
locating in New York city, where he mar- 
ried Charlotte Schneider, also a native of 
Germany. By trade he \\as a shoemaker, 
at which he worked in New York about 
four years. In 1862 he removed to Piano, 
Illinois, where he engaged in business, and 
there resided until 1878, when he moved 
with his family to \'ictor township, De Kalb 
county. 

Daniel Hohm, our subject, grew to man- 
hood in Piano, Illinois, where he obtained 
a limited education in the public schools. 
From the age of ten years he has made his 
own living in the world, at that time com- 
mencing work in a livery barn. In 1878 
he came with the family to De Kalb county, 
and for two 3ears worked upon a farm, then 
engaged with George Watson, and after- 
terwards with Joseph Glidden and others 
in the care of their horses. In 1885 he 
mo\^ed to Hinckley, where he engaged in 
the liver}- business. One year later he was 
burned out, suffering considerable loss, but 
later rebuilt the livery barn which he still 
owns, and for ten years was actively en- 
gaged in the livery business, in which he 
had a nice and satisfactory trade. During 



those ten years he was also engaged in buy- 
ing and shipping fine coach and driving 
horses, his market being principally Chicago, 
although he would occasionally make ship- 
ment to New York cit)-. 

Mr. Hohm was married in Hinckley, 
March 31, 1885, to Miss Bertha Bastian, a 
native of De Kalb count)', Illinois, and a 
daughter of August Bastian, one of the 
early settlers of De Kalb county, and a sub- 
stantial farmer of Squaw Grove township. 
By this union there are three children, May, 
Lola and Harle}'. 

In 1895 Mr. Hohm was appointed mar- 
shal by the town board of Hinckley, and 
accepting the office he rented his livery 
barn, sold his stock, and has since given his 
entire attention to the duties of the office. 
In the discharge of the duties of the office 
of marshal he has been brought incon- 
tact with leading citizens of the county, 
who recognizing his abiltity as an officer 
lent their active support to his candidacy, 
and assisted him in securing him the nomi- 
nation for sheriff of De Kalb county in the 
Republican county convention of 1898. He 
has the confidence and esteem of those with 
whom he is acquainted, and they are all 
confident of his election. He has been a 
life-long Republican, and an earnest sup- 
porter of the men and measures of that 
part\-. Fraternally he is a Mason, a mem- 
ber of Hinckley Blue Lodge, Sandwich Chap- 
ter and Sycamore Commandery. Asa busi- 
ness man, he has always been enterprisuig, 
endeavoring not only to advance his own 
good, but that of the community m which 
he resided. By his own industry, he has 
accumulated a fair property, and is recog- 
nized as one of the best men in the village 
of Hinckley, with friends scattered through- 
out the entire county. On the 9th of June, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1898, at Sugar (irove, Illinois, he sustained 
some injuries and a general shake up in a 
railroad accident at that time and place. 
He feels fortunate that the injuries recei\ed 
were no worse. Init he was badly bruised 
and disabled for duty for several weeks. 



WILLIAM LAHKAXT, a retired mer- 
chant residing in Malta, Illinois, is a 
native of Massilon, Stark o.unty, Ohio, born 
September 1, iS:;:;, and is the son of Jon- 
athan and Mari.;arct ( Isenbrigh) LabranI, 
both natives of C.cnnany, whtj emigrated to 
this country about iS:;j, h .rating near Mas- 
silcjn, Ohi.). Wlule resi.ling in his native 
country, Jonathan Labrant served as a me- 
chanic, but after his emigration to this 
country he engaged in farming, which was 
his occupation during the remainder of his 
life. In 1843, he retno\ed to Crawford 
count}-, Ohio, where he leased a large tract 
of land, which he cleared, turning it into a 
\-aluable and productive farm. On that 
farm he remained until 1851, when, with 
his family, he came to De Kalb county, 
Illinois, where he purchased eighty acres of 
land in Pierce township, which he at once 
began to improve, and on which he resided 
until 1868, when he' sold the same at an 
advanced price. He then removed to the 
village of Malta, where he Ined until 1870, 
when he exchanged his Malta property for 
Sandwich property, to which place he re- 
moved, having two daughters residing there. 
His death occurred at that place in June, 
1S76, at the age of si.xty-seven. His wife's 
death occurred July 9, 1879, also at the age 
of si.\ty-seven years. They were consistent 
and upright people, members of the German 
Evangelical church. 

Of the familvof twelve children born to 



Jonathan and Margaret Labrant, the sub- 
ject of this sketch was the eldest. In his 
native state he received his primary edu- 
cation, which was supplemented bv one or 
two terms of school, after his removal to 
I)e Kalb county, Illinois, when in his eight- 
eenth \ear. While yet residing in Crawford 
count}-, Ohio, he assisted his father in clear- 
ing and cultivating the home farm. He left 
his father's roof at the age of twenty, and 
for two years subsequent worked on a 
faun. In the following year he engaged 
with I'rederick Streelv to learn the carpen- 
ter's trade, and was with him one year. In 
1859, he removed to Missouri, where he 
worked at his trade until i86t, when he re- 
turned to De Kalb county, and in i S62 he 
was appointed postmaster of Pierceville, 
Illinois, an office which he honestly and 
honorably filled. In 1865. he removed to 
Malta, Illinois, where for the first two years 
he was engaged at working at his trade, 
after which he formed a partnership with 
P. C. Wagner, of De Kalb, and opened the 
first furniture and undertaking establish- 
ment in Malta. This business was carried 
on by the firm for two years, when Mr. La- 
brant purchased Mr. Wagner's interest. A 
larger store room was built to accommodate 
his growing trade, and he continued in the 
business until 1889, when he sold out to 
Mrs. Leatherby, and removed to Ashton, 
Illinois, where, because nothing better 
offered, he kept hotel. This proving dis- 
agreeable to himself and family, he aban- 
doned it. and removed to Aurora, Illinois, 
but seeing no opening there, he returned to 
Malta and bought back from Mrs. Leath- 
erb_\' his old business, which he followed 
until 1891. when he sold out to Dr, Badg- 
ley, and has since lived a retired life. 

On the 23d of November. 18C2. Mr. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Labrant was joined in wedlock with Miss 
Elizabeth Ann M3-ers. born in 1845, ^nd a 
daughter of George W. and Xaoma (Eberl)-) 
Myers. By this union were five children, of 
whom Edward E. is deceased. The living 
are Cora E., Myrtie M.. Maude O. and Roy 
W. Mrs. Labrant died December 6, 1890, 
and May 4, 1892, Mr. Labrant was joined 
in marriage with .Mrs. Jane A. Harrington, 
widow of H. H. Harrington, of Malta. She 
was born March 11, 1843, and was eleven 
years of age when she came with her par- 
rents to De Kalb count}'. She is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. For 
a number of years Mr. Labrant was a mem- 
ber and an officer in the same church, hold- 
ing the office of class leader and steward to 
the entire satisfaction of his brethren. 
Some years ago he did that which all men 
have a right to do. After due deliberation, 
he changed his religious belief, and is now a 
member and elder in the Advent church of 
De Kalb, Illinois. Politically he is a Re- 
publican. 



FRANK A. LA POI^TE, an enterprising 
farmer residing in section 8, Paw Paw- 
township, owns and operates a farm of 
three hundred and si.\ty acres, three and 
three-fourths miles east of Paw Paw. He 
is a native o( Paw Paw township, born No- 
vember 6, i860, and is the son of Alonzo 
La Porte, a native of New York, born in 
1826 at Sackett's Harbor, near the Thou- 
sand Islands. The paternal grandfather, 
Narcis La Porte, was a native of France 
and a pioneer of Sackett's Harbor. He 
moved west with his family in 1837 and lo- 
lated at Sugar Grove, Kane county, Illi- 
nois, where he engagetl at his trade of 
blacksmithing, and there reared his family. 



He some years later, however, moved to 
De Kalb county and settled on a farm in 
Paw Paw township. 

Alonzo La Porte was eleven years of 
age when he accompanied his father to 
Sugar Grove, Kane county, Illinois, and on 
a farm in that township grew to manhood 
and whenever possible attended the com- 
mon schools where he received a fair edu- 
cation. From Sugar Grove he came to 
De Kalb county in 1848 and here married 
Thirza A. H\de, a daughter of James and 
Ruth Hyde, who were early settlers in De 
Kalb county. They became the parents of 
two sons and four daughters, all of whom 
grew to mature years and married and all 
are living save one daughter. The wife and 
mother died about 1882. 

Alonzo La Porte was a soldier in the 
Me.xican war, and three times walked across 
the plains, first as a soldier to Santa Fe, 
ne.xt to California in 1S50, and later to 
Pike's Peak. With a land warrant he en- 
tered one hundred and sixty acres and later 
added to his possessions until he now owns 
over eight hundred acres in Paw Paw town- 
ship. For 3-ears he was actively engaged 
in farming, but in 1893 mo\ed to the village 
of Paw Paw where he is now living a re- 
tired life. He was quite active in local 
affairs in his township and served as super- 
visor and in other positions of honor and 
trust. 

On the home farm in Paw Paw township 
our subject passed his boyhood and youth, 
and after attending the district schools, 
finished his course in the East Paw Paw 
Seminary, once a noted educational institu- 
tion. He remained under the parental 
roof until after attaining his majority, and 
assisted in carrying on the farm until 
twentv-five \ears of age. He was married 



204 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RPXORD. 



in Clinton township, De Kalb county, May 
12, 1S87, to Miss Margaret F"raser, a 
daughter of Edwin Eraser, an early settler 
and a substantial farmer of that township. 
Hy this union there are two children, Thirza 
M. and Erank A. 

After marriage Mr. Ea Porte settled on 
the farm where he now resides, which tiien 
consisted of two hundred and eighty acres. 
Eater he purchased eighty acres additional, 
and has now a well improved and valuable 
farm of three hundred and sixty acres. 
With general farming he combines stock 
raising, feeding and preparing for market, 
about six carloads of stock annually, which 
he ships to Chicago. He has been quite 
successful in his farming operations, and is 
regarded as one of the best farmers in the 
community. His first presidential vote was 
in 1884, when he voted for James G. Blaine. 
He has since been an earnest advocate of the 
principles of the Republican party. He has 
never desired nor has he ever held public of- 
his tastes and inclinations not running in that 
direction. In 1884 he rented his farm and 
moved to Paw Paw and there engaged in mer- 
chandising in partnership with his brother 
James H. Ea Porte. After three years suc- 
cessful experience in that line, he sold his 
interest in the store, and for a time was not 
actively engaged in any business. While 
residing in the village he served two years 
as a member of the board of trustees, and 
also served on the school board. In the 
spring of 1898 he returned to his farm, 
where he is now actively employed, and 
with the same characteristic energy dis- 
played in past years, will no doubt meet 
with good success. His life has been an 
active one, and he is well known and has 
many friends in Dc I\alli and Eee coun- 
ties, 



ASHER DOWNER, residing on section 
32, Milan township, is one of the most 
progressive farmers in De Kalb county, and 
owns and operates a farm of four hundred 
and forty acres, which is under the highest 
state of cultivation. He is a native of On- 
tario, Canada, born near Montreal, August 
30. I 832, and is the son of Abel Downer, a 
nati\'e of Winchester, Vermont, born in 
1791. His paternal grandfather Downer 
was a pioneer of Vermont, and Abel Downer 
there grew to manhood, and when a young 
man went to Canada, where he married 
I^ucinda Eoomer, a native of Canada, born 
on an island in the St. Lawrence river. 
After his marriage he engaged in farming in 
Canada for a few years, but being dissatis- 
fied with the country, in 1837, he came to 
Illinois, looking for a location, but made no 
selection and came the second time for the 
same purpose, removing to the state in 
1840, locating at Aurora, Kane county, 
which was then but an insignificant village. 
He made a claim some two miles from the 
village, and commenced the erection of a 
dwelling house, which was burned before 
completion, taking fire from one of the 
numerous prairie fires. He then built in 
the village a small house and there resided 
four years while opening up the farm. 
Erecting a good house upon the place, he 
removed to the farm and there spent the 
last years of his life, dying in June, 1864. 
His wife survived him and passed away in 
June, 1885. Of their family of eight chil- 
dren, three sons and two daughters yet sur- 
vive. 

Asher Downer was reared at Aurora and 
on the old homestead near that place, and 
had but common-school ad\antages. He 
remaineii with his father until twenty-five 
years of age and assisted him in carrying on 




ASHER DOWNER. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the home farm. In 1S5S, at Batavia, Illi- 
nois, he was united in marria^'e with Miss 
EHzabeth Curtis, a native of New York and 
a daughter of Ephraim Curtis, an earl)- set- 
tler of Kane county. By this union were 
three children, Fred C. , H. C. and Mary S., 
all of whom yet remain at home, the sons 
assisting in the farm work and the daughter 
now acting as housekeeper for the family. 

Immediately after his marriage, Mr. 
Downer came to De Kalb county and set- 
tled on a farm of one hundred and si.xty 
acres of raw prairie land, purchased by his 
father in Milan township, and at a time 
when there were but few settlers in the 
township. Erecting a small house, he 
commenced breaking the ground and placing 
the farm under cultivation. Success 
crowned his efforts, and he after added to 
his possessions until he now owns four hun- 
dred and forty acres all in one bod}-. The 
small house originally erected has given 
place to a larger and more substantial one, 
and a large barn has been built together 
with various outbuildings and over three 
miles of hedge fence enclosed the place. 
The pumps which supply the stock with 
water are operated by a gasoline engine 
which also runs a feed mill that grinds feed 
for the stock. The farm is one of the best 
improved in De Kalb county. 

Mrs. Downer, who for thirts' years was 
indeed a helpmeet to her husband, passed 
to her reward in December, 1888, leaving 
not only the family, but many friends to 
mourn her loss. Politically Mr. Downer 
has been a Republican since the organiza- 
tion of the party. He never desired nor 
would he ever hold office, preferring to give 
his time and attention to his business inter- 
ests. Both sons are also stanch Repub- 
licans, H. C. having been elected and serv- 



ing as justice of the peace for several years. 
For fifty-eight years Mr. Downer has been 
a resident of the state and for forty years a 
resident of De Kalb county. In its devel- 
opemnt it will certainly be acknowledged 
that he has done his full share. 



HECTOR H. COLEMAN, for many 
years was one of the leading agricult- 
uralists of Mayfield township, was born 
March 11, 1S37, in Orange county. New 
York, and is the son of John and Phcebe 
(Ketcham) Coleman, both of whom were 
natives of the same county, the former born 
November 8, 1791, and the latter August 
25, 1805. They were the parents of five 
children, of whom one besides our subject, 
Charles \\\, is yet surviving. By a former 
marriage there were ten children, of whom 
the following are li\-ing; John, residing in 
New York City; James H., at Sing Sing, 
New York; Hiram, in Johnston, Michigan, 
[ohn Coleman, the father, was by occu- 
pation a farmer, and in early life was a 
Whig, and later a Republican. Religiously 
he was a member of the Presbyterian church. 
During the second war with Great Britain 
he served acceptably as one of the members 
of a New York regiment. His death oc- 
curred in Orange county. New York, No- 
vember 9, 1859. His wife survived him 
many years, dying December i, 1890, in 
her eighty-sixth year, at the home of her son 
in Mayfield township. The Coleman fam- 
ily were established in the United States in 
a very early day, three brothers coming 
from England, locating on Long Island 
about 1760, and from there moving to 
Orange county. New York, settling near 
Goshen, where the grandfather of our sub- 



208 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ject, Nathan Coleman, and sreat-grand- 
father lived and died. 

The subject of this sketch was reared on 
the home farm in Orange county, and there 
received his education in the common 
schools. In October, 1875, he started for 
the west, coming direct to DeKalb county, 
locating on section 1, Mayfield township, 
where lie engaged in farming, and there re- 
mained until 1897, when he built a nice 
residence on Main street, Sycamore, to 
which he removed. He acquired in May- 
field township two hundred and twenty-fi\e 
acres of land, which he still owns and where 
he carried on general farming. He now 
leases his farm and is living a quiet, retired 
life. In addition to his family residence, 
he is also the owner of another dwelling in 
the city of Sycamore. 

Mr. Coleman was married November 30, 
1861, in Mayfield township, to Mary R. 
Mackey, daughter of Harrison and Mar\- 
(Hall) Mackey. She is a native of Orange 
county. New Voik, and came west with her 
parents when (juite young. Her father was 
born in Ulster county. New '^'ork, and set- 
tled in Mayfield township, in the spring 
of 1839. locating on government land, 
being farther back on the prairie than 
any other family. Her father died August 
22, 1890, blither mother died many years 
before, her death occurring January 22, 
1856, in Mayfield township. She was a 
native of Sullivan county. New York, and 
was the mother of three children — Mary R. , 
Eliza J. and Julia A. The latter, who was the 
wife of John Westlake, died Aprils, 1869. 
Eliza J. IS the wife of J. E. Parker, of 
Sycamore. 

Mr. and Mrs. Coleman have one child, 
Harrison M., born February 19, 1863. He 
grew to manhood in Mayfield township, and 



there married Katherine Ells, August 28, 
1886. She is the daughter of George and 
Elizabeth Ells. They have two children — 
Ruth and Clare. They reside on section 1 1, 
Mayfield township, where he is engaged in 
farming on the old farm of his grandfather, 
Harrison Mackey. 

In politics Mr. Coleman is a Republican, 
in the jirinciples of which party he has un- 
bounded faith. By his fellow-citizens he 
was elected school director, and has also 
held other local positions. He and his 
wife are devoted members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, in the work of which 
they take special interest. As a farmer, 
Mr. Coleman has aided largely in the devel- 
opment of the agricultural interests of De 
Kalb county. As a citizen he is held in 
the highest esteem, having many friends 
scattered throughout the county. 



JAMES LANE, who resides on section 13, 
Shabbona township, has a fine farm of 
one hundred and eighty-five acres, lying in 
sections 13 and 24. He is a native of Eng- 
land, born m Dartford, near London, No- 
vember 23, 1836, and is the son of Henry 
and Mary (Luxford) Lane, both of whom 
were also natives of England, where their 
entire lives were passed. They were the 
parents of eleven children, all of whom grew i 

to mature years. In his native country I 

James Lane grew to manhood, his educa- 
tional advantages being very limited. On 
the 23d of May, 1858, he was married in | 

Kent, England, to Ann Maria Johnson, a j 

native of England, who was reared and ed- I 

ucated at Rent. One year later, with his 
young bride, he took ship at the London 
dock in a sailing vessel, the Daniel Webster, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



209 



for the United States, and were seven weeks 
on the broad Atlantic, daring which time 
they encountered several severe storms, in 
one of which the main mast of the vessel 
was carried away. They arrived in New 
York in May, 1859, and immediately came 
west to Illinois, locating in Somonauk, De 
Kalb county, where Mr. Lane had an aunt 
residing. 

On his arrival in Somonauk Mr. Lane 
went to work on a farm, working by the 
month for one year. He then rented a farm 
and continued to rent until 1874, when he 
purchased eighty acres on section 24, Shab- 
bona township, located therson, and engaged 
in farming for himself. After residing there 
some four or five years he purchased one 
hundred and fifteen acres adjoining, which 
was fairly well improved, and on which was 
a dwelling house, which he remodeled, and 
into which he moved with his family, and 
has there since continued to reside. In the 
twenty-four years that he has resided upon 
that farm he has shown himself to be a 
model farmer and has been very successful 
in all his undertakings. In addition to gen- 
eral farming he has been somewhat exten- 
sively 'engaged in dairying and has some 
good graded stock. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lane are the parents of 
nine children, seven of whom were born in 
La Salle county and two in De Kalb county, 
Illinois. Henry G. grew to manhood, mar- 
ried and is now engaged in farming in Shab- 
bona township. Edgar A. died in child- 
hood. Maude M. is the wife of Louis Olm- 
stead, a substantial farmer of Shabbona 
township. Ella M. is the wife of J. Clap- 
saddle, of Shabbona. Elmer E. is married 
and engaged in farming in Shabbona town- 
ship. Arthur resides in Iowa. Charles J. 
assists in carrying on the home farm. Os- 



car E. now resides in Wisconsin. Freder- 
ick, a young man, resides at home. 

Mr. Lane is identified with the Repub- 
lican party, with which he has been con- 
nected since becoming a naturalized citizen. 
He has ne\'er sought oilice, but has served 
four years as commissioner of highways, 
and is treasurer of the commission. With 
the exception of school director, that is the 
only office that he has held. He and his 
wife are active members of the Shabbona 
Congregational church, in which he has 
been a deacon for sixteen years. He is also 
a worker and speaker in the Sunday school, 
having a class of young ladies, which he 
has instructed for four years. The first 
years after the building of the railroad, he 
served as superintendent of the schools. 
Fraternally he is an Ancient Odd Fellow, 
having been a member of the order in Eng- 
land. For thirty-nine years he has been a 
resident of Illinois, and while he came to 
this country without means, by his industry 
and econom}', assisted by his good wife, he 
has been fairlv successful in life. 



JOSEPH O. WALRAD, manager of the 
Ellwood farms in Afton township, is a 
native of Otsego county. New York, born 
fanuary 28, 1834, and is the son of Liv- 
ingston and Nancy A. (Ellwood) Walrad, 
who were also natives of Otsego county, 
New York, and the parents of two children, 
Joseph O., our subject, and James, who is 
now deceased. The paternal grandfather. 
Garret M. Walrad, was a soldier in the war 
of 1812. Livingston Walrad, the father, 
came to De Kalb county in 1846, and set- 
tled near the present site of the city of 
Sycamore, where he bought three hundred 
and twenty acres of government land, but 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



after nine years sold out and returned to 
New York. 

When his parents came to De Kalb 
count}', our subject was but twelve years of 
■djxe. His education, began in the public 
schools of New York, was completed in the 
common schools of De Kalb county. In 
1S59 he made the overland journey to Cali- 
fornia, experiencing many hardships in 
going and losing nearly all that he had. 
Soon after his arrival he \\as taken sick and 
for si.x weeks was taken care of by a family 
by the name of Wilson, who did as well by 
him as could be done, making no charges 
whatever for their time and trouble, but 
doing all through kindness and with onlv 
the desire to aid one of their fellowmen. 
Regaining his health, he commenced work 
and prospered exceedingly, clearing in a 
comparati\ely short time some fifteen 
thousand dollars, but lost about seven 
thousand five hundred by loaning to friends. 
Returning to Sycamore in 1884, he engaged 
in farming and in 1887 took charge of the 
Ellvvood stock farm as manager and super- 
intendent. The farm comprises about seven 
hundred and forty-four acres, and is de- 
\oted to stock and grain business, ten men 
being given employment during the entire 
year. 

On the 1st of February, 1865, Mr. Wal- 
rad married Miss Libbie Helmer, a native 
of Herkimer county, New York. They 
have no children, but have an adopted 
daughter, May. Fraternally he is a Mason 
and religiously he is identified with the 
Methodist Episcopal church, with which he 
has been connected since he was sixteen 
years of age. For ten years he has served 
as class leader in the church, and has always 
taken an active interest in church affairs. 
In politics he is a Republican. In addition 



to his regular business he is interested in 
the building and loan association of De 
Kalb, and in Calhoun county, Iowa, he has 
one hundred and forty-five acres of well 
improved land. 



CHARLES W. GARNER, dealer in 
drugs and groceries, is recognized as 
one of the best business men of De Kalb. 
He is a native of the city, born October 16, 
1858, and is the son of John C. and Eliza 
(Rolfej Garner, both of whom were natives 
of England, the former born in 1832 and 
the latter in 1830. They were married in 
the spring of 1855, and their voyage to this 
country the same year was their wedding 
trip. By trade he was a shoemaker, and 
after his location in De Kalb, in 1855, 
worked at it for twenty years in that city. 
He was a superior workman, and his manu- 
facture always gave excellent satisfaction. 
In 1875, he abandoned his trade in a meas- 
ure, and took charge of the shoe department 
in the store of A. Chandler, where he was 
an efficient employee for a number of years. 
Mr. Chandler was succeeded by Tyndali & 
Brown, and in the course of years Brown 
bought out Tyndall's interest, and finally 
C. A. Read bought out Brown. Still Mr. 
Garner continued to fill his wellearned po- 
sition in the store, enjoying the full confi- 
dence of each employer. On May 20, 1886, 
with his son, Charles W., he purchased 
the stock of drugs and groceries of John H. 
Lewis, and under the firm name of Garner & 
Son, continued the business until his death, 
which occurred January 10, 1898. He was 
much respected for his personal merits and 
social worth. For some time he served as 
one of the members of the city council, an 
office which he filled with honor and credit. 



THE BIOCtRAPHICAL RECORD. 



He was a Mason of high standing and 
reached the thirty-second degree. His wife 
survives hiin. They were the parents of 
four children, of whom Lizzie and Emily 
are deceased, while John P. and Charles \\'. 
are still living. 

The subject of this sketch was reared 
and educated in De Ivalb, and when eight- 
een years of age he entered the store of 
John H. Lewis, where he proved himself in- 
dispensible to his employer for many years. 
In 1886, as already stated, in partnership 
with his lather, he purchased the store of 
Mr. Lewis, and on the death of the father 
succeeded alone to the business, which has 
grown to considerable magnitude. In July, 
1895, he was united in marriage with Miss 
Elva Beaupre, a nati\e of De Kalb, born 
January 23, 1871, and a daughter of Charles 
and Sarah Beaupre, of De Kalb. They 
have now one child, Charles \\'icks. Mr. 
Garner has served his native city in the 
office of city treasurer for two years. Fra- 
ternally he is a Mason, and has reached 
the position of Knight Templar, having 
held every office in the various lodges, but 
that of tyler and junior warden. 



JAMES E. HARRINGTON, who is en- 
gaged in the life insurance business, at 
Sycamore, is a native of the city, born Au- 
gust 13, 1866, and is the son of Nelson R. 
and Sarah F. (Waterman) Harrington, the 
former born January 7, 1844, and who fol- 
lowed farming in Sycamore township for 
many years, and then retired to Sycamore. 
He was city marshal of Sycamore for years, 
and served four years in the Civil war, as a 
member of Company F, Thirteenth Regi- 
ment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He was 
a prominent member of the Independent 



Order of Odd Fellows and the Grand Army 
of the Republic. His wife, Sarah Water- 
man, was a daughter of Edward Waterman, 
a native of Kent count}-, England, who 
came to America in 1848, and lived in New 
York for several years and then went to 
Petersburg, Virginia; here his death oc- 
curred when about fifty years old. He 
worked for a large contractor, building 
plank roads in New York and \'irginia. 
He was the son of Edward Waterman, Sr. , 
also a native of Kent county, England, who 
came to the United States in 1848, and died 
in Buffalo, New Yurk, when about eighty 
years old. The paternal grandfather. Dr. 
James Harrington, who married a Miss 
^^'a]rod. was born in New ^■ork in 1806, 
and died in i 892. 

The subject of this sketch, when but a 
year old, was taken by his parents to Sauk 
Center, Minnesota, where he later attended 
school until the age of thirteen years. He 
then spent two \ears in Ann .\rbor, Mich- 
igan, where an uncle, Mark W.. Harrington, 
was professor of astronomy in the University 
of Michigan. One year in the Sycamore 
high school completed his school life. 
From the age of fifteen he has made his 
own way in the world. He clerked first in 
a drug store in Sycamore for twehe years, 
in the meantime taking a course in the Chi- 
cago College of Pharmacy, from which he 
w-as graduated in 1886. For three years 
he was in the employ of Sivwright, Irish 
& Johnson. Since January i, 1898, he has 
been the general agent for the New York 
Life Insurance Compau)-. 

Mr. Harrington was married in Syca- 
more, November 30, 1886, to Miss Nellie 
Walker, born in Virgil township, Kane coun- 
ty, Illinois, and daughter of John N. and 
Hannah (Wilson) Walker, the former a na- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL kECORD. 



live of Hamilton, Canada, born August 13, 
1820, and who came to Illinois, locating in 
\'irgil township, Kane county, in 1S41. 
He was the son of John and Mary (Staun- 
ton) Walker, and was married in Campton 
township, Kane county, July 11, 1S47, to 
Hannah Wilson, born in Dunham, Darling- 
ton county, Canada, and who came with 
her parents to Illinois, in 1843, locating in 
Campton township, I\ane count j'. Her 
father, John Wilson, was born in Pennsyl- 
vania and went to Canada, where he mar- 
ried Mary Pickel, a daughter of John and 
Hannah iSnnthi Pickel. John Wilson was 
the son of James and Deborah (Bennett) 
Wilson, the former a son of James Wilson, 
Sr. , a native of Scotland, who ran away to 
sea, becaine captain of a vessel, and fol- 
lowed the sea for many years. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Harrington three children have been 
born: Jo\ce M., Grace O. and Frank. 

Fraternally Mr. Harrington is a Mason, 
holding membership with the subordinate 
lodge and chapter at Sycamore. He is also 
a member of the Knights of Pythias,. Im- 
proved Order of Red Men, Knights of the 
Globe and Sons of \'eterans. In politics 
he is a Republican, and is now serving as 
alderman from the third ward. He is a 
thoroughly progressive man, and has many 
friends not only in S\camore, but through- 
(lut De Kalb conntv. 



FRANK E. GAMMON resides on section 
8, Malta township, where he is engaged 
in general farming. He was born on sec- 
tion 7, of the same township, July 13, 1867, 
and is the son of John G. and Jane A. (Pien- 
netti Gammon, both natives ot England. 
The former emigrated to this country about 
1848, locating in Buffalo, New York, where 



an uncle and aunt, Henry and Mary Gam- 
mon, then resided. About 1850, his uncle, 
with his family, removed to De Kalb county, 
Illinois, at which time he accompanied them, 
and with whom he lived as a farmer boy, 
until the breaking out of the Civil war, when 
he sh(jwed his patriotism towards his adopted 
country by being enrolled as one of her 
defenders in Company K, Fifteenth Illinois 
Cavalry, under Captain F'ord. He served 
his full term of service, participating in all 
the battles in which his regiment was en- 
gaged during the three years. After being 
honorably discharged, he re-enlisti^d in Han- 
cock's \"eteran Corps, with which he served 
until the close of the war, when he was 
again honorably discharged as corporal. 
On receiving his discharge, James G. Gam- 
mon returned to his native land, where he 
secured his life companion in the person of 
Miss Jane A. Bennett, whom he married 
Ma\'3i, 1866. They became the parents 
of three children, all of whom are j-et liv- 
ing — Frank E., Henry B. and Jessie A. 
The latter married Burton L. Kittle, a grain 
broker in Chicago. Henry B. is a physician 
and surgeon, who after having mastered the 
common and advanced branches in the Cres- 
ton schools, entered Michigan University at 
Ann Arbor, from which institution he was 
graduated. At the present writing (June, 
1898) he is at the front in the Spanish- 
American war and has charge of a hospital 
near Santiago. 

Frank E. Gammon is the eldest of the 
family. He grew to manhood in his native 
township, and was educated in the schools 
of Creston. With the e.xception of a short 
time spent in a machine shop, he has always 
confined himself to agricultural pursuits, 
and has lived on his present farm for twelve 
years. On May 18, 1890, he married Miss 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Clara A. Foster, a native of Waverly, Iowa, 
born December lo, 1869, niid a daughter of 
John and Carrie Foster. By this union 
three children have been born: Neil J., Alta 
M. and Clifford. Mr. Gammon is a mem- 
ber of the Masonic fraternity, holding mem- 
bership with Creston Lodge, No. 320. of 
which he is worshipful master. He is also 
a memberof the Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica, No. 474, and of the Knights of Pythias. 
Politically he is an out and out Republican. 



THOMAS S. DALE is an enterprising 
farmer residing on section 9, Squaw- 
Grove township, where he owns a valuable 
and well improx'ed farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres. He is a native of England, 
born in Durham county July 2, 18 19, and 
is the son of Thomas and Ann (Stoddard) 
Dale, both of whom are natives of the same 
county. In his native land the father grew 
to manhood and was engaged in agricultural 
pursuits. He emigrated t(5 the United States 
in 1852 and settled in Big Rock township; 
Kane county, Illinois, where he purchased 
a farm and spent the remainder of his life. 
In his family were nine sons and six daugh- 
ters, all of whom grew to mature years, 
five now surviving. 

The subject of this sketch grew to man- 
hood in Durham county, and there received 
a fair education. He was reared on a farm 
but spent some of the early years of his life 
in a grocery store, where he received a thor- 
ough business training. He was married in 
Jarrow, England, F"ebruary 10, 1845, to 
Ann McArdle, a native of South Shield, 
Durham county, and a daughter of Thomas 
and Rachell (Dixon) McArdle. In 1852, 
with his wife and two children, he emigrated 
to the United States, taking ship at Liver- 



pool, and being five weeks on the Atlantic. 
They arrived in safety in New York, took a 
steamer at Dunkirk, New York, and came 
by Detroit and Lakes to Chicago, Illinois, 
where he secured employment in Cleaver's 
Soap and Candle Factory, and made his 
home for three years in that citv. In 1S55 
he moved to Kane county, Illinois, and 
purchased eighty acres of land in Big Rock 
township on which he resided some fi\e or 
six years, then sold and in 1862 came to 
De Kalb county, where he purchased one 
hundred and sixty acres of improved land, 
the farm on which he yet ccjiitinues to re- 
side. Man}' of the improvements now upon 
the place are the work of his hands. He 
has tiled the land well and cultivated it 
closely, being very successful in his farming 
operations. He came to the count)' with 
some means and b\' his own labor, enter- 
prise and industry, has accumulated a com- 
petency. His farm is located about two 
and a half miles from Hinckley. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dale are the parents of 
nine children, six of whom are living, as fol- 
lows: James, married and now residing in 
Calhoun county, Iowa, where he is engaged 
in farming; Mar_\', wife of W. R. Owens, of 
Calhoun county, Iowa; \\'illiam, residing at 
home, assisting in carrying on the home 
farm; Ada, also residing at home; Jennie, 
wife of C. W. Owens, residing in Calhoun 
county, Iowa; and Stoddard, who remains at 
home and assists in cultivating the farm. 
The deceased are John, who died when 
about one year old; Thomas, who grew to 
mature 3'ears and died a single man; and 
Anna, who died a young lady. 

Politically Mr. Dale is independent, 
casting his ballot as his conscience dictates 
without regard to part}' ties. For some 
years he served as school director, but 



214 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



would ne\'er accept other office. Both he 
and his wife were reared in the Episcopalian 
faith. A resident of Illinois for forty-six 
years and of De Kalb county for thirty-six 
years, he is well known throughout its 
length and breadth. In the many changes 
that have been made, he has given material 
assistance, and has lived to see the day 
when De Kalb county is ranked among the 
best in the state. He is respected by all 
who know him and is one of the best citi- 
zens of his township and county. 



HOX. FREDERICK B. TO^^■NSEND, 
mayor of the cit}- of Sycamore, is a 
well-known representative of the business 
and financial interests of De Kalb county. 
He is a native of the county, born in the 
township of Malta, July ,:;o, 1858, and is 
the son of .Amos \\'. and I-Ileanor 1 Pierce) 
Townsend, His father, who was the son 
of Stephen and Ann (Denman) To\\nsend, 
was a native of Sullivan county, New York, 
and when nine jears of age came to Illinois 
with his parents, who located in the town- 
ship of Mayfield, De Kalb county. Stephen 
Townsend, the grandfather, was a native of 
Sullivan county. New York, born |une 30, 
1S07. His wife was also a nati\'e of that 
C(junty, born August 15, 1809. Stephen 
Townsend was the son of Joshua and Phrebe 
Townsend, who were likewise natives of 
Sullivan county. New York, and who came 
west in 1839 with their son. Both are 
l)uried in the old cemetery at Mayfield. 
Stephen Townsend, who died some years 
ago, is also buried in that cemetery. His 
wife, .\nn Townsend, is still living at Syca- 
more at the age of eighty-nine years. Thej- 
had ten children, six of whom grew to ma- 
turity. Eleanor, the wife of Luther Jack- 



man, resides in Oregon. Nancy, the wife 
of Orrin ^^■est, living at Plainfield, Iowa. 
Katy B., wife of F. H. Brundage, died at 
Malta, Illinois, in i S96. William H. is liv- 
ing in Sycamore. Hattie E., also living in 
S3'camore. Amos W., who was third in 
order of birth, is the father of our subject. 
Amos W. Townsend grew to manhood 
in Mayfield township and was educated in 
the common schools. He was reared to 
farm life and engaged in stock farming in 
Malta township after his marriage, and there 
continued until 1876, when he engaged in 
the banking business at Sycamore as a 
member of the firm of Daniel Pierce cv: Co., 
in which he continued until his death, Au- 
gust 25, 1887. His wife, Eleanor Town- 
send, is a daughter of Daniel and Jane 
(Brundage) Pierce. She is a native of Sul- 
livan county. New York, and came west 
with her parents, who located at Sycamore 
in 1855. For a number of years her father 
was engaged in the real estate business, but 
upon the failure of D. Hunt & Co. he com- 
menced the banking business in 1866, under 
the firm name of Pierce, Dean & Co. This 
was afterward changed to Pierce & Dean 
and later to Daniel Pierce & Co., the 
present title of the firm. Daniel Pierce is 
still living, but his wife died in 1S76. He 
is now eighty-four years of age and spends 
his summers on a farm of three thousand 
acres in Dickinson county, Iowa, and his 
winters in Sycamore. To Daniel Pierce 
and wife three children were born, one of 
whom died in infancy. They are Eleanor, 
mother of our subject, and Sarah, who was 
the wife of George P. Wild, died in 1896. 
The children of Amos and Eleanor Town- 
send were fi\e in number, as follows: Fred- 
erick B., our subject; Jennie, now the wife 
of Charles A. Webster, of Galesburg, Illi- 




HON. F. B. TOWNSEND. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



217 



nois; Anna, who married F. E. Claj-comb, 
of Sycamore, died in i892;_Georgia, wife of 
John E. Yates, of Round Pond, Maine; and 
Mary, at home. 

The early life of our subject was spent 
in Malta township on the stock farm of his 
father, where he remained until seventeen 
years of age. His primary education was 
obtained in the district schools of Malta 
township, after which he attended the high 
school at Sycamore, and later entered Lom- 
bard University, at Galesburg, which he at- 
tended four years, pursuing the scientific 
course. He then went to Eastman's Busi- 
ness College, at Poughkeepsie, New York, 
and took a full business course. Return- 
ing home he entered the banking house of 
Daniel Pierce & Company, with which he 
has now been connected for seventeen years 
and where he is now the managing partner. 

Mr. Townsend was married February 
18, 1890, at Sycamore, to Mary Boynton, 
a native of Sycamore, and a daughter of 
Charles O. and Lucetta P. (Stark) Boyn- 
ton. She was educated at St. Mary's Sem- 
inary, Knoxville, Illinois. By this union 
two children have been born: Charles B., 
born January r, 1892. and Eleanor, born 
Decembers, 1895. Religiously Mrs. Town- 
send is a member of St. Peter's Episcopal 
church. Sycamore, in which she takes an 
active interest. 

In politics Mr. Townsend is a Democrat, 
the principles of which party were instilled 
into him from his youth. By his fellow 
citizens he has been honored with various 
offices. He was first elected alderman of 
the second ward in 1889, and was annually 
re-elected until 1893. In the spring of 
1894 he was elected mayor to fill the unex- 
pired term of the late Dr. George W. Nes- 
bitt. He was re-elected in 1895, and again 



in 1897, and is now serving his third term. 
In 1 893 he became a member of the bcrard of 
education, in which position he is still serv- 
ing. In 1S92 he was presidential elector for 
Grover Cleveland. Fraternally he is a 
Mason, a member of the blue lodge, chap- 
ter, and Sycamore Commandery, No. 15, 
K. T., at Sycamore, and of Medinah Tem- 
ple, A. A. O. Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, 
Chicago. 

That Mr. Townsend is a very busy man 
is shown by the fact that he has charge of 
some twenty-five farms in De Kalb county, 
which belong to the Daniel Pierce and 
Townsend estates, also some five thousand 
acres in Iowa belonging to the Daniel Pierce 
estate, together with large tracts of land on 
the Red River of the North. The private 
banking house of Daniel Pierce & Co., of 
which Mr. Townsend is now the manager, 
has been doing business for over thirty-one 
years, and has the confidence of the public 
to a high degree. The average deposits are 
about three hundred thousand dollars. 

For his years Mr. Townsend has shown 
remarkable financial and executive ability, 
and the large moneyed and landed interests 
placed in his hands are managed with rare 
skill. His popularity among the people is 
evidenced b}- his being elected for the third 
time as mayor in a Republican city, he be- 
ing a Democrat in politics. He is a man of 
social characteristics, winning in manner, 
and one of the rising young men of De Kalb 
county. 



JOHN H. UPLINGER, dealer in hard- 
ware, general merchandise, and farm- 
ing implements, is one of Kingston's best 
known and most highly respected citizens. 
He has the largest hardware store in the vil- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



lage, and has a large and extensive trade. He 
was born in Butler township, Luzerne 
count)-, Pennsylvania, July 15, 1852, and is 
the son of John and Elizabeth (Wood) 
Uplinger, both of whom were natives of the 
same state. The father for some years en- 
gaged in butchering, but finally gave it up 
for the more quiet but less lucrati\e busi- 
ness uf farming. He came west with his 
family in 1866, locating in Kingston town- 
ship, where he purchased three hundred 
and twenty acres of good improved land, 
besides several other parcels of land, which 
he disposed of from time to time. At the 
time of his death, October 6, 1S93, he was 
the owner of two hundred acres of valuable 
land. His wife's death occurred in July, 
1897. 

Of the family of thirteen children born 
to John and Elizabeth Uplinger, our sub- 
ject was si.xth in order of birth. He was 
fourteen years of age when he came with 
his parents to Kingston, Illinois. His edu- 
cation, begun in the public schools of Penn- 
sylvania, was completed in the schools of 
Kingston. He lived at home with his par- 
ents, assisting in the farm work, until he 
reached his twenty-fourth year, at which 
time he engaged in the hardware business in 
Kingston, opening his place of- business in 
December, 1875. For twenty-three years 
he has continued in that line, and while he 
has been uniformly successful in his busi- 
ness he has yet met with some losses. On 
the 29th of January, 1886, he experienced a 
serious loss by fire, losing nearly all his 
stock, amounting to four thousand dollars. 
In August of the same year he was re-estab- 
lished again, and is now, as formerly, doing 
an extensive business, and having the full 
confidence of the community at large. 

On the 28th of April, 1880, he was 



joined in marriage with Miss M?ry McDole, 
a native of Chemung county, New York, 
born in 1855, and a daughter of John and 
Catherine McDole, who were early settlers 
of De Kalb county. Like his father before 
him, Mr. Uplinger is a stanch Democrat, 
and served two terms as postmaster of 
Kingston under President Cleveland. He 
is a member of the Masonic fraternit)', and 
was raised to the sublime degree of Master 
Mason, September 20, 1877. He is also a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 



JAMES LEISHMAN, dentist. No. 235 
Main street, De Kalb, Illinois. — There 
was a time when the ingenious mechanic 
with steady ner\e, forceps and turnscrew 
could hang out his sign and go to work un- 
challenged. Now things have changed and 
not only must the dentist have nerve and 
muscle, but he must be a man of refinement 
and culture, who by a course of study and 
training has acquired a thorough knowledge 
of dental surgery. No other profession has 
made greater strides to the front than has 
dentistry. Closely connected with the med- 
ical profession, it is not a science to be ac- 
quired simply by study, but its conditions 
are ever changing, and the practice which 
was in vogue in one age is obsolete in the 
next; therefore, experience is a sure and true 
road to higher attainments. We revere the 
learned and experienced physician, but no 
less the cultured and practical dentist. It 
is, therefore, with pleasure that we record 
the biography of James Leishman, one of 
De Kalb's foremost dentists. 

James Leishman was born in South 
Grove township, De Kalb county, Illinois, 
December 22, 1854, and is the son of James 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and Margaret (Brown) Leishman, both of 
whom were natives of Scotland. The father 
was a skilled mechanic, who, while yet a 
3'oung man, came to the United States, and 
shortly after his arrival married Mrs. Mar- 
garet Morton, nee Brown, and by this union 
were born two children, James and David. 
The mother died at the age of seventy-seven 
years, Mr. Leishman surviving her and dy- 
ing at the age of eighty years. They were 
both noble people, honest to a fault, and of 
good repute in the neighborhood where they 
resided. Members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, they took an active interest 
in all church and benevolent work. 

The subject of this sketch was reared 
and educated at Sycamore, where he at- 
tended the high school, and after completing 
his course of^study he turned his attention 
to dentistry, at which time he became a stu- 
dent at Philadelphia, taking a course in den- 
tal surgery. In 1881 he returned to De Kalb 
county and opened an office in the city of 
De Kalb for the practice of his profession, 
and where he has remained to the present 
time. His office is commodious and com- 
fortable and supplied with all the modern 
appliances known to the profession. 

On December 2, 1885, Dr. Leishman 
was joined by marriage with Miss Jessie M 
Carter, a native of De Kalb, Illinois, and a 
daughter of Orlando and Huldah (White) 
Carter, the former a native of Chenango 
county. New York, and the latter also of 
New York. I-3y this union one child has 
been born, Walter Bruce, now attending 
the public schools of De Kalb. 

Dr. Leishman is the carver of his own 
fortune. He is one of that number who 
have risen to a position of eminence in his 
profession by virtue of intrinsic qualities 
that are inherent in his nature and that are 



wbolh- incompatible with failure. Early 
disciplined in the rigid school of self-depend- 
ence, unaided by those extraneous influ- 
ences, which, while they smooth the path- 
way and lighten the responsibilities of youth, 
tend only to weaken the physical and moral 
nature of man, he has pressed on to success 
in his profession. He possesses social qual- 
ities in an eminent degree, with good con- 
versational powers, with a mi.xture of humor, 
which makes him a genial companion, as 
well as a warm-hearted and true friend, e\"er 
ready to greet an acquaintance or entertain 
a visitor. Fraternally he is a Mason and 
also a member of the Modern ^^'oodmen of 
America. In educational matters he has 
always been interested and is now serving 
as a member of the school board 



ORRIN \\. NORTON, who resides on 
section 2, Squaw Grove township, 
where he owns and operates a farm of five 
hundred and forty-five acres, came to Illi- 
nois in 1836 and is therefore justly entitled 
to the name of pioneer. He is a native of 
Ohio, born in Geauga county, November 
27, 1825. His grandfather, Phineas Nor- 
ton, was a native of Scotland, a pioneer of 
\'ermont and a soldier in the Revolutionary 
war. His father, Robert Norton, was a 
native of Vermont, born in 1785, and who, 
as a young man, moved to Geauga county, 
Ohio, where he cleared a tract of land and 
engaged in active farm life. He there mar- 
ried Louisa Monroe, a native of Connecti- 
cut, her father, Joseph Monroe, being a 
pioneer of Ohio. The Monroes are of 
Scotch and English descent. 

In 1836 Robert Norton removed with 
his famil}" to Kane count)-, Illinois, located 
near the village of Big Rock, where he re- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



sided for some years, then came to De 
Kalb county and purchased the farm where 
our subject now resides, where his death 
occurred in 1845, at the age of sixty-two 
years. His wife survived him many years, 
dying in 1878. They were the parents of 
three children, our subject being the eldest. 
Ora T. married Robert Waudby and re- 
sides in Sioux City, Iowa. Mary Jane mar- 
ried David Harmon, of De Kalb county. 

The subject of this sketch came to Illi- 
nois when eleven years of age, his boyhood 
and youth being spent in Kane and De Kalb 
counties. The education he received in the 
pioneer schools was very meager, but he 
has since become a well informed man b}- 
reading and observation. He remained 
with his father till the latter's death and 
then took charge of the farm and business. 
He was married in I\ane county, Illinois, 
December 25, 1853, to Miss Jemima Drake, 
a native ot Allegany county. New York, 
and a daughter of Eda and Hannah Drake, 
who were among the pioneers of Kane 
county. After his marriage Mr. Norton 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres 
which he located with a land warrant. He 
at once commenced the improvement of the 
place, and as his means increased bought 
more land until his farm comprised five 
hundred and forty-five acres. His farm is 
well equipped with all necessary outbuild- 
ings and modern utensils, and on the place 
is a neat and commodious residence. Al- 
though he commenced life with very limited 
means, he has been very successful and 
ranks with the best farmers of his town- 
ship. 

Of the two children born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Norton, Alice died at the age of two 
and a half years. Charles grew to man- 
hood, married Jennie Crosby and has three 



living children, Elmer, Carrie and Edna 
Blanche. He is now engaged in farming 
the old homestead. 

From the organization of the party to 
the present time, Mr. Norton has been an 
ardent Republican, and has given earnest 
support to every presidential nominee of the 
party. Both he and his wife are members 
of the Batavia Christian church, Mrs. Nor- 
ton having been a member for about thirty- 
five years. 

When Mr. Norton came to Illinois, Chi- 
cago was but an insignificant village, and 
he has lived to see it take rank as the sec- 
ond cit\- in the union. The changes that 
have been made in the sixty-two >'ears of 
his residence in Illinois can scarcely be con- 
ceived. An almost unbroken wilderness at 
the time of his arrival, the CQuntry is now 
dotted with flourishing villages, and the 
magnificent farms with their large dwelling 
houses and barns indicate that the people 
are indeed prosperous. The prosperity at- 
tending others has in a measure been meted 
out to him, and he is numbered to-day 
among the leading citizens of Squaw Grove 
township, with many friends throughout 
Kane and De Kalb counties. 



RF. HAMPTON is a native of De Kalb 
county, born in Paw Paw township, 
February 3, 1852, and is the son of Hon. 
Robert Hampton, whose sketch appears 
elsewhere in this work. He now resides 
upon a fine farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres on section 7, Paw Paw township, 
which he owns and operates, in connection 
with another farm of three hundred and 
fifty acres. His boyhood and youth were 
spent upon the old homestead in Paw Paw 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



township, and his primary education was 
obtained in the district schools. From the 
district school he entered the classical semi- 
nar}' at East Paw Paw, in which he took a 
thorough course, and later engaged in teach- 
ing during the winter months, in which oc- 
cupation he continued for some twelve 
terms, while in the summer he assisted in 
the farm work. 

On the 9th of March, 1879, in Chicago, 
Illinois, Mr. Hampton was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Lizzie Dienst, a native of 
Illinois, born in La Salle county, but reared 
and educated in De Kalb county. Her fa- 
ther, Casper Dienst, died when she was a 
small child, and her mother a few months 
later. She was then taken and reared to 
womanhood by Wells W. Fay, of whom 
mention is made elsewhere in this volume. 
By this union there is one son, Robert 
Wells, a bright child of two years. They 
have also taken a child to rear. Golden 
Hampton, who entered their household 
when but four years of age, and is now a 
student in the home school. 

Soon after his marriage Mr. Hampton 
removed to the farm where he now resides, 
which he had purchased a few years before. 
He has here almost continuously since been 
engaged in general farming. In Septem- 
ber, 1894, he purchased a mercantile busi- 
ness at Rollo, in which he was actively en- 
gaged for about three years, closing out in 
August, 1897. In the spring of 1898, in 
connection with his own place, he took 
charge of the greater portion of his lather's 
farm, and in connection with general farm- 
ing he is quite extensively engaged in stock 
raising. For seven years he. has been en- 
gaged in breeeding and raising Polled Dur- 
ham cattle. In his farming operations, Mr. 
Hampton has been uniformly successful, and 



has the reputation of being one of the best 
farmers in the township. 

Politically Mr. Hampton is a Repub- 
lican, with which party he has been inden- 
tifiecl since attaining his majority. He was 
elected and served as commissioner of 
highway's one term, and for ten years has 
been township clerk and school treasurer. 
His interest in the public schools has been 
intensified by his experience as a teacher. 
He and his wife are members of the Rollo 
Congregational church, and in its \\-ork they 
take special delight. Previous to the or- 
ganization of the church at Rollo, he was 
superintendent of the Sunday school at 
East Paw Paw, and is now serving in the 
same position in the church at Rollo, a po- 
sition which he has satisfactorily filled for 
several years. Fraternally he is a Master 
Mason, holding membership with the lodge 
at Paw Paw. Thoroughly progressive, he 
is at all times willing to do all that he can 
to advance the interests of his native county 
and state. Few men are better known in 
the southern portion of De Kalb county, 
and none are more highly respected. 



AR U D O L P H Y O U N G G R E N, of 
Younggren Brothers, resides on section 
S, Shabbona township, where they are en- 
gaged in general farming and stock raising, 
having a farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres in the home place, and another of 
eighty acres in Milan township, both valua- 
ble and well improved farms. They date 
their residence in De Kalb county since 
1854, and on the farm where they now re- 
side since 1861. 

A. Rudolph Younggren is a native of 
Sweden, born in Jonkoping, January 20, 
1852, while his brother, Gustavus M., first 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



saw the light of day on the Atlantic ocean, 
September 5, 1854. Their father, Eman- 
uel Younggren, was also a native of Sweden, 
as was also their mother, Margaretha 
(Sandman) Younggren. The family emi- 
grated to the New World in 1854, taking 
ship at Christina for THiebec, Canada, and 
on arriving at that city they came direct to 
De Kalb county. Illinois, and located first 
in Shabbona Center. Emanuel Younggren 
was a carpenter and joiner by trade, at 
which he worked in his native country for a 
time. For seven years previous to his 
coming to America he worked in a match 
factory at Jonkoping. On comnig to De 
Kalb county, he worked at his trade of car- 
penter and joiner, in addition to looking 
after the home farm. In 1868 he purchased 
one hundred and si.xty acres on section 8, 
Shabbona township, on which he built a 
neat residence and various outbuildings. 
After his naturalization he was elected and 
ser\ed in a number of offices of honor and 
trust. By accident he lost his right hand, 
and was thus compelled to give up carpen- 
tering and much other work. He spent the 
last years of his life on the farm, and there 
died October 6, 1891. His wife survived 
him two years and passed away August 16, 
1893. Their family comprised three sons 
and one daughter. Charles W., the eldest 
born, is engaged in fruit growing, in Oregon. 
A. Rudolph is the subject of this sketch. 
G. M. is the partner of his brother m con- 
ducting the farm and in stock raising. Jen- 
nie and Melvina C. are deceased. 

The Younggren brothers were reared on 
their present farm, which they helped to 
develop, and were educated in the common 
schools. After their father's death they 
succeeded to the homestead, together with 
the eighty-acre farm in Milan township, and 



they are now considered as being among 
the most enterprising and substantial farm- 
ers of Shabbona township. In addition to 
the above described farms, they have re- 
cently purchased one hundred and sixty 
acres of land in Coffey county, Kansas. 
They are also breeders of high-grade Dur- 
ham cattle and Poland China hogs, and 
own and keep for breeding purposes a pure- 
bred French Canadian draft horse. Politic- 
ally the brothers are stanch Republicans, 
and A. Rudolph served two terms as com- 
missioner of highways, and in 1897 was 
elected a member of the county board of 
supervisors, being chairman of the commit- 
tee on printing, and a member of the com- 
mittee of highways, and also of personal 
property. He joined the Odd Fellows lodge 
at Lee, and was a member while that lodge 
was in existence. He passed through all 
the chairs and represented his lodge two 
sessions in the grand lodge of the state. He 
is also a member of the Knights of Pythias, 
Knights of the Globe and Modern Wood- 
men of America, and is now serving as ven- 
erable consul of the Woodmen camp. He 
is well known throughout the county, in 
which he has resided for forty-four years, 
and wherever known he is respected for his 
integrity of character and personal worth. 



GEORGE WILLIAM DUNTON, of the 
firm of Carnes & Dunton, Sycamore, 
Illinois, has won high rank in the legal pro- 
fession and is regarded as one of the best 
attorneys in De Kalb county. He is a na- 
tive of Belvidere, Boone county, Illinois, 
born August 6, J854, and is the son of Will- 
iam S. and Alvira (Baldwin) Dimton. His 
father is a native of Dorset, Bennington 
county, Vermont, born August 31, 1813, 




GEORGE W. DUNTON, 



'HE BIOGR.\PHICAL RECORD, 



223 



and is the son of William B. and Huldah 
(Sykes) Dunton. William B. Dunton was 
also a native of the same state. His father 
was a surveyor and came from Connecticut 
to \'ermont. locating in Bennington county. 
The Duntons were of English ancestry and 
the head of this family came over from 
England during Cromwell's time and settled 
in Boston. 

William S. Dunton, the father of our 
subject, grew to manhood in his native 
state and received a common school educa- 
tion. He came to Illinois in 1846 and lo- 
cated at Belvidere, Boone county, where he 
has since continued to reside. He there 
first engaged in the mercantile business and 
at one time was engaged in the manu- 
facture of plows, and also carried on farm- 
ing. At the time of the organization of the 
national banking system he became a di- 
rector of the First National Bank of Belvi- 
dere, and in 1866 was elected president of 
the same and held that responsible position 
for about twenty years, resigning on account 
of failing eyesight, but accepting the posi- 
tion of vice-president, which place he now 
holds. He has also been a director of the 
Second National Bank of Belvidere since 
its organization about 1884. In politics he 
IS a Republican. Physically he is heavily 
built and of a naturally strong constitution. 
He is a man of even temperament, upright 
disposition and character. His wife was 
the daughter of Da\id Baldwin and was a 
native of Dorset, \'ermont. In religious 
belief she was a Universalist. The)' were 
the parents of four children, as follows: 
Wilbur, who died in childhood; Mary, now 
the wife of Samuel Kerr, an attorney of 
Chicago; Nellie, at home; and George ^^■., 
our subject. William S. Dunton has one 
brother, George B., who lives at Belvidere, 



and two sisters, Adeline, who married David 
Underbill, and Susan, who married Chauncy 
Borland. 

The subject of this sketch was reared in 
Belvidere and after receiving his primary 
education in the public schools of that 
place entered the State University of Iowa, 
at Iowa Citv, in 1871, from which he was 
graduated in the classical course in 1875. 
He then entered the Union Law College of 
Chicago in the fall of 1875 '^"d was gradu- 
ated from that institution in June, 1877. 
Among the lecturers at that time in the col- 
lege were \'. B. Denslow, Harvey B. Hurd, 
judge Lyman Trumbull, Senator J. R. Doo- 
little, James L. High and Judge Booth, to- 
gether with Dr. N. S. Davis as lecturer on 
medical jurisprudence. 

In the fall of 1877 Mr. Dunton com- 
menced practice in Syc.imore, forming a 
partnership with R. L. Devine, who was 
then one of the leading members of the bar 
of De Kalb county. His first few years in 
practice was mostly in preparing cases and 
drawing up pleadings for the causes. Type- 
writers were not then in use, and as Mr. 
Devine was a very busy man with an exten- 
sive practice, this duty devolved upon the 
junior partner. It was, however, a good 
drill, and in after years in practice it has 
been very useful to him. The partnership 
with Mr. Devine was dissolved in 1880, and 
Mr. Dunton continued "alone until the fall of 
18S9, when he formed his present partner- 
ship with Duane J. Carnes. \\'hile in part- 
nership with Mr. Devine they had a large 
general practice, in which they were very 
successful. While alone his practice was 
chieiiy in chancery and business litigation 
and settling up of estates, in which he was 
especially adapted and successful. 

Mr. Dunton was united in marriage 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



August 6, 1885, with Miss Levina S. Den- 
ton, a native of De Kalb county, Illinois, 
and a daughter of Solomon and Olive Den- 
ton, both natives of Dutchess countw New 
York. Her father, who was a farmer by 
occupation, died in 1S64, but her mother 
is yet living. They had a family of se\-en 
children, Rebecca, Julia, Mary, Lavinia S., 
Gilbert H., Elizabeth and George, all of 
whom are living except the latter. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Dunton two children have been 
born, Martha A., born July 2, 188S, and 
Mary O., born March 18, 1892. 

In politics Mr. Dunton is a Republican. 
He has been a member of the board of edu- 
cation, of which he was president for a time. 
In business he has been quite successful. 
He is a stockholder and director in the 
Sycamore National Bank. Mr. Dunton is 
held as a sound student of law and a safe, 
reliable counselor. His special forte is in 
chancery cases and probate, in preparing 
cases for trial, and drawing up pleadings. 
He has been connected with some of the 
most important cases in De Kalb county, 
and with his partner forms one of the 
strongest law firms in the county. He is a 
man of pleasing address and very popular. 



GOTTLIEB F. HUEBER is one of the 
most substantial farmers in De Kalb 
county, and resides' in section 3, Malta 
township. He was born in \^'urtemberg, 
Germany, September 12, 182S, and is the 
son of Jacob and Philopene fColmer) 
Hueber, both natives of Germany, where 
their entire lives were passed, the former 
dying in 1833 and the latter in 1865. They 
were the parents of ten children, of whom 
our subject was fourth in order of birth. 
In his native land,. Gottlieb F. Hueber 



grew to manhood and received a fairly good 
education. The news from the new world, 
which reached the fatherland, was of such a 
nature as to induce him to immigrate, and 
in 1850 he came to this country with Jacob 
Willrett, who has become wealthy and lives 
in De Kalb county, locating first in Penn- 
sylvania, where he remained nearly two 
years. In 1855 he came to Illinois and lo- 
cated in Malta township, De Kalb county, 
where he purchased eighty acres of land in 
its primitive state. This he brought into 
subjection bj' plowing, and beautified it by 
the erection of commodious buildings. To 
the first eighty acres he added another 
eighty, upon which he now resides. Later 
he purchased a quarter-section on section i, 
which was somewhat improved, but which 
he improved still more by applying to it his 
labor and genius. He afterwards pur- 
chased another eighty acres on section 3, 
which was also partially improved, and still 
later bought one hundred and twenty acres, 
which he has since sold to his son Fred- 
erick, who now resides upon it. Lately he 
purchased another eighty acres. 

On the 31st of March, 1858, Mr. Hueber 
was joined in wedlock with Miss Elizabeth 
Heiderscheid, by whom he had twelve chil- 
dren, of whom the following are yet living: 
Elizabeth, Carrie W., John Willliam, Fred- 
erick Jacob, George Emanuel, Laura Mar- 
garet, Gottlieb David and William Nicholas. 
Mrs. Hueber was born in Lu.xemberg, Ger- 
many, February 20, 1829, and died March 
22, 1898. 

Mr. Hueber is a practical farmer in 
every respect. His stock is well cared for 
and of good blood, his buildings of modern 
construction, his fields clean and neat, 
while his fences are strong and secure. He 
has no hobby in his farming, but devotes 




G. F. HUEBER. 




MRS. G. F. HUEBER. 



THE BIOGR.-\PHICAL RECORD. 



229 



himself to a general line. He has been 
very successful in life, and has an abun- 
dance for the old age that is coming upon 
him. Religious]}' he is a member of the 
German Evangelical Association, of which 
his wife was also a member. 



GENERAL EVERELL FLETCHER 
DUTTON. — Prominent among the 
business men of Sycamore is the subject of 
this sketch, who for many years has been 
closely identified with the history of the 
city, while his pame is inseparably con- 
nected with its financial records. The 
banking interests are well represented by 
him, for he is to-day at the head of the 
Sycamore National Bank, the leading 
moneyed institution of this place. He is a 
man of keen discrimination and sound judg- 
ment, and his executive ability and e.xcellent 
management have brought to the concern 
with which he is connected a high degree of 
success. The safe, conservative policy which 
he inaugurated commends itself to the judg- 
ment of all, and the success of the bank is 
certainly due in a large measure to him, and 
through it he has promoted the welfare of 
the city. 

General Button is a native of New- 
Hampshire, born in Sullivan county, Janu- 
ary 4, 1838. His father, Hon. William P. 
Dutton, was a native of Charleston, New 
Hampshire, born August i, 18 17. He mar- 
ried Lucinda J. Blood, also a native of the 
same town and state, born January zS, 
18 1 8. They were married in 1835 and after 
remaining in their native state for nine 
years, where he engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits, they then resolved to come west. Ac- 
cordingly, in 1844, they came to Illinois, 
locating first at St. Charles, Kane county, 



and later removing to Du Page county and 
subsequently settling at Sycamore, De Kalb 
county, where, until 1S57, the elder Dutton 
engaged in the mercantile trade, and was 
also the landlord of the Sycamore House, 
the leading hotel in the city. During the 
administration of President Pierce he held 
the office of postmaster at Sycamore. He 
was reared in the Jackson school of politics, 
and from his earliest manhood was plain 
and outspoken in his political views. The 
doctrines held by the abolitionists were very 
distasteful to him, and during the agitation 
of the freesoil question he went to Kansas 
to vigorously denounce those principles and 
confidently expected to be confirmed in his 
views, and that the report of his investiga- 
tions there would undoubtedly strengthen 
the party, giving prestige to those views. 

Of one thing it could be said of William 
P. Dutton, and that is that he was open to 
conviction. \\'hen he saw with his own 
eyes the terrible and sad condition of the 
people of that distracted country, he exper- 
ienced a complete change of opinion, and 
there openly and unhesitatingly declared 
himself in favor of the free state idea, which 
he had previously so vigorously condemned. 
This course cost him his political position, 
the postofflce at Sycamore. Being then at 
liberty, he at once changed his residence, 
removing to Kansas, settling on a farm in 
Stanton, then Lykens county. Within a 
year after his arri\'al he was elected treas- 
urer of the county, and was later re-elected, 
serving two terms. In 1859 he was chosen 
a member of the constitutional convention, 
which assembled at Wyandotte, and took 
an active part in forming the constitution. 
In i86[, when Kansas was admitted to the 
union, he was elected sheriff of his county, 
the name of which had then been changed 



;30 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



to Miami county. For the better perform- 
ance of his duties he removed to Paola, the 
county seat, which continued to be his home 
until 1873. In 1863, he was re-elected 
sheriff and served his second term. During 
the war he was a conspicuous f:s;ure in Kan- 
sas affairs, and a strong supporter of the 
government, serving on the staff of the gov- 
ernor. In 1873, he returned to Illinois, 
and until 1876 he devoted himself to agri- 
cultural pursuits, when he returned to Pa- 
ola, Kansas, where he resided until his 
death in 1888. His wife died at Sycamore, 
June 15, 1875. Besides our subject the 
children born to William P. and Lucinda 
J. Dutton, were Enmia, who married Aaron 
K. Stiles, of Chicago; and Charles E. , of 
Oakland, California. Everell Fletcher Dut- 
ton was eight years of age when his parents 
settled in Sycamore, and during the eleven 
}-ears preceding his father's removal to 
Kansas, he assisted in the store and post- 
office and attended the public schools, clos- 
ing his studies with a year at Mt. Morris, 
Illinois, and a similar period at Beloit, Wis- 
consin. After the removal of the family to 
Kansas, he assisted his father on the farm 
until 1S58, when he returned to Sxcamore, 
aad served as deputy clerk under the Hon. 
A. K.' Styles, until ApriJ, 1861. 

On the 18th of April, 1861, young Dut- 
ton responded to the call of President Lin- 
coln for troops to aid in the suppression of 
the rebellion, and was mustered into the 
state service at Dixon, Illinois, May 10, and 
into the United States service May 24 
His company was made a part of the Thir 
teenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. Z. B 
Mayo was elected captain of the company, 
which was known as Company F, and Mr 
Dutton was chosen first lieutenant. On the 
1 6th of June the regiment went to Casey- 



ville, Illinois, to look after the se- 
cession element at that place, and, 
July 6, moved on to Rolla, Missouri. 
In .'August, Lieutenant Dutton was promot- 
ed to the command of his company. Cap- 
tain Mayo having resigned. The regiment 
remained at Rolla till the last of October, 
doing, in addition to its regular military serv- 
ice, cavalry duty, looking after guerrillas and 
bushwhackers in and about that section of 
the coimtry. From Rolla they moved by 
forced marches to Springfield, Missouri, 
making the one hundred and twenty miles 
in four days, and were placed in General 
Fremont's command, under whom the reg- 
iment remained until that general was su- 
perseded. 

The Thirteenth was ordered back to 
Rolla, March 6, 1862, and was assigned to 
the connnand of General Curtis. It was 
then sent to Pea Ridge, marching at the 
rate of twenty-five miles per day. During 
this campaign the regiment suffered great 
hardships, being compelled for days to sub- 
sist on parched corn and whortleberries. 
Its campaign down the White River was 
especially hazardous and severe, suffering 
from cold and want of food, and then chang- 
ing to intense heat with no water except 
from the cypress swamps abounding with 
reptiles and filth, many of the wells being 
poisoned as the troops approached. After 
three months experience of this character 
the regiment reached Helena, July 14, with 
half of its number sick. In August, Cap- 
tain Dutton was sent home sick, and while 
there was commissioned major of the One 
Hundred and Fifth Illinois Volunteer Infan- 
try, which was raised in De Kalb and Du 
Page counties. On the 22d of September, 
he was transferred to that command, by or- 
der of the secretary of war, proceeding with 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



it a few days later to Louis\ille, Kentucky, 
where it was assigned to the army under 
General Rosecrans, then in camp near 
Bowling; Green. 

On the iith of November, the brigade 
to which the One Hundred and Fifth was 
attached was ordered to Scotts\ille, Ken- 
tucky, and No\-ember 25th marched to 
Gallatin, Tennessee, where it went into 
winter quarters. On the iith of December 
the regiment was moved to Tunnel Hill 
where it remained till February 1, 1863, 
when it rejoined its brigade at Gallatin, con- 
tinuing there until the close of the spring. 
During these six months of arduous cam- 
paigning, Major Dutton had charge of the 
scouts of the brigade, some two hundred and 
fifty in number, and was almost constantly 
in the saddle. June i, 1863, the regiment 
proceeded to Lavergne, and a month later to 
Murfreesboro. Later it was ordered back to 
Lavergne, and August 19 entered Fort 
Negley, at Nashville, where it remained until 
February, 1864. 

While at Nashville, Major Dutton was 
made a member of the board constituted by 
the war department for the purpose of e.\- 
amining and assigning officers to the regi- 
ments of colored men, remaining on that 
duty till May ist, when he rejoined his 
regiment, which was then assigned to the 
First Brigade, Third Division, Twentieth 
Army Corps, commanded by General Joseph 
Hooker, in wliich it served until the close of 
the war. In the battle of Resaca, the One 
Hundred and Fifth took a distinguished part, 
and for its gallantry was especially compli- 
mented. In the campaign through Georgia 
and the Carolinas, the regiment also won 
the most favorable distinction for its gallan- 
try and achievements, and in the war re- 
ports had favorable njention. From July 13 



to August 4, Major Dutton had command of 
the regiment, Colonel Dustin being absent. 
During this period the battle of Peach Tree 
Creek was fought (July 20), in which the 
One Hundred and Fifth washeavily engaged 
and had the honor of capturing the flag of the 
Twelfth Louisiana Regiment. The brigade 
was then commanded by General Harrison, 
afterwards president of the United States. 
The record of the regiment during the entire 
Atlanta campaign was specially brilliant, 
taking part in the battles of Resaca, Cass- 
ville. New Hope Church, Golgotha, Peach 
Tree Creek and Atlanta. 

Early in August, 1864, Major Dutton 
was promoted to lieutenant colonel, and 
soon afterwards to the colonelcy, his senior 
officer. Col. Dustin, having been appointed 
brigadier general. From x\tlanta the One 
Hundred and Fifth marched with Sherman 
to the sea, and from Savannah throsgh the 
Carolinas to Goldsboro and Raleigh, thence 
through Richmond to Washington, partici- 
pating in the battles of Lawtonville, Smiths 
Farm and Averj'sboro, ihe latter being 
fought March 15, 1865. During this last 
engagement, the One Hundred and Fifth 
drove the enemy from its works and cap- 
tured two twelve-pound guns, which Col. 
Dutton and some of his men turned and 
fired on the retreating enemy. 

For gallantry and meritorious services 
in the campaign in Georgia and the Caroli- 
nas and for distinguished ser\-ices at tha bat- 
tle of Smiths Farm, North Carolina, Col. 
Dutton was breveted brigadier general of 
United States volunteers, with rank from 
March 15, 1865. He was mustered out of 
service at Washington, June 7, 1863, after 
a continuous service of four years and two 
months. Returning to Sycamore, in 1868, 
he was elected clerk of the circuit court 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of Dc Kalb county, in which capacity he 
officiated for eight years In the winter of 
1877, during the session of the thirteenth 
general assetnbly of Illinois, he was elected 
clerk of the house. In 1878, he was 
elected clerk of the northern ,grand di\i- 
sion of the Supreme Court of Illinois, which 
position he held until December i, 1884, 
discharging the duties of the office in such a 
manner as to win the admiration of the 
court and bar. 

In 1883, General Dutton became asso- 
ciated with the Sycamore National Bank, 
purchasing a large proportion of its stock, 
and on the death of J. S. Waterman be- 
came president, a position that he still 
holds. Naturally conservative, by his in- 
fluence he has added strength to the bank 
and secured the confidence of the entire 
community. Few banks have a better rep- 
utation .than the Sycamore National, which 
has always beena successful institution and, 
has gained in popularity under the wise ad- 
ministration of General Dutton and his as- 
sociates. In addition to his banking inter- 
ests, the General has large real est.ite hold- 
ings, and in addition to much farming land 
in De Kalb county, he owns large tracts in 
other northwestern states. Success has 
crowned him in all his. business interests. 

General Dutton was united in marriage 
at Sycamore, Illinois, December 31, 1863, 
with Miss Rosina Adelpha Paine, a native 
of Herkimer county. New York, and a 
daughter of Harmon and Clarinda (\'an 
Horn) Paiue, the former born at German 
Flats, Herkimer county. New York, July 
25, 1822, and the latter at Springfield, New 
York, February 26, 1824. Her parents 
moved to Sycamore, in 1853, and for many 
years her father was proprietor of Paine's 
Hotel at that place. Of late years he has 



been engaged in agricultural pursuits. The 
great-grandfather of Mrs. Dutton, Thomas 
\'an Horn, was a soldier in the Revolution- 
ary war with the rank of lieutenant. By 
reason of this fact Mrs. Dutton has become 
a member of the Daughters of the Revolu- 
tion. To Mr. and Mrs. Dutton two sons 
have been born. George Everell, who was 
born May 8, 1868, graduated at Lombard 
University, Galesburg, Illinois, and is now 
associated with his father in the banking 
business at Sycamore. William Paine was 
born April 25, 1872, and is at present finish- 
ing his education at Harvard University. 

Following in the footsteps of his father, 
and strengthened by the lessons of the Civil 
war, General Dutton has ever been an 
earnest Republican, and has rendered valu- 
able services to his party, which have been 
duly appreciated. Religiously both he and 
his wife affiliate with the Universalist 
church, ill the work of which they take an 
active part. 



JOHN KING, who for more than a third 
of a century has been station agent at 
Cortland, Illinois, is a native of Pemberton, 
Burlington county. New Jersey, born No- 
vember 28, 1834, and is the son of \\'illiam 
and Margaret (Pippit) King, both of whom 
were natives of New Jersey, and were the 
parents of seven children, three of whom 
died in infancy and one, Isaiah, after reach- 
ing maturit}-. He was a Methodist Episco- 
pal minister and was secretary of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal conference in his native 
state. The living are John, Elizabeth and 
Margaret. The paternal grandfather, Will- 
iam King, was a native of England, and 
emigrated to this country when quite young, 
locating in New Jersey. The father was a 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



233 



carpenter by trade, and lived to be over 
eighty years of age. 

The subject of this sketch was reared in 
his native town and county and educated 
in its public schools. He remained under 
the parental roof until twenty-one years of 
age, and then like many others came west 
with a view of bettering his condition in life. 
While yet in the east he learned the carpen- 
ter's trade with his father, and in 1S56 took 
up his residence in Morrison, ^^'hiteside 
county, Illinois, where he worked at his 
trade a few years, and then entered the em- 
ploy of the Chicago & Northwestern Rail- 
way Company as a clerk. In 1864 he took 
the agency at Cortland, Illinois, where he 
has since continued to reside in the faithful 
discharge of his duties for a period of over 
thirty-four years as station and express 
agent. 

In 1866 Mr. King was united in marriage 
with Miss Sarah A. Pierce, a native of Dela- 
ware county. New York, and a daughter of 
Isaac and Eunice (Judd) Pierce. By this 
union there are three children: Millie, Mary 
and Margaret. 

In politics Mr. King is a gold Democrat, 
believing in the principles advocated by the 
old leaders of the party, and that honesty 
in monetary matters should govern as well 
as honesty in other things. He is now 
president of the board of trustees of the vil- 
lage, and treasurer of the school board. He 
has also served as a member of the county 
board of supervisors with credit to himself 
and satisfaction to his constituents. He 
and his family attend the Methodist Episco- 
pal church. In addition to his other prop- 
erty, he is the owner of one hundred and 
thirty acres of land near the village of Cort- 
land, which is under a high state of cultiva- 
tion and which yields an abundant increase 



for the toil and labor expended on it. So- 
cially Mr. King and his family are greatly 
esteemed and highly honored in the com- 
munity which has so long been their home. 



EDWIN HAIT, the present efficient su- 
pervisor of Franklin township, and a 
heavy stock dealer of Kirkland, is a native 
of the township, born December 2, 1853, 
and is the son of Jonas and Emeline (Shat- 
tuck) Hait, both natives of New York state, 
and who were the parents of three children, 
Mary, Edwin and Emma. Desiring to bet- 
ter his condition in life, Jonas Hait came to 
De Kalb county, Illinois, in 1836, and took 
up a claim of three hundred and twenty 
acres, in what is now Franklin and Kingston 
townships, and which he purchased as soon 
as the land came into market. He at once 
set about the improvement of the place, and 
in due time had a good, productive farm. 
He was not, however, long to enjoy the fruits 
of his labor, for he died in 185S, at the age of 
forty-five years. He was a good man and 
well respected in the community, and served 
his township as supervisor for a number of 
years. 

The subject of this sketch was born on 
the farm which his father located in 1S36, 
and there grew to manhood, and has spent 
his entire life in farming and stock dealing. 
His education was obtained in the district 
schools, and the knowledge therein obtained 
has been supplemented by reading and con- 
tact with the world. On the 29th of De- 
cember, 1875, he was united in marriage 
with Miss Ida J. Rote, also a native of 
Franklin township, and a daughter of Hixon 
Rote, a native of Pennsylvania and a pio- 
ner of DeKalb county. By this union three 



234 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



children were born, two of whom died in 
infancy. The living one is Morris. 

In politics Mr. Hait is a Republican, and 
has voted the party ticket since attaining 
his majority. He has ever taken an active 
interest in political affairs, and has been for 
some years one of the leaders of the party 
in Franklin township. He is at present a 
member of the village board of Kirkland, as 
well as supervisor of the township. For a 
number of jears he has ser\ed as school 
director in the old Lacy district, and has 
freely given of his time to advance the in- 
terests of the public schools. He has one 
hundred and sixty acres of fine land, which 
was the old Hait homestead. For some 
years he has been engaged in stock-dealing, 
buying and shipping to the eastern markets, 
and has built up a good trade. A very pop- 
ular man, he has many friends throughout 
the county. 



WILLIAM W. WYLDE is a substantial 
farmer residing in the village of Genoa. 
He is a native of Somersetshire, England, 
born February 28, 1841, and is the son of 
William and Maria (Webb) Wylde, both of 
whom were natives of the same country. 
They emigrated to the United States in the 
fall of 1843, and came directly west, locat- 
ing in Spring township, Boone county, Illi- 
nois, where they resided eight years. They 
then moved into the city of Belvidere, where 
the father died at the age of forty-four years. 
He was the son of John Wylde, who came 
to America with him and who survived him 
two years, dying in 1857, when about eighty- 
one years of age. After the death of her 
husband Mrs. Maria Wylde was again united 
in marriage, her second union being with 
George Harding. She is still living in Bel- 



videre, at the age of eighty-one years. She 
does all her own house work, including 
washing, ironing and baking, and each Sun- 
day she walks one mile to church. 

The subject of this sketch had limited 
school privileges, and at the age of twelve 
years assumed his own support. He worked 
as a farm hand until twenty-one years of 
age, having been placed with a man who 
promised to care for him the nine years un- 
til he attained his majority and give him in 
the end three hundred and fifty dollars. The 
man failed, and he got nothing for all his 
years of labor. At the age of twenty-one 
he commenced life anew and worked by the 
month for two years, saved his money and 
purchased a farm of one hundred acres near 
Genoa, on which he lived until removing to 
the village in 1891. He was always eco- 
nomical and a good manager, and in due time 
had saved enough to buy another farm of 
one hundred and sixty acres lying some forty 
rods from his first farm. He now rents ^le 
larger farm, but personally attends to the 
cultivation of the smaller one. For some 
time he has been engaged in dairy farming, 
keeping from thirty to thirty-tive head of 
milch cows. On his two farms he has made 
many improvements, built a dwelling on 
each, together with two barns, and has also 
drained them with thirty thousand feet of 
tile. Frequently he has planted orchards, but 
has never met with succes.i in the raising of 
fruit. 

Mr. Wylde has been twice married, his 
first union being with Miss Martha Thomp- 
son, a native of McHenry county, Illinois, 
who died in 1892, at the age of forty-two 
years. On the 2nd of Januar\', 1896, he 
married Mrs. Cornelia Bunnell, wido.v of 
Sherman Bunnell, by whom she had one 
daughter. Hazel Blanche. Mrs. Wylde was 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



235 



born in Genoa township, and is a daughter 
of David and Mary fBabcock) Davis, the 
latter being a daughter of WiUiani H. and 
Cornelia (Hogeboom) Babcock. William 
Babcock was the son of Abram and Susan 
(Lee) Babcock, the latter being a relati\-e 
of General Robert E. Lee. Cornelia Hoge- 
boom was the daughter of .Andrew and Julia 
(Distant) Hogeboom, who were among the 
first settlers of Hampshire township, Ivane 
county, Illinois. David Davis was the son 
of Alfred C. Davis. By trade he was a car- 
penter and builder, and died in 18S0, at the 
age of forty years. To our subject and 
wife a son has been born, Donovan Oscar. 
In the spring of 1898, Mr. Wylde began 
the erection of one of the largest and finest 
residences in Genoa. It is of pleasing ar- 
chitecture, well arranged, light and airy, 
and has eleven large rooms. In politics 
Mr. Wylde is a Republican, and has served 
as supervisor of his township and in minor 
township ofiices. He is a spiritualist in 
belief, being a medium -and having the un- 
known power to heal, a power which he 
cannot e.xplain, but merel) knows it exists. 



JOHN GREEN, one of De Kalb county's 
representative and thriving fartners, 
owns and operates a farm of three hundred 
and twenty acres, located on sections 4 and 
5, Shabbona township. He was born March 
30, 1857, in Monroe county. New York, and 
is the son of Peter and Catherine (Kies) 
Green, whose family comprised three chil- 
dren: William E. , John and Elizabeth. 

Moved by a desire to better his condi- 
tion, and learning the prospects held out in 
the west, where the same effort as was ex- 
erted in Monroe county. New York, would 
shortly result in ownership of choice land in 



Illinois, Peter Green brought his family to 
De Kalb county, Illinois, in 1864, and pur- 
chased one hundred and sixty acres of par- 
tially improved land. He immediately set ■ 
about further improving his property by the 
erection of buildings, setting out orchards 
and shade trees, tiling the land, and con- 
tinued to cultivate the place until 1881, 
when he moved to the village of Shabbona, 
and lived a retired life until his death, July 
21, 1S90, leaving a widow, who survived 
him several years and who died December 
21, 1896. 

John Green came west with his parents 
to De Kalb count}', Illinois, in the spring 
of 1864, and has since been identified with 
its growth and prosperity. He was but 
seven years of age on his arrival here and 
grew to manhood in the old homestead, and 
received his education in the district school 
in the neighborhood. After his school days 
were over he took up the pursuit of farm- 
ing, working with and aiding his father in 
the many duties and responsibilities their 
avocation exacted. 

Mr. Green was married September 13, 
1 88 1, to Miss Catherine Erbes, daughter of 
George Erbes, a prominent and highly re- 
spected farmer living a few miles west of 
the town of Lee, Lee county, Illinois. By 
this union they became the parents of a 
happy family of five bright children, all of 
whom are attending school in the neigh- 
borhood. 

Mr. Green has always been identified 
with the Republican party, advocating its 
principles, and voting the party ticket, na- 
tional, state and county. He has never held 
nor sought of^c«, his private affairs and re- 
sponsibilities being of such nature as to 
claim his whole attention. In educational 
affairs the growth and development of the 



236 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



public school system have always received 
his sympathy and support, and his efforts 
in this direction take form in the discharge 
of the duties of school director, an office 
which he now holds. 

Since coming to De Kalb county, a boy 
of seven years, Mr. Green has witnessed 
the progress of events which year by year 
have taken place, resulting in a complete 
transformation. Where existed the raw 
prairies are now the fertile fields; the rude 
cabin has given way to homes of statelier 
aspect and proportions, and wild nature ex- 
hibits in every detail the civilizing influences 
which individual effort and industry have 
resulled in making the state of Illinois fore- 
most among the agricultural states of the 
Union. A combination of effort has ef- 
fected these changes, and like other enter- 
prising and industrious men, John Green 
has contributed his full share. He has but 
lately added by purchase one hundred and 
sixty acres of the old homestead, and his 
interests consist of three hundred and 
twenty acres of De Kalb county's most fer- 
tile land. He is one of the county's popu- 
lar and esteemed citizens, his integrit)-, in- 
dustry and well regulated habits inviting 
and fostering the respect and confidence of 
those who know him. , 



ABRAM ELLWOOD was for some 
years one of Sycamore's best known 
citizens, one whose life record is a com- 
mendable one. Only those lives are worth 
recording that have been potential factors 
in the public progress, in promoting the 
general welfare, or advancing the educa- 
tional or moral interests of the community. 
Abram Ellwood was ever faithful to his 
duties of citizenship, and by the successful 



conduct of his business interests not only 
promoted his individual success, but also 
promoted the general prosperity. In his 
life's span of forty-seven years, he accomp- 
lished much and left behind an honorable 
record worthy of perpetuation. He was a 
man of the highest respectability, and those 
who were most intimately associated with 
him speak in unqualified terms of his 
sterling integrity, his honor in business 
affairs and his fidelity to all the duties of 
public and private life. 

Mr. Ellwood was born in Scotia, 
Schenectady county, New York, March 26, 
1850, and was the son of Reuben and 
Eleanor (Vedder) Ellwood, the former a 
native of Minden, Montgomery county. 
New York, and the latter of Schenectady. 
Reuben EUwopd, the father, was for years 
one of the leading manufacturers of De 
Kalb county, was well known throughout 
the state and nation, and for two terms 
served his district as a member of the United 
States house of representatives. His death 
occurred July i, 1885, while his wife sur- 
vived him about ten years. 

In the public schools of Sycamore 
Abram Ellwood received his primary educa- 
tion. He then attended a militar}' college 
at Poughkeepsie, New York, where he re- 
mained until the age of sixteen years, when 
he began life for himself, at once display- 
ing that energy, independence and self- 
reliance that burned out the fires of his 
life many years before his tmie. Being a 
sturd)- }'onth, he secures a position as brake- 
man on the railroad, and was thus employed 
two years, then went south and assumed a 
more responsible position, that of con- 
tractor on the New Orleans, Mobile and 
Texas Railroad, afterward serving as pas- 
senser conductor on this line. Notwith- 




'^Bb^ 



ABRAM ELLWOOD. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



239 



standing that he was but eighteen years old, 
he displayed executive ability far beyond 
his years. He was next on the Mihvauiiee 
& Northern Railroad as constructor, with 
headquarters at Green Bay, Wisconsin. 
Later he was United States mail agent, on 
the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railroad, 
from which he was transferred to the Chi- 
cago & Northwestern Railway, between 
Chicago and Cedar Rapids. His last run in 
the mail service was between Chicago and 
Cincinnati. 

On the 3d of January, 1S76, Mr. Eliwood 
was united in marriage at Manchester, New 
Hampshire, with Miss Emma L. Gar\in, a 
native of Chichester, New Hampshire, and 
a daughter of Jesse and Eunice (Leavitt) 
Garvin, the former a native of Garvin Falls, 
New Hampshire, and the latter of Chiches- 
ter, in the same state, and the daughter of 
Jonathan Leavitt. To this union there 
were five children, four of whom are now 
living, — iS'Iildred G., Sallie E., E. Eleanor 
and A. Leonard. Reuben, Jr., died at the 
age of three and a half years. 

In the fall of 1S77, our subject became 
associated with his father in the manufact- 
uring business in Sycamore, under the firm 
name of the R. Eliwood Manufacturing 
Company. This connection was continued 
until the fall of 1S80, when he engaged in 
the manufacture of wire fence stretchers, 
which he successfully conducted for four 
years. In December, 1884, that business 
was consolidated with the R. Eliwood Man- 
ufacturing Company, and he was made 
manager for the entire business. After the 
death of the father he purchased the entire 
stock and plant and continued the business 
under the firm name of the Abram Eliwood 
Company. He perfected many of the ma- 
chines in his plant, and succeeded in build- 



ing up a very extensive trade, and employed 
a large number of men. His success at- 
tracted the attention of the citizens of other 
places, and he was offered a bonus of thirty- 
five thousand dollars if he would remove the 
plant to De Kalb. This offer he accepted, 
and in 1892 removed to De Kalb, looking 
after the erection of buildings from his own 
plans, which made one of the most com- 
plete manufacturing coni:erns in the country. 
In the fall of 1896 Mr. Eliwood formed 
a stock compan}', in order that he might 
relieve himself of much of the hard work 
that was gradually breaking him down. He 
was a man of wonderful energy, who did 
honestly everything that he undertook, and 
the excessive mental strain required in the 
prosecution of his business hastened, if not 
entirely induced, his death. A short time 
prior to his death, he took up quarters at 
the sanitarium, Battle Creek, Michigan, but 
it was of no avail, the disease being too far 
advanced. He died November 11, 1S97, 
while yet in the prime of life and usefulness, 
a martyr to self-imposed duty. From a 
small beginning he had developed the busi- 
ness to one of large proportions, employing 
from seventy-five to one hundred men, to 
whom he ever showed the greatest kindness 
and consideration. Politically he was a 
Republican, but never a partisan. Because 
of his business ability, rather than his pol- , 
itical training, he was called upon to serve 
as alderman of the city, and also as its 
mayor, serving in the latter position from 
1889 to 1891. A friend of education, he 
served for some years as a member of the 
school board to the entire satisfaction of 
the people. Before his death he became a 
communicant of the Congregational church, 
and was faithful to the last, dying in the 
full assurance of faith and in the hope 



240 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of a resurrection and a reunion of loved ones 
beyond the gjrave. Mrs. Eilwood and her 
two oldest children are also members of the 
same church. Fraternally, Mr. Eilwood 
was a Mason of high standing. 



SAMUEL PETERSON, contractor and 
builder, residing in De Kalb, is a na- 
tive of Sweden, born in 1855, and is the 
son of John and Mary Peterson, both na- 
tives of the same country, who emigrated 
to the United States in 1S69, locating in 
De Kalb township, De Kalb county, Illi- 
nois, where some of their relatives had 
previously located. John Peterson was a 
cooper by trade, and followed that occupa- 
tion during his entire residence in De Kalb. 
His death occurred in 1892, his wife pre- 
ceding him to their hea\enly home some 
twenty-one years, dying in 1871. Their 
family consisted of eight children, five of 
whom are yet living. 

Samuel Peterson, our subject, was four- 
teen years of age when he came with his 
parents to this country. For about five 
years after his arrival he worked on various 
farms. His father and a brother being 
mechanics, he associated himself with them 
and soon learned the carpenter's trade, 
which lie has followed continuously to the 
present time. He is a first-class workman, 
and has done much of the best work in De 
Kalb for the past twenty years. He keeps 
under his supervision twenty men, repre- 
senting the various trades employed in the 
construction and completion of dwellings. 
In 1896 he erected thirty-one houses in De 
Kalb, a greater number than was ever built 
by one man in any previous }-ear. 

In 18S3 Mr. Peterson married Miss 
Christine Peterson, a native of Sweden, 



born July 7, 1862, and the daughter of 
John Peterson, also a native of Sweden, 
who removed to this country about 1869. 
By this union six children were born: Edna 
G., August I, 1884; Roy M., October 7, 
1886; Earl R., October 10, 1889; Irving, 
August 4, 1891; Ruth L., July 19, 1894; 
and Anna M., September 16, 1897. 

By his industry and gentlemanly de- 
portment, Mr. Peterson has endeared him- 
self to the people of De Kalb and built for 
himself not only an extensive business, but 
a name that will last. He has been fortu- 
nate in his business ventures and is the 
owner of a number of lots in the city, on 
which he has built neat and comfortable 
residences, and has now thirty-one buildings 
under his care, witli a monthly revenue 
from this source of over three hundred 
dollars. The estimation in which he is 
held by the people is shown by his elec- 
tion as alderman for the fourth year, an 
office he fills with credit to himself and 
honor to those whom he represents. Like 
every clear-headed man, who looks into the 
future and plans for emergencies which 
cannot be averted, he has for several years 
carried for himself and wife heavy insur- 
ance policies. He is a member of the Swe- 
dish Lutheran church, of which bod}- his 
wife is also a member. 



EDWARD B. POWERS, a leading and 
influential farmer, residing on section 
33, Paw Paw township, owns and cultivates 
a farm of two hundred acres in the home 
place, and one hundred and sixty in another 
farm. He was born in La Salle county, 
Illinois, September 16, 1841. His father, 
Norman H. Powers, and his grandfather 
Powers were natives of Vermont. The 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



latter was a hunter of repute, with a family 
of seventeen children. He remo\ed from 
Vermont with his family, to New York, in 
an early day, and there Norman Powers 
grew to manhood. Early in the thirties, 
when a young man, he went west, and set- 
tled in La Salle county, Illinois, and later 
returned east, and in Canada married 
Catherine Hart, a nati\e of Scotland, and 
a daughter of James Hart, also a native of 
Scotland, who was for many years a veteri- 
nary surgeon in the English army, and who 
settled in Canada after leaving the service. 
Immediately after his marriage, Norman 
Powers returned with his bride to La Salle 
county and located in what is now Earl 
township, where he improved a farm, which 
he later sold, and purchased the place where 
his son now resides. He entered this land 
with a soldier's warrant, and it comprised 
one hundred and sixty acres in its native 
state. There was not a house in sight when 
he purchased the place. He bought an old 
frame house, which he mo\"ed on the tract, 
and there resided while erecting a more 
comfortable residence. All the lumber used 
in the house, he hauled from Chicago. 
As soon as located, he at once commenced 
the improvement of the farm, the first \ear 
putting in a crop of five acres of corn. At 
that time wild game, geese, ducks and 
prairie chickens, were in abundance, and 
they ate up almost the entire crop. In the 
spring of 1852, he started with an ox team, 
in company with four men, for California, 
making the overland trip, and spent about 
two years in getting out ship timbers; while 
there he was fairly successful, but was glad 
to return to his Illinois farm. He returned 
by way of the Isthmus of Panaina, to New 
York, and from there by rail to his home. 
After his return he was elected super\'isor 



of his township, and held several other mi- 
nor official positions. In 1861, he enlisted 
in Company I, Fourth Illinois Cavalry, and 
with his regiment w^ent to the front. At 
the battle of Pittsburg Landing he was 
wounded by a piece of shell, and perma- 
nently disabled. He was therefore dis- 
charged, returned home, and later gave up 
the farm and removed to Earlville, Illinois, 
where he resided some three or four years, 
then went to Scranton, Iowa, and died at 
the residence of a daughter, June 7, 1S82. 
His wife survived him a number of _\ears 
and passed away April 6, 1896. They were 
the parents of two sons and three daughters, 
Edward B., our subject being the first born. 
Christie is the wife of Hon. H. M. Board- 
man, whose sketch appears elsowhere in 
this work. _ Susan A. is the wife of J. E. 
Moss, of Scranton, low^a. Elizabeth died 
in .\pril, 1861, at the age of twelve years. 
Horace E. is a lawyer by profession and is 
engaged in practice at Scranton, Iowa. 

Edward B. Powers grew to manhood on 
the home farm, where he received very 
limited educational advantages. After his 
father was discharged and returned home 
from the army, he enlisted, August 15, 1862, 
joining his father's old company and regi- 
ment. His father returned home on Sat- 
urday night, and on the following Tuesday 
he enlisted and joined the regiment at Tren- 
ton, Tennessee. With his regiment he en- 
gaged in scouting duty, and in the fall of 
1862, at Chestnut Bluffs, Tennessee, he was 
taken prisoner by the enemy and held for 
about eighteen hours, when he was paroled 
and returned to his regiment. After his ex- 
change, he served until the close of the war, 
and was discharged at Springfield, Illinois, 
in July, 1S65. When he enlisted he left the 
harvest field with the wheat uncut and the 



242 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



reaper in the Held, where it remained until 
the next spring, when it was pulled out in 
order to plant a new crop. The war senti- 
ment in his neighborhood at that time was 
very strong, and nearly every able-bodied 
mad enlisted. 

After his discharge, Mr. Powers returned 
home and worked for various farmers until 
the fall of 1867, when he purchased a farm 
of one hundred and sixty acres, on section 
j8. Paw Paw township, a partially improved 
place. On the first of December, 1867, in 
De Kalb county, he married Miss Nancy A. 
Weddell, born in Paw Paw township, and a 
daughter of W. B. Weddell, one of the 
early settlers of the county. By this union 
there were three children. Katie C. grew 
to mature years and died single at the age 
of twenty-one years. Agnes G. also grew 
to womanhood, and died when nineteen 
years old. Beth A. is a student of the home 
schools. 

After their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Pow- 
ers began their domestic life on a farm, 
which he purchased but a short time pre- 
vious, and there resided for eight years, 
and then returned to the old home farm. 
Since removing to the old homestead he 
has made many improvements on the two 
farms, including over seventeen miles of 
tiling. In addition to general farming he 
has been engaged in breeding and dealing 
in Shorthorn cattle, and annually feeds and 
ships several car loads of cattle and hogs. 
Politically Mr. Powers is a Republican, 
and cast his first presidential ballot for U. 
S. Grant in 1868. He has ever taken an 
active interest in local politics, and has 
served two years as assessor of his township, 
and for twenty years has been school trustee 
and director, and clerk of his school district 
for the same length of time. He and his 



wife are members of the Congregational 
church at Rolla, and are highly esteemed 
for their real ^\•orth. Fraternally he is a 
member of the Grand Army of the Repub- 
lic. A life-long resident of La Salle and 
De Kalb counties, he has witnessed their 
growth and development, and has worked 
with others for the accomplishment of the 
general good of his county and country. 



ALBERT S. KINSLOE, the present 
efficient county clerk of De Kalb 
county, Illinois, is a veteran of the war for 
the union, with a record of nearly four years 
of faithful service. He was born in Hunting- 
don county, Pennsylvania, in December, 
1840, and is the son of Dr. Lemuel and Isa- 
bella (Thompson) Kinsloe. His father was 
a native of Pennsylvania, born in 1808, 
and was a son of James Kinsloe, who was a 
native of Scotland- Dr. Kinsloe was a 
practicing physician, and came west in the 
spring of 1854, locating at Ross' Grove, De 
Kalb county. He died in 1870. In politics 
he was a Republican, and religiously a mem- 
ber of the Associate Reformed (Presbyterian) 
church. He was a man of medium height, 
mild disposition, firm in character and strict 
in his religious views. His wife was born 
at Spruce Creek, Pennsylvania, and was of 
Irish ancestry. She was a member of the 
same church as her husband. Her death 
occurred in 1872. They were the parents 
of four children — Albert S., our subject; 
Allen G., deceased; Clara T., deceased; 
and Harris E., residing at Corsicanna, 
Texas. 

The subject of this sketch resided in 
Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, until 
about five years of age when his parents 
removed to Juniata county, in the same 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



243 



state. On the removal of his parents to 
De Kalb county, Illinois, he accompanied 
them and was educated in the public schools, 
finishing his school life in the academy at 
East Paw Paw, Illinois. He was li\ing 
with his parents at Earlville, Illinois, and 
engaged in clerking, at the commencement 
of the Civil war and enlisted April 26, 
1 86 1, as a member of Company D, Twenty- 
third Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He was 
mustered into the service at Chicago, and 
with his regiment in June following went to 
Ouincy, Illinois, thence to Jefferson Bar- 
racks, near St. Louis, Missouri, and later to 
Jefferson City, in the same state. The next 
move was to Lexington, Missouri, where 
the regiment was captured by General 
Price. Being sick at the time, Mr. Kinsloe 
was not taken prisoner. The regiment was 
released on parole and was sent to Benton 
Barracks, Missouri, where it was discharged 
by order of General Fremont October 8, 
1861. 

On being discharged Mr. Kinsloe re- 
turned to Earlville and on November 26, 
I S61, re-enlisted in Company D, Fifty-third 
Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, which 
was recruited at Earlville, and of which he 
was elected and commissioned second 
lieutenant. The regiment first went into 
camp at Ottawa, Illinois, and from there it 
was sent to Camp Douglas, near Chicago, 
where it remained until early in the spring 
of 1862, when it was sent to Cairo and from 
there to Savannah, Tennessee. From 
Savannah they moved to Pittsburg Landing, 
reaching there the second day of the battle. 
From Pittsburg Landing they marched to 
Corinth and from there to Memphis, where 
the regiment was engaged in maneuvering 
about that section, and doing scout duty for 
some time. On the way to Memphis they 



stopped at Grand Junction, Tennessee, 
Holly Springs, La Grange, Moscow and 
Germantown, arriving at Memphis in July, 
1862. 

On the sixth of September, 1862, the 
regiment left Memphis and marched to Bol- 
ivar. October 5th, 1862, they were en- 
gaged in fighting Price between Bolivar and 
Corinth, and were with Grant on his march 
down through Mississippi to Oxford, that 
state, and after the surrender at Holly 
Springs they fell back with Grant's army 
and went to Memphis. Later they went 
down the river to Young's Point, opposite 
\'icksburg, then up the Yazoo to Snyder's 
Bluff, from where they marched to a posi- 
tion on the left of the lines in rear of 
Vicksburg, and were there engaged until the 
surrender, July 4, 1863. Our subject next 
took part in following General Johnston, 
and participated in the fight at Jackson, 
July 12, 1863. After this, his command re- 
turned to Vicksburg and from there went to 
Natchez, but again returned to Vicksburg 
when it entered on and took part in the 
Meridian campaign. 

Subsequently returning to Vicksburg, 
the regiment veteranized, and the men were 
granted furloughs to visit their homes. At 
the expiration of the furlough the regiment 
re-united at St. Louis and there took trans- 
ports for Clifton, Tennessee, from there 
they marched across the country by way of 
Huntsville, Georgia, striking the Georgia 
Central Railroad at Kingston. Their next 
march was south to Allatoona, where they 
halted until the army moving on Atlanta 
crossed the Chatahoochie river. Lieutenant 
Kinsloe took part in all the battles in which 
his regiment was engaged until the fall of 
.Atlanta. His regiment was on the left 
where the brave McPherson fell. 



244 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



After the fall of Atlanta, Lieutenant 
Kinsloe was detailed on the staff of General 
Potts, as acting assistant adjutant-general. 
First Brigade, Fourth Division, Seventeenth 
Army Corps, in which capacity he served 
until he was mustered out March 31, 1865. 
Enlisting as a private, he was promoted to 
second lieutenant, to take rank from January 
I, 1862; to first lieutenant, to take rank 
from August 6, 1863, and to captain, Janu- 
ary 31, 1S65. Returning to his home in 
Earlville, Captain Kinsloe engaged in the 
grocery business for a time, then went to 
Neponset, Bureau county, Illinois, and re- 
mained there until the fall of 186S, when 
he removed to Malta, Illinois, where he 
lived until 1892, when he took up his resi- 
dence in Sycamore. When he went to Malta, 
Captain Kinsloe went into the produce busi- 
ness, and was also agent of the American 
Express Company. In 1873 he was ap- 
pointed postmaster at Malta, which position 
he held for thirteen years. While residing 
there he was a member of the board of 
education for t\\-elve years, a part of which 
time he was president of the board. In 
1886, he was elected county treasurer, and 
served the full term of four years. In 1S90, 
he was elected county clerk, and re-elected 
in 1894, and at this writing has received the 
nomination for the third time. 

Mr. Kinsloe was united in marriage De- 
cember 29, 1865, to Miss Caroline W'. Cook, 
daughter of Nelson and Lucretia (I\'es) 
Cook, both of whom were natives of Con- 
necticut, where she was also born. Their 
children were George H., Lola, Lucretia, 
Deles, Caroline, Friend M., Artie, Eliza, 
Adelbert and Lyman, all of whom are yet 
living. To Mr. and Mrs. Kinsloe one child 
was born, Nora B., now the wife of C. P. 
Underwood, living at Danberrs', Nebraska. 



They are the parents of the following chil- 
dren; Homer, Carrie, Hazel, Edna, Ruth 
and Nancy. Of the number Carrie is de- 
ceased. 

Religiously Mrs. Kinsloe is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. Politically 
Captain Kinsloe is a Republican, and frater- 
nally is a member of the Masons, Knights of 
Pythias, Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and the Grand Army of the Republic. He 
has served several terms as commander of 
his post. He has ever taken an active part 
in political matters, and lias served fre- 
quently as delegate to the various conven- 
tions of his party, and in June, 1898, was a 
delegate to the state convention. He has 
ever been and is now one of the most popu- 
lar officials in De Kalb county. At the 
county convention in 1894, and also in 1898, 
he received the nomination by acclamation. 
He is always at his post of duty, accommo- 
dating to all, and efficient in the discharge 
of his responsible duties. He is a man of 
warm heart, sympathetic and popular with 
all who know him. 



HENRY N. PERKINS, who is living a 
retired life in Genoa, is a well-known 
citizen of the place and of De Kalb county. 
He was born in Columbia count)', New 
York, August 12, 1833. His father, Hora- 
tio N. Perkins, was born in Grotton, Con- 
necticut, November 13, 1808, and re- 
moved to Columbia county, New York, 
where he married Eliza ^^'allace, a native of 
that county and a daughter of William and 
Betsy (Stacey) Wallace, her father being a 
soldier in the war of 181 2. Her mother 
spent the last years of her life in Genoa, 
with her daughter, and died at the age of 
si.xty-seven years. 



THE BIOCxRAPHICAL RECORD. 



H5 



In 1837, Horatio N. Perkins moved with 
his family to De Kalb county, lUinois, and 
located in Genoa, where our subject was 
reared. When he came to Genoa he had 
the foresight to secure a large amount of 
land which he believed would some day be 
very valuable. At the time of his death he 
had nearly five hundred acres of as fine land 
as any in the township, lea\-ing an estate to 
the amount of more than fifty thousand 
dollars. He died in 1888, at the age of 
seventy-nine years. In 1843, he built the 
Pacific Hotel in Genoa, which has been in 
existence from that time to the present. He 
continued to operate the hotel until 1S54, 
when he retired to his farm, where he re- 
mained until about 1S72, when he returned 
to Genoa, and there resided during the re- 
mainder of his life. He was the son of 
James Perkins, a farmer who lived ami died 
in New York state, his death occurring at 
the age of ninety-three years. 

Henry N. Perkins was but four years of 
age when he came with his parents to Ge- 
noa. His education was obtained in the 
old log schoolhouse, near the present site 
of the village, with the addition of two 
terms at Mt. Morris Academy. He remained 
with his father until the age of twenty-two 
years, when he began farming for himself 
in Genoa township, on a tract of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres deeded him by his 
father. In 1S66 he sold the farm and went 
into the mercantile business at Genoa, 
keeping a general store. In that line he 
continued until 1882, when he sold, and for 
two years lived a retired life. In 1884 he 
opened a hardware store, in partnership 
with his son, but in 1888 retired, lea\ing 
his son sole proprietor. 

Mr. Perkins was married February 28, 
J 85 5, to Margaret Stiles, born in Feeleys- 



burg, Canada, and who died in Genoa, 
March 26, 1880. They became the parents 
of fi\-e children, one of whom died in early 
childhood. Horatio A. is now engaged in 
the hardware business at Genoa and is an 
enterprising business man, at present serv- 
ing as township clerk. He married Sarah 
Holroyd, a daughter of Stephen Holroyd, 
and they have now two children, a son and 
a daughter. Marian married Charles Stott, 
of Des Plaines, Illinois, and they have one 
daughter. Mary married Frank E. White, 
who is operating our subject's farm in Mar- 
tin county, Minnesota. They have five 
children. Jennie married Newton Stanley, 
who is engaged in farming in Riley town- 
ship, McHenry county, Illinois. They have 
three children. Since retiring from the 
mercantile business, Mr. Perkins has given 
personal supervision to his farm of two hun- 
dred and forty acres, lying partly in the vil- 
lage of Genoa. He has twenty acres of 
timber land on the Kishwaukee river, near 
Genoa. In addition he has a farm of three 
hundred and twenty acres in Martin county, 
Minnesota, on which his daughter lives. 
The farm is well improved, having a com- 
fortable house, good barns and outbuildings, 
and is well drained. Since coming into 
possession of his present farm in Genoa, 
Mr. Perkins has rebuilt the house, making 
additions to it, improved and repaired the 
barns, and has laid three miles of tiling. 
He has also sunk a deep well and erected a 
good windmill, and in all has a very valu- 
able place. In politics he is a Republican, 
and for many years was a member of the 
village board, serving five terms as presi- 
dent of the board. For ten years he was a 
member of the county board of supervisors, 
and has served as town clerk, and held 
other minor offices. During the Civil war 



246 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



he was a member of the Union League. As 
a citizen he is thoroughly representative of 
the business interests of his adopted town 
and count\'. 



JOHN McGIRR, a leading and influential 
farmer of .^fton township, De Kalb 
count}', Illinois, is a native of the township, 
born August 7, 1857, and is the son of 
John and Mary (Powers) McGirr, both na- 
tives of Ireland, the father from county 
Dublin, and the mother from county ^^'ater- 
ford, who were the parents of twelve chil- 
dren, si.x of whom are deceased. The 
living are Dennis, John, Rose, Patrick, 
Theresa and Ella. fn [850 John McGirr, 
Sr. , came to America, and first settled in 
St. Charles, Kane county, Illinois, where 
he remained until 1853, when he came to 
De Kalb county, and purchased a farm of 
one hundred and sixty acres of government 
land, which he improved and to which he 
added from time to time until he had six 
hundred and fifteen acres of valuable farm- 
ing lands. He was an industrious and en- 
terprising man, and was quite successful in 
all his business undertakings. 

The subject of this sketch was reared 
in his native township, and educated in its 
public schools. His entire life has been 
spent in farming, with the exception of 
about three years in the stock and grain 
business at Cortland and DeKalb. In 1881 
he made his first purchase of land, buying 
two hundred acres where he now resides. 
To this he has since added eighty acres, 
and also has one hundred and sixty acres 
in Milan township, making his farming 
lands comprise four liundred and forty 
acres, all of which is improved and under 
a high state of cultivation. 



On the 14th of November, 1S82, Mr. 
McGirr married Hannah Redman, a native 
of Pennsylvania, born in 1859, and the 
daughter of Murt Redman, who came to De 
Kalb county in 1871, and by this union 
there were four children born — three are 
living: Murt D., Lewis and Elizabeth, all of 
whom yet remain under the parental roof. 
One child, J. P., is deceased. Religiously 
Mr. McGirr and his family are connected with 
the Roman Catholic church. Politically he 
is a Democrat, having voted that party 
ticket since attaining his majority. He was 
elected road commissioner in 1 89 1 , re-elected 
in 1894 and in 1897. That he makes an 
efficient officer is shown by his continued 
re-election. He has also served as a mem- 
ber of the board of school trustees with 
satisfaction to his fellow-citizens. Frater- 
nally he is a member of the Modern Wood- 
men of America. In a social way he is 
greatly esteemed and has man\' friends 
throughout De Kalb county. 



THOMAS RENWICK, who owns and 
operates a fine farm on section 2, 
South Grove township, is a native of Dum- 
fries county, Scotland, born April 29, 1834, 
and is the son of Walter and Mary (Weil) 
Renwick, the former a native of Scotland 
and the latter of England. They were the 
parents of sixteen children, of whom our 
subject was fourteenth in order of birth. The 
family came from Scotland to America in 
1835, and located first in Canada, where the 
father engaged in farming until 1845, when 
he came to Illinois, located first in Kane 
county and later coming to Cortland town- 
ship, De Kalb county, and from there to 
Pierce township. 

The subject of this sketch was in his 




JOHN McGIRR. 




MRS. JOHN McGIRR. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



251 



infancy when he accompanied his parents 
to Canada, and was but eleven years of age 
when he came with them to Illinois. His 
education was obtained principall}' in the 
common schools of this state. He started 
in life for himself at the age of eighteen 
years, working on a farm by the month at 
ten dollars. On the 9th day of March, 
1864, he married Lucy A. Ramsey, a native 
of South Grove township, De Kalb county, 
and a daughter of George Ramsey, who 
was born in Pennsylvania, and a farmer by 
occupation who came to Illinois in 1838, 
first locating in Monroe township. Ogle 
county, Illinois, where she was born. By 
this union three children have been born: 
Bessie, Luc}- O., and Thomas J. 

Starting in life without a cent and re- 
ceiving no aid from any source, Mr. Ren- 
wick has made a success and has now seven 
hundred and twenty acres of as fine land 
as there . is in De Kalb county, all being 
well improved, with good buildings and 
properly drained. In politics he is an 
ardent Republican and has held the office 
of road commissioner. As a man he enjoys 
the utmost confidence and respect of all 
who know him. 



PETER MILLER is one of the substan- 
tial farmers of De Kalb county, and re- 
sides upon section 24, Shabbona township, 
but is now living retired. For fifty-three 
years he has been a resident of the county, 
arriving here June 7, 1845. He is a native 
of Columbia county, New York, born Feb- 
ruary 21, 1816, and is the son of Simeon 
Miller, who was a farmer of Columbia 
county, and who served as a soldier during 
the war of 18 12. He married Bets}' Bedell, 
with whom he later moved to Cayuga coun- 



ty. New York, where his death occurred in 
1824. His wife survived him a number of 
years, and reared their family of si.x sons 
and six daughters, of whom our subject and 
his brother Robert are the only survivors. 
Robert Miller is a retired farmer and now 
living near Milledgeville, Iowa. The Miller 
family are of German ancestry, the first of 
the family settling in New York in the pio- 
neer days of that state. 

The subject of this sketch grew to mature 
years in Cayuga county. New York, his boy- 
hood and 3-outh being spent on a farm, his 
education being received in the common 
schools, which he attended but a few weeks 
during the winter months. He was mar- 
ried in the town of Victory, Cayuga county. 
New York. February 25, 1841, to Elizabeth 
Quilhot, a native of Cayuga county, and 
a daughter of Henry and Hannah (Van 
Allen) Quilhot, and a sister of Peter V. 
Quilhot, whose sketch appears in this work. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Miller 
commenced their domestic life in the village 
of \'ictory, where he engaged in the hotel 
business for about three years. He then 
came west to Illinois, and took up a claim 
of one hundred and sixty acres in Shabbona 
township, De Kalb county, after which he 
returned to his home in New York. In 
I 84 5 he came with his family to the county, 
by way of the Erie canal to Buffalo, thence 
across the lakes to Chicago, and by teams to 
Shabbona. On the place was a small log 
house, in which they lived for a few years 
while opening up the farm. The country 
was then all new, and for the first two years 
they experienced all the hardships and pri- 
vations of pioneer life. In 1856, the old 
log house gave place to a neat and substan- 
tial residence and as the years went by, 
barns and other outbuildings were erected, 



2S'^ 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and the place was transformed into the sub- 
stantial farm which is seen to-day. 

Mr. and Mrs. Miller have had five chil- 
dren, of whom two are now living. Two of 
their children died in infancy, and one, 
Peter \'., at the age of about ten years. 
The living are Mary Elizabeth and Minard 
S. The former is now the wife of Dr. 
Stewart, of Chicago. Minard S. grew to 
manhood in his nati\'e township, and at 
Kansas City, Missouri, June 30, 1881, mar- 
ried Clara E. Adams, a native of Illinois, 
born at Normal, and a daughter of R. P. 
Adams, of Illinois, who was a soldier in the 
Civil war, serving through the entire service. 
After his discharge he joined his wife in 
Warren county, Indiana, where they resided 
some years, then removed to Kansas, finally 
locating at Dodge Cit}-, in that state. Mrs. 
Mdler was educated in Indiana, and later 
was for two 3 ears a teacher in Dodge City, 
Kansas. Minard S. Miller and wife com- 
menced their domestic life on the farm 
where they now reside. However, he was 
for two years engaged in the livery business 
in Rochelle, Illinois. They have two chil- 
dren, Flossie May and Francis Peter. 

In early manhood our subject was iden- 
tified with the Democratic party, but for 
reason of his liberty loving principles, he 
became identified with the Republican party. 
Office holding has never been to his taste, 
and he has in\ariably declined when any 
ofSce was tendered him. With the growth 
and prosperity of De Kalb county, he has 
been identified for more than half a century. 
He is well known, especially throughout the 
southern section of tlie county, and has 
man}- friends who have the utmost confi- 
dence in him as a man and citizen, and who 
will be pleased to read this sketch in the 
hiographical record of the counts-. 



CHARLES H. CROSBY, deceased, was 
for years a representative of the busi- 
ness and commercial interests of Sycamore. 
He was born in Belvidere, Illinois, February 
27, 1844, and was the son of Frederick and 
Parmelia (Sweet) Crosby, the former a na- 
tive of New York state and a miller by 
trade, who came west at an early day and 
located at Belvidere, Illinois. His death 
occurred November 20, 1846, having been 
born at Dudley, Massachusetts, May 30, 
1S15, son of Nathaniel Crosby. He was 
the grandson of Rev. Pearson Crosby and 
great-grandson of Stephen Crosby. 

The subject of this sketch grew to man- 
hood in his nativ'e city, and received his edu- 
cation in its public schools. In his youth 
he began clerking in a store in Belvidere, 
where he received a good business training. 
In 1872 he came to Sycamore, where he en- 
gaged in business for himself in the line of 
men's furnishing goods, in which he contin- 
ued until his death, April 3, 1893. Previous 
to his leaving Belvidere in October, 1870, 
he was united in marriage with Miss Mary 
E. \\'ing, a native of Cortland, New York, 
and second in a family of seven children 
born to Joseph and Sarah (Johnson) Wing, 
the latter being a daughter of Samuel John- 
son and a natise of New York. Joseph 
Wing was likewise a native of New York; 
his father was David Wing, who married 
Desire Vincent. The}- became the parents 
of seven children. They are descended 
from John Wing, who first came to Boston 
in 1632, from England,, and later settled at 
Lynn in the early colonial period. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Crosby two children were born: 
Grace A. and Harold. The latter died De- 
cember 8, 1893. The former is }-et living, 
and resides with her mother in Sycamore. 
Mrs. Crosb\- and her daughter are members 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



:S3 



of the Congregational church, in which they 
are actively interested. 

Fraternally Mr. Crosby was a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and politically was a Republican. For sev- 
eral years he served as city clerk of Syca- 
more. A man of good business ability, en- 
terprising in all things, the community lost 
an excellent business man, and the wife and 
daughter a loving husband and father. 



CHARLES E. DOANE, after a third of 
a century of hard labor upon the farm, 
is row living a retired life in the village of 
Malta. He was born in De Kalb, St. Law- 
rence county. New York, July 13, 1S38, and 
is the son of Chauncey and Asenath (White) 
Doane, the former a native of Connecticut, 
and the latter of Massachusetts. By occupa- 
tion Chauncey Doane was a farmer, and 
confined himself to agricultural pursuits dur- 
ing his entire life. About 1820, he re- 
moved from Connecticut to New York, 
where he purchased about si.x hundred acres 
of land, all of which was in timber and which 
he cleared up during his life. The wood 
he burned, and the ashes he sold for chemi- 
cal purposes. In this way he paid for his 
land and its clearing. He was a man of 
much push and energy, honest and upright 
to a fault, but a man that always wanted 
what belonged to him. He was born in 
1799, and had just reached his majority 
when he removed from his native state to 
New York. His death occurred in the 
latter state in 1864, while his wife survived 
him some eleven years, dying in 1875, at 
the age of seventy-five years. Their family 
consisted of twelve children, seven of whom 
are living, three now residing in the village 
of Malta, De Kalb county, Illinois. 



Charles E. Doane is the seventh in 
order of birth in the family of his parents. 
He was reared and educated at De Kalb, 
St. Lawrence county. New York, and 
remained at home until twenty-one years of 
age, when he came to De Kalb county, 
Illinois, and located in South Grove town- 
ship, where he purchased one hundred and 
sixty acres of wild prairie land, upon which 
he erected buildings and made other im- 
provements, which materially advanced its 
value. This farm he operated as a general 
farmer up to 189;^, when he purchased 
several lots in Malta, upon one of which he 
resides in a comfortable home. 

On the 6th of January, 1861, Mr. Doane 
was united in marriage with Miss Harriet 
Monroe, a native of New York, born in 1842, 
and a daughter of Thomas and Catherine 
Monroe, the former a native of Canada 
and the latter of New York. By this union 
there are six children, of whom Cora May, 
Byron C. , Kittle and Emma are deceased. 
The living are Malcolm M. and Carrie. The 
former married Miss Eliza Hallet, and oper- 
ates the old homestead. Carrie married 
Jacob Willrett, and they reside in Malta 
township. The father of Mrs. Doane 'died 
in early life, while his wife still survives him 
and is now living at the age of seventy- 
seven years. 

Politically Mr. Doane is a Democrat, 
and a firm beliver in the principles of the 
party. He has been honored with many of 
the township offices, the duties of which he 
has faithfully discharged. 



GEORGE OLMSTEAD is a retired 
farmer and carpenter residing on sec- 
tion 21, Genoa township. He was born at 
Davenport, Delaware county. New York, 



^54 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



December 7, 1S33, and is the son of John 
Ohnstead, who lived and died in that 
county, at the a^e of tift3'-eif;ht 3'ears, He 
was also a farmer and followed shoemaking 
to a limited extent. He was a son of Anson 
and Charity (Merrill) Olmstead, who were 
natives of England. John Olmstead mar- 
ried Sarah A. Cook, who died at the age of 
eighty-two years. They became the par- 
ents of eleven children, of whom our sub- 
ject was third in order of birth. Sarah A. 
Cook was a daughter of John and Sarah 
(Utter) Cook, who attained the ages of 
eighty-five and ninety-five, respectively. 

The subject of this sketch was reared in 
his native county, where he remained until 
April, 1855. He attended a few terms of 
school during the winter months, in country 
districts, until the age of thirteen years, 
since which time he has daily done a man's 
labor, and notwithstanding his many years 
of arduous toil he is still hale and hearty. 
At the age of thirteen he began working out 
on farms, doing a man's work in hay or 
grain fields, but receiving only a bo\''s pay 
— three dollars and a half a month. He 
continued in farm work by the month until 
he came west in 1855. From his New 
York home he came direct to Genoa, Illinois, 
and worked at carpenter work until 1857. 
He then rented a farm, and continued rent- 
ing some eight or nine years, and then pur- 
chased a farm of forty acres in Genoa town- 
ship. He later sold this and moved to Liv- 
ingston county, Illinois, where he resided 
si.x years, having purchased a farm of 
eighty acres of raw prairie land, which he 
very much improved. Mr. Olmstead was 
married in Genoa township, to Miss Mary B. 
Bartholomew, a native of Northumberland 
county, Pennsvlvania, and a daughter o( 
Johnand Jerusha (Evart) Bartholomew. By 



this union five children were born, three of 
whom are living. Henry died at the age of 
one month. Eugene Herbert married Etta 
Wooster, by whom he has two children. 
John married Clara Love, and they have two 
children. Lucy and Catherine were twins, the 
latter now being deceased. Lucy married 
Leonard Durham, and they have one child. 
On the 1 2th of September, 1872, Mr. 
Olmstead sold his Livingston county farm, 
and October 17, of the same year, pur- 
chased a part of his present farm, to which 
he removed and where he has since contin- 
ued to reside. He added to his original 
purchase, until he has now a farm of one 
hundred and sixty-five acres, as fine a body 
of land as one would wish to see. Since 
1 886 he has retired from farming, leasing 
the farm to his son, and giving his entire 
attention to his trade, that of carpentering. 
In politics he is a Republican. For forty- 
seven years he has been an active and con- 
sistent member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, having a love for the Master's cause. 



JOHN L.WVRENCE is a retired farmer 
residing in the city of Sycamore, Illi- 
nois. He is a native of England, born in 
the village of Thurnham, near Lancaster, 
July 10, 1830. Until twelve years of age 
he attended school, provided by the benev- 
olence of a daughter of Sfjuire Dalton, a 
gentleman of large landed estates, who, but 
for his Catholic faith, would have held the 
title of nobility. The school was above the 
usual grade in those days, was free to all re- 
siding in that vicinity, and was supported 
entirely by means furnished by this benev- 
olent 3'oung lady after her father's death. 
Robert Lawrence, the father of our sub- 
ject, was also a nati\e of Thurnham, Eng- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



= 55 



land, and was a common laborer, who for 
many years was employed on canal boats 
running from Galasemdock to Kendall, a 
business at which our subject also worked 
from the time he was old enough to work, 
until coming to America in 1850. Robert 
Lawrence spent his entire life in his native 
shire and died about 1865 at the age of 
seventy-five years. He was a lifelong mem- 
ber of the established Church of England 
and married Jane Thronton. a native of the 
same village, who died when about fifty 
years old. To them were born nine chil- 
dren, three of whom came to America. Ed- 
ward is now living in Elgin. William re- 
tired to Elgin to spend the remainder of his 
life in ease, but died in Burlington, Illinois, 
while visiting his old farm. John is the 
subject of this sketch. 

The three sons, leaving the mother coun- 
try, sailed from Liverpool, March 17, 1850, 
on the vessel Centurian, and were thirty- 
three days on the voyage, encountered one 
severe storm and landed in New York. The 
three brothers came directly west, and, lo- 
cating at St. Charles, Illinois, engaged in 
whatever work they could find to do for two 
years. Our subject worked for the railroad 
company around the depot, was for a time 
helper to masons, building in the town, and 
with his brothers leased a quarry, where 
they worked when not otherwise employed, 
thus losing no time and having stone ready 
for delivery when purchasers came. During 
this time Mr. Lawrence often worked for 
eighty-seven and a half cents a day, board- 
ing himself. He later took a trip south, 
seeking work and prospecting for some good 
place in which to locate. Finding none, 
however, he returned to St. Charles and on 
the 31st of August, 1853, was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Ann Marshall, born in Clif- 



ton, Nottinghamshire, England, October 
II, 1828, and who came to America with 
two of her brothers, John and Thomas, in 
I 85 I, the three taking up their residence in 
St. Charles. In i S48 her brothers, Will- 
iam and George, came to America, and in 
1852 her parents and youngest sister fol- 
lowed. Mrs. Lawrence is the daughter of 
William and Mary (Bingham) Marshall, the 
latter born in Saxelby, Lincolnshire, Eng- 
land, and who died at the age of ninety 
years. She was a daughter of George and 
Jane (Job) Bingham. The former served 
for some years in the British army and died 
at the age of seventy- five years. The lat- 
ter died when about forty years old. Will- 
iam Marshall was born in Dunham, Notting- 
hamshire, England, in 1789, and died in 
1876. He was the son of George Marshall, 
a teacher and highly educated man, who 
died in England, when about seventy-five 
years old. The name of his wife is not 
definitely known, but probably was Miss 
Newbold. Of their eleven children, eight 
came to America. 

To our subject and wife eight children 
have been born. Jennie married Alexan- 
der Evans. Clara is deceased. William is 
also deceased. Thomas resides in Chicago, 
where he is engaged in the commission busi- 
ness. John M., who married Mary Mosher, 
lives in Chicago and they have three chil- 
dren, Rupert, George and Ruth. Emma 
married Charles Wall, a grocer residing in 
Chicago. They have two children, Ray- 
mond and Willard. George married Mer- 
tie Rowe and they reside in Galesville, Wis- 
consin. They have one daughter, Hazel. 
Clara May died in infancy. 

Immediately after his marriage Mr. 
Lawrence purchased a farm at Charter 
Grove, Sycamore township, De Kalb coun- 



'■S6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



t\-. on Which he resided for seven \-ears. 
He then sold out and purchased three hun- 
dred and twenty acres on sections i6 and 17, 
Burhngton township, Kane county, Illinois, 
which was his home until May, 1886, when 
he retired from active life, moved to Syca- 
more, and with his good wife is getting the 
best out of the world in the evening of life. 
Both are hale and heart\', gi\'ing promise of 
maiiy more years of useful life. In politics 
he is a Republican, and while residing in 
Kane county served as road master, school 
director and trustee. Religiously he and 
his wife are members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. As a farmer he was pro- 
gressive, thrifty and energetic, and alwa\s 
had his farm under a high state of cultiva- 
tion. 



BROWN & BROWN, bankers of Genoa, 
Illinois, are well known throughout De 
Kalb and adjoining counties, being among 
the live business men of the place. They 
are sons of Jeremiah Libb}- Brown, who for 
many years was one of the most prominent 
citizens of Genoa township, a native of 
Scarborough, Maine, born April 17, 1805. 
He was the son of Benjamin Brown, who 
was probably a native of Scotland. Jere- 
miah L. Brown married Ruth Libby, and in 
1837 came to De Kalb count}-, Illinois, 
where later his death occurred. 

Jeremiah L. Brown, the father of our 
subject, attended the common schools of his 
native state during the winter terms until 
the age of eighteen \'ears. He then ran 
away to sea on a whaling vessel, and was 
gone three years, during which time he 
never heard a word from home. Soon after 
his return, he removed with his parents to 
the town of Hope, Hamilton county. New 



York, and on the 17th of August, 1830, 
married Judith Richardson, of Johnstown, 
New York, who died March 4, 1848. By 
that union seven children were born — Julia 
A., James P., Judith, Esther E., Abigail J., 
Ruth S. and Jeremiah W. Of these Julia 
A. and Ruth S. are deceased. The second 
union of Jeremiah L. Brown was solemnized 
May 2, 1850, when he married Eliza A. 
Jackman, born May 26, 1825, a daughter 
of Abner and Mary Jackman, of Sycamore 
township. By this last union were born 
Emma R., Dillon S., Charles A. and Liz- 
zie M. 

By way of the canal and lakes, Jeremiah 
L. Brown came west in 1S36, ana settled 
first in Peoria, Peoria county, Illinois, but 
returned east and in 1837 again came west, 
driving through by team from New York, 
coming direct to Genoa township, De Kalb 
county, reaching Genoa at sunset, Septem- 
ber 20, 1837. By trade he was a shoemaker, 
which occupation he followed in the east, 
but on coming to De Kalb county took up 
land on section 30, Genoa township, and 
there followed agricultural pursuits. He 
became a successful farmer and soon ac- 
quired over a section of land. Three years 
before his arrival white men had hardly set 
foot in De Kalb county. The country was 
in its nati\'e wildness and Indians roamed at 
will over its prairies and through the timber, 
engaged in their regular hunting e.\peditions. 
In local affairs Mr. Brown became quite 
prominent and was kept in office by his 
neighbors the greater part of the time. He 
was a man of superior education, and be- 
cause of that fact his services were in de- 
mand. For man}' terms he served as one 
of the county board of supervisors. In 
early life he was an Abolitionist, and when 
the Republican party was formed attached 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



257. 



himself to it and became an earnest advo- 
cate of its principles until his death, Janu- 
ary 5, 1882. Well known and hi.c^hly re- 
spected, his death left a void in the county. 

Dillon S. Brown, senior member of the 
banking house of Brown & Brown, Genoa, 
was born May 12, 1852, on the old home 
farm in Genoa township, where he grew to 
manhood. His primary education was ob- 
tained in the schools of Genoa and Syca- 
more, after which he entered the Illinois 
State University, at Champaign, from which 
he graduated in 1875, in a class of thirt)-- 
seven persons. He then attended McGill 
Veterinary College, at Montreal, Canada, 
from which he was graduated in 1877. 
After following his profession in Sycamore 
some two or three years, he formed a part- 
nership with H. H. Slater, in the general 
mercantile business at Genoa. After the 
e.xpiration of one year he withdrew from 
that firm, and forming a partnership with 
his brother, Charles A., began the bank- 
ing business in Genoa, in which line he has 
since continued with gratifying success. 

Dillon S. Brown was married May 16, 
1878, to Miss Emily E. Pond, a native of 
Pennsylvania, and daughter of Americus H. 
Pond, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere 
in this work. By this union five children 
have been born, two of whom died in in- 
fancy, and Claude in early childhood. The 
living are Earl and Baird, pupils of the 
Genoa schools. 

Fraternally Mr. Brown is a member of 
the Masonic order, and in politics he is a 
thorough Republican, believing in protection 
and reciprocity. For some years he was a 
member of the village board of trustees and 
for a time was president of the same. He 
was also a member of the board of education 
of Genoa, giving of his time to advance the 



educational interests of the place. At 
present he is a member of the county board 
of supervisors, an office which he has filled 
in a most satisfactory manner. 

Charles A. Brown, junior member of the 
firm of Brown & Brown, was born on the 
home farm in Genoa township, January 12, 
1858. His education was obtained in the 
common schools and in the high schools at 
Genoa, from which he was graduated in 
I 88 1 after pursuing a four-years course. He 
then went to Chicago, where he studied one 
term in Bryant & Stratton's Commercial 
College, and then returned home and en- 
gaged in farming a few months until the 
banking firm of Brown & Brown was 
formed, since which time he has given 
almost his undivided attention to his bank- 
ing interests. 

Charles A. Brown was married in June, 
1889, to Miss Ada M. Olmstead, a native 
of Genoa township, and a daughter of A. 
H. and Rebecca J. (Eichler) Olmstead. By 
this union three children have been born: 
Loyal, Gladj's and Lorine. Fraternally 
Mr. Brown is a member of Genoa Lodge, 
A. F. & A. M., in which he has served as 
secretary and worshipful master, and which 
he has represented in the grand lodge of the 
state. In politics he is a I-iepublican. The 
onl}' offices which he has held have been that 
of township treasurer and village trustee. 

While there is much truth in the stricture 
made upon the modern scrambler for the al- 
mighty dollar who seeks to accumulate vast 
fortunes by selfish and unscrupulous means, 
there is nothing more worthy of praise than 
the quiet and stead}' pursuit of some honest 
calling, which enables men to acquire a 
home and competence. The firm of Brown 
& Brown is one to whose energy and fore- 
sight the village of Genoa and northern De 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Kalb county is indebted (or many improve- 
ments. While they are prosperous busi- 
ness men, and have given close attention to 
their private affairs, they have never for- 
gotten or ignored that bond of common 
interest which should unite the people of 
every community, and they have ever been 
ready to promote progress in e\'ery line. 



WILLIAM HUBBARD, after more than 
half a century of honest toil on a 
farm in De Kalb township, is now living a 
retired life in the city of De Kalb, Illinois. 
He is a native of Cortland, Cortland coun- 
ty. New York, born April 21, 1823, and is 
the son of Joel and Clarinda Hubbard, na- 
tives of Massachusetts and Connecticut re- 
spectively. Joel Hubbard was a shoemaker- 
by trade, and a man of some note in his na- 
tive count}'. He was born September 5, 
1788, and died in Michigan, March 25, 
183S. His wife was born November 14, 
1785, and died in New York, March 28, 
1827. Their family consisted of eight chil- 
dren: Palmira, born October 3, 1809; 
Forona, March 23, 181 i; Lanson, June 22, 
181 3; Henry, May 18, 181 5; Alfred, March 
22, 181 7; Fanny, May 4, 1S20; William, as 
above stated; and Ansel, November 7, 
1825. Of these Fanny died February 15, 
1822. 

William Hubbard is seventh in order of 
birth, and was only four years of age when 
his mother died, and but fifteen years old 
when he came to De Kalb county in 1838, 
locating in De Kalb township. With an 
elder brother he walked from Michigan to 
De Kalb, Illinois, but remained one sum- 
mer at Sugar Grove, Illinois. His edu- 
cation, begun in the common schools of the 
east, was completed in the district schools 



of De Kalb county, which he attended for 
two years after his arrival. Soon after 
leaving school he made a purchase of nine- 
ty acres of land from the government 
which he reclaimed and beautified, making 
of it one of the most productive farms in 
De Kalb township. This land he retained 
for about fifty-five years, the best, hap- 
piest and most profitable days of his life. 

On the 26th of May, 1850, he married 
Miss Nancy Churchill, daughter of David 
and Anna Churchill, by whom he has had 
three children, two yet living: Joel W. , born 
March 9, 1851; and Elma A., October 28, 
1852. Edgar, born June 14, 1854, died 
June 9, 1880. Mrs. Hubbard was born in 
Geneseo county. New York, January 25, 
1824. Her parents, David and Anna 
Churchill, were natives of \'ermont, the 
former dying at the age of seventy-four 
years and the latter when forty-four years 
old. 

In 1897. Mr. Hubbard sold his farm and 
removed to the city of De Kalb, that he 
might spend his remaining days in ease and 
comfort. He is worthy of the rest, and no 
man stands higher in the estimation of his 
fellow citizens. 



FORREST REEVES HAMMOND is a 
well-known farmer residing in Sycamore, 
Illinois. The Hammond family is one of the 
oldest of colonial families and took part in 
the stirring times during the early settlement 
remote from the coast. Our subject is de- 
scended from one of three brothers from 
England, who settled on what was known 
as Canaan Mountain, Pennsylvania. Some 
of the family settled in Tioga county and 
others in Chemung county, New York. Dur- 
ing the Indian wars prior to the Revolution 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



2 59 



the Hammonds were great sufferers. Sev- 
eral of them were taken prisoners at the 
time of the Wyoming massacre. One of 
them, Laban Hammond, a great nncle of 
our subject, with fourteen others, was placed 
in a circle to be executed by an Indian queen. 
After the first one was tomahawked the un- 
cle sprang up, beat his way through the 
crowd and escaped, while the others were 
all killed. In March of the following year 
with two others he was again captured. 
While an old Indian who ^v■as guarding the 
prisoners was replenishing the fire Laban 
killed five of his captors and then struck 
another across the neck while on his knees, 
leaving him, as he supposed, dead. He 
made good his escape the second time. 
Years afterwards, seeing an Indian with a 
stiff neck and head bent down, he asked him 
how it happened and the laconic reply re- 
ceived was: "Yankee, Wyommg." He 
thought best not to inform the Indiati that 
he was the Yankee. 

Our subject's great-grandparents, 01i\er 
and Mary Hammond, were born near the 
middle of the eighteenth century, the former 
December 25, 1759, and the latter .May 4, 
1 76 1. The first named died at the age of 
forty-five, while the latter attained the good 
old age of seventy-nine years. They were 
pioneers in the wilds of Pennsylvania, suf- 
ferred terrors from Indian depredations on 
the frontier and passed through the stirring 
scenes of the Revolution. 

Lebbeus Hammond, the grandfather of 
our subject, was born December 6, 1786, 
married Cynthia P. Matthewson, who was 
born July 25, 17S6. An interesting anecdote 
is related of her courage, as part of the 
familv traditions. \\'hen she was onl\- 
eleven years of age a man near her father's 
house cut his leg with an ad;;e and was 



bleeding to death. There was a surgeon 
across the ri\'er, the bridge was washed away 
and the ri\er \\as higher than it was e\-er 
known. Xn man would volunteer to go for 
the doctor. Her father said that he knew 
Cynthia would do it and asked her if she 
would undertake to cross tlie river. She 
replied that she \\'ould if he would let her 
ride " Pomp," her favorite horse. Permis- 
sion was granted and her father cautioned 
her in returning to ride up stream to a cer- 
tain point, where she would find a safe land- 
ing on the west bank. On reaching the 
doctor's and stating her errand he refused 
to cross the river with her, remarking, "Let 
the man die; I will not cross in such a 
fiood." She ridiculed him, asking him if he 
could not do what she had done. He finally 
consented to go and started into the stream 
near by. She told him her father's direc- 
tions, rode in front, the doctor follow- 
ing, and both safely landed. The doctor 
arrived in time to save the man's life. 
When asked if she was not afraid, she re- 
plied that she was not, as she knew that 
Pomp could stay on top of the water and 
she could stay on top of him. 

Our subject's father, also named Lebbeus 
Hammond, was born June S, 1830, at 
Palmyra, Wayne county. Sew York, and 
came west in the spring of 1854, and died 
.\pril 25, 1855. He married Mary Reeves, 
who died about 18G7 at the age of thirty- 
four years, leaving two children, Cynthia 
Philuria and Forrest Reeves. 

The subject of this sketch was born in 
Sxxamore townshp a few weeks after the 
arrival of the family. His mother died 
when he was but twehe years (jf age. and 
having remarried after the death of her first 
husband, he lived with his stepfather and re- 
ceived his education in the district school. 



26o 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



supplemented by one )'ear in the schools of 
Sycamore. At the age of twenty-one he 
came into possession of his father's farm of 
one hundred and twenty-two and a half acres, 
nn sections i6, 21 and 22, to which he later 
added twenty-eight and a half acres, making 
him a fine tract of one hundred and hfty-une 
acres. For some years he has been en- 
gaged in dairy farming, usually keeping 
about forty head of milch cows. In Decem- 
ber, 1890, he removed to Sycamore but 
still gives his personal attention to the farm. 

On the 17th of May, 1879, Mr. Ham- 
mond was unite<l in marriage at Sycamore, 
with Miss S. Frances Hamilton, who was 
born in De I\alb township between the 
cities of Sycamore and De I\alb, and is a 
daughter of Oscar and Catilina (Johnson) 
Hamilton. By this union three children 
have been born: Elmer D., Lloyd I. and 
Harry H. 

In politics Mr. Hammond is a Republic- 
an, and while residing in the country ser\-ed 
as school director. Fraternally he is a 
member of Sycamore Lodge, Order of For- 
esters. 



CHARLES H. MOKDOFF, M. D.. of 
Genoa, Illinois, is a well known and 
successful physician and surgeon who has 
been in active practice in that village for 
about seventeen years. He traces his an- 
oestry back to James Mordoff, Sr., a native 
of Scotland, who came to America prior to 
the Revolutionary war, and settled in King- 
ston, Canada, where he died June 17, 1789. 
His wife lived to be one hundred and se\en- 
teen years old. Their son, also named 
James, born in Kingston, Canada, May 12, 
1762, died at the age of fifty-nine years, 
eight months and twenty days. About 



1790 he moved from Canada to New York, 
where his last days were spent. He was a 
man of good education, and it was said of 
him that he was "neither priest nor law- 
yer, but a learned man." He married 
Lois Charters, who was born December 17, 
1790, and who died at the age of ninety- 
seven years, in western New York. Their 
son, James Mordofl', Jr., one of twelve chil- 
dren, was born in New York, .Vpril 24, 
1795. He married Polly Dunn, and came 
west in Ma}', i''~'45, locating in Bonne 
count}', Illinois. 

George ]. Mordoff, the son of James 
Mordoff, jr., was fifth in a family of si.x 
children. He was born in Portage, Wyom- 
ing county. New ^'ork, March 26, 1831, and 
came west with his parents in 1845, com- 
ing overland b}' wagons. It was a long, 
weary trip, and all were well pleased on 
their arrival in Boone county. With his 
parents he continued to reside until after he 
attained his majorit}'. He was married in 
Beh'idere, Illinois, Ma}' 2, 1854, to Miss 
Sarah Whitman, a native of Chautauqua 
county, New York, born in September, 
1832. Her father, Charles Whitman, was 
born in Bennington, Vermont, January 4, 
iSoo. At the age of twenty-fi\'e he went 
to New York, where, in 1824, at Fort Miller, 
he married Mary Ann Jakeway, a daughter 
of Charles Jakeway. In 1836, they came 
west and located in Boone county, Illinois. 
George J. Mordoff continued to reside in 
Boone county until 1884, when he removed 
to Genoa, to make his home with our sub- 
ject. He was a well-known \'etiriiiary sur- 
geon, and for many }'ears practiced his pro- 
fession in Boone and De Kalb counties. 

Charles H. Mordoff is the only child 
born to George J. and Sarah (Whitman,! 
Mordoff. He was born near Belvidere, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



261 



Boone county, Illinois, July 22, 1S56. 
After attending the district school he entered 
the high school at Belvidere, from which he 
was graduated in the spring of 1873. He 
early showed a decided taste for the medical 
profession and at the age of twelve years, in 
an irregular way, he began reading medi- 
cine. After his graduation from the high 
school for two years he read medicine 
with Dr. F. S. Whitman, of Belvidere, and 
later entered the Chicago Homeopathic 
Medical College, from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1881. On the 31st of January, 
1882, he located in fieuoa, where he has 
since remained, having bviilt up a large 
practice which extends fm- many miles 
around. In politics he is a I-vepublican and 
fraternally a member of Genoa Lodge, Xo. 
768, I. O. O. P.; Ellwood Encampment, 
No. 173, of Sycamore; Canton Truman, No. 
2, of Sycamore; and Sarah Rebecca, No. 
134, of Sycamore; Maple Leaf Lodge, No. 
283, K. of P., of Genoa; Genoa Camp 
No. 163, M. W. A.; Royal Neighbors, of 
Genoa; and of the Oriental Order of the 
Magi, of Chicago. Former!}' he was a mem- 
ber of the Knights of the Globe. Profes- 
sionally he is a member of the Illinois Home- 
pathic Medical Society and the American 
Institute of Homeopathw As a citizen he 
stands high in the estimation of the people. 



JOHN MILLER, who is now living a re- 
'J tired life in the village of Fairdale, is a 
native of Oneida county. New ^'ork, born 
February 9, 1818, and is the son of John 
and Mary (Criin Miller, b^th natives of Her- 
kimer county. New York. Thev were the 
parents of twelve children, as follows: 
Thomas, Mary, Catherine, John, Daniel, 
Margaret, Elizabeth, James, Henry, Nancy, 



Julia A. and Chester A. The paternal 
grandfather, John Miller, who was a native 
of Germany, came to America prior to 
the Revolutionary war, and was a soldier 
in that war. The maternal grandfather, 
Thomas Crill, was also a native of Germany, 
who came to America before the Re\-olution- 
ary war. and assisted m the struggle lor in- 
dependence. 

In his nati\e county and state the sub- 
ject of this sketch grew to manhood, and 
received a limited cducatioii in the schools 
of that early da\-. In I S44 he came to Illi- 
nois, located in Ogle county, where he first 
purchased eighty acres of government land, 
to which he later added another eighty acres. 
That tract he iin[iro\i'd until it was one of 
the best in Ogle county. On the iSth of 
November, 1847, he married Mary E. War- 
ren, a native of Delaware, and the\' com- 
menced their domestic life on the farm 
which he had purchased some three \ears 
previouslx". They there continued to reside, 
a period of fortv-two yenrs. when Mrs. Mil- 
ler was called to her rrward, her death oc- 
curring June 9, I 889, at the age of si\t\'-h\'e 
years. 

After the death of his wile, Mr. ^filler 
sold his farm and moved to Fairdale, where 
he is now living a retired life. He is a mem- 
ber of the Christian church, of which body 
his wife was als(j a member. In politics he 
is a Republican, and while in Ogle county 
held the office of road couimissioner and 
school director. 

Elizabeth McBride, the sister of Mr. 
Miller, who is now acting as his housekeeper, 
was also horn in Oneida county. New York, 
.April 25, [S24. In 1846 she came with her 
parents to Ogle county. Illinois, and in 1851 
married James McBride, a native of New 
■\'ork state, b\- whom she had seven children. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



five of whom are living, George, Elizabeth, 
Alice, Grant and Cura. The deceased are 
Leona and Luc}' F. Her husband died in 
Iowa in 1874, at the ajje of sixty years. 



MD. SHIPMAN, of the firm of Bradt & 
Shipman, of De I\alb, Illinois, is one 
of the leading business men of that city. 
He is a native of Cortland county. New 
York, and was born on the 1 itli of June, 
1S4S. He is the son of Dr. J. A. and Azu- 
bah (Hunter) Shipman, both of whom were 
horn in New York state. 

Dr. |. \. Shipman was a skilled physi- 
cian and a man whose influence for good 
was felt not oidy within the large circle of 
his own patr(Tnage, but all through his ac- 
quaintances far and near. In 1S53 he re- 
moved to Bureau count}', Illinois, where he 
successfully practiced his profession. In 
1868 he moved to De Kalb, Illinois, from 
which place he removed in 1S73, to Henry 
county, from Henry county to Prairie City, 
Illinois. Here he resided for the remainder 
of his days, respected as a citizen, trusted 
as a physician, and honored as a gentleman 
of th(j highest order. Dr. Shipman passed 
to his reward March 6, 1885, at the age of 
seventy-three years, whi-le his wife's demise 
had occurred many years before when they 
were residents of De Kalb. She was fifty- 
two years of age at the time of her death. 
Their family consisted of five children, two 
of whom are now living, Mrs. Mattie Mack- 
lin of this city, and M. D., the subject of 
this sketch. 

M. D. Shipman is second in order of 
birth. He received his early schooling in 
the district schools of Bureau county and 
high school of De Kalb, and subsequently 
attended the Northwestern University at 



Evanston, Illinois. At the conclusion of his 
school days in 1872, he became associated 
with C. E. Bradt in the manufacture and 
sale of gloves at wholesale. Their factory is 
on Sixth near Main street, De Kalb. The 
same firm is also extensively engaged in the 
manufacture of delivery wagons and patent 
glove fasteners, at Gloversville, New York, 
under the firm name of Shipman, Bradt & 
Co., which business has grown to a great 
extent. Mr. Shipman has the entire confi- 
dence of the citizens of De Kalb. He has 
been elected to the presidency of the board 
of education, and is president of the Elec- 
tric Light Company of De Kalb. He is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
of which he is a wortliy trustee. 

On the 20th of December, 18S2. Mr. 
Shipman was united in marriage with Miss 
Jennie B. Bradt, daughter of .\. and Amy 
A. Bradt, a sketch of whom appears else- 
where in this work. To this union has been 
born three children; Andrew, born in 1883: 
Louise, in 1885: and Orville, in 18S8. Mr. 
Shipman has descended from a noble line 
of ancestors, whose skill, lo3alty and patri- 
otism has been handed down to posterity by 
the pen of the historian. His grandfather, 
Daniel Shipman, was the father of five phy- 
sicians of wide influence and practice in New 
York and Illinois. Daniel Shipman was an 
early settler of Saybrook, and was a Pres- 
byterian minister of the old school. He was 
especially distinguished for his industry and 
strict integrity. His wife, the grandmother 
of our subject, was Sarah Eastman, a daugh- 
ter of Dr. Azariah Eastman, an eminent 
physician of his day, and who creditably 
bore the armor of his profession for nearly 
seventy years. Dr. Eastman was a lineal 
descendant of the Franklins, and a relation 
of the illustrious statesman and philosopher. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



263 



Three of Daniel Shipman's brothers and 
granduncles of our subject, were actively 
engaged in the Revolutionary war, and at 
one time were taken prisoners by the 
British and held as such in a prison ship 
at Brooklyn, New York. They were early 
settlers in Connecticut, and were of Eng- 
lish descent. The Hunters on the mother's 
side were of Scotch extraction, a people 
noted for their nobleness of character. 



A CHARLES DOAXE, marble dealer of 
Sycamore, is a native of De Kalb 
county, born in South Grove township, 
August 2, 1855, and resided in that town- 
ship until the age of twelve years, when he 
moved with his parents to .Malta. He re- 
ceived a good common-school education, 
with instruction in some of the higher 
branches, and for some years taught school 
during the winter months and worked at his 
frade of carpenter during the summer. He 
is the son of Joseph E. and Margaret (Mur- 
phy) Doane, the former a native of St. 
Lawrence county. New York, born Decem- 
ber 18, 1835, and the latter a native of Ire- 
land, who came to America with her parents 
at the age of two years. Joseph E. Doane 
came west in 1854, and settled in South 
Grove township, De Kalb count)', Illinois. 
He was by trade a carpenter and an excel- 
lent and energetic workman, always com- 
manding higher wages than others. On 
coming to De Kalb county he purchased a 
farm in South Grove township, and later 
purchased his present farm of three hun- 
dred and thirty-four and ;i half acres adjoin- 
ing the village uf Malta. To Joseph E. 
Doane and wife seven children were born: 
Virginia L. . now the wife of Rev. Cass 
Davis, of Sterling, Illinois: A. Charles, our 



subject; Leslie A., who is farming in Wis- 
consin; William D., who is mining in Col- 
orado; Dorothy M., a fine vocalist, who re- 
sides at home; Seymour G., who is rail- 
roading in Wyoming; and .Agnes K., wife of 
W. I. Collins, of Malta. 

In the spring of 1S79, our subject went 
to Colorado, and located eighteen miles 
north of Leadville, where he remained three 
and a half years, prospecting and mining. 
This not proving profitable, he returned to 
Illinois in the fall of 1882, and taught school 
duringthe winter of 1882-83. In the spring 
of 1883 he went to Dakota, but not being 
satisfied, he returned to Malta, where he 
worked at carpentering and farming for'five 
\-ears. From Malta he went to Chicago, 
where he worked five months in a factory, 
then for four years at his trade. In .August, 
1896, he came to Sycamore and engaged 
in the marble business. He knew nothing 
whate\-er of that line of trade, but soon ad- 
justed himself to it, and has now a thorough 
understanding of the business. With char- 
acteristic energy he soon built up a large 
trade, which is constantly increasing. His 
greatest endeavor has been to make his 
reputation for reliable work and material, 
and a name equal to that of his father for 
probity and honesty. 

Mr. Doane has been twice married, — 
first in 1886, with Miss Jennie Earl, who 
died within a year after their marriage. 
His second union was with Miss Jeannette 
Morey, the wedding ceremonj- being cele- 
brated in Malta township in 1888. She is 
the daughter of Ariel S. and Elizabeth (Van 
Vlack) Morey. The former is a native of 
Herkimer county. New York, born May 24, 
1840, and who came west when a boy with 
his parents. Smith and Jeannette (Smithl 
Morey. Smith More\- was the son of Jesse 



264 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Murev. Mrs. Elizabeth Murey is the daugh- 
ter of William and Maria (Oliver) Van 
Vlack. Ariel Morey and wife are the par- 
ents of five children, of whom Mrs. Doane 
is second in order of liirtli. Mr. and Mrs. 
Doane have two sons, Harry 'nd Milo, now 
attendmg the home school. 

Mr. and Mrs. Doane are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, in the work of 
which the\' are acti\ely engasjed. Frater- 
nalh' he is a member of the Modern W'ooil- 
men of America and Home Forum, while 
Mrs. Doane is a member of the Daughters 
of the Globe and Home Forum. Mr. 
Doane comes of a musical family, and is 
himself a musician of more than ortlinary 
ability. For four years he was the leader 
of the Malta band, and under his leadership 
the band liad an excellent reputation 
tliroughout northern Illinois. 



RICHARD B. PROCTOR, an enterpris- 
ing farmer of Franklin township, is a 
native of Kno.x cttunty, Ohio, born Sep- 
tember 29, 1827, and is the son of Thomas 
and Ehza (Norton) Proctor, the former a 
native of New York and the latter of Penn- 
sylvania. They were the [parents of four 
children, Elizabeth, Mary A., Richard B. 
and Watie jane, all of whom are deceased 
save our subject. The paternal grandfa- 
ther, Richard Proctor, was a native of 
England prior to the Revolutionary war. 
and settled in Pennsylvania. In an early 
day Thomas Proctor, the father, removed 
from his Pennsylvania home to Knox coun- 
ty. Ohio, and there engaged in farming. He. 
however, lived but a short time after his 
arrival, and died November 11, 1829, at 
the age of thirty-five years. His widow 
later married Dr. Andrew Shephard. a native 



of New York, and in 1836 they came to Illi- 
nois and located in Ogle county. Three 
years later they removed to De Kalb county, 
and purchased one hundred and sixty acres 
of government land, the farm on which our 
subject now resides. Both the Doctor and 
his wife died upon that farm. 

The subject of this sketch came to Illi- 
nois with his mother and stepfather, and 
with them continued to reside. He was 
reare<I upon the farm and received his edu- 
cation in the common district school. On 
the 12th of March, 1856, he was united in 
marriage with Miss Sarah C. Lyon, and by 
this union there are twehe children, three 
of wh<.)m died in infancy. The living are 
Lizzie, Willis, Ada, Arthur, Clara, Ernest, 
Clark, Ralph and Glenn. Of these, Ada 
married Rev. Dr. John Butcher, a nati\e of 
England, and with him spent ten \ears in 
India, where he was engaged in missionary 
work. The Doctor is a highly educated 
man, a tine worker, and is now located at 
Palatine, Illinois. Clark is a physician lo- 
cated in Des Mi^ines, Iowa. Willis is a 
professor in the college at Kirksville, Mis- 
souri. Clara is also a physician, and is a 
graduate of the Albion, Michigan, College; 
is now at Kirksxille, Missouri. Ralph is on 
the home farm, while Glenn is attending 
school. 

The maternal grantlfather, Isaac Nor- 
ton, Jr., was a native of Long Island, New 
York, and was a tailor by trade. His fa- 
ther. Rev. Isaac Norton, Sr. , was a native 
of England, who came to America before 
the Revolution, and during that struggle 
was a chaplain in the army. He was also 
chaplain in the halls of congress at Phila- 
delphia. Religiously he was a Baptist. 
His death occurred at the age of ninety- 
two years. Rev. Isaac Norton, Jr., was 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



265 



also a Baptist minister, and died at Byron, 
Illinois, at the age of eighty-seven years. 
Two uncles of our subject, Isaac and Bart- 
lett Norton, were soldiers in the war of 
1812. Few families have a better record 
for patriotism than that of the Nortons. 

In politics Mr. Proctor is a Prohibition- 
ist, believing firmly in the principles of that 
party. For thirteen \ears he served as 
school trustee. A member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, he takes an active interest 
in the work, giving of his time and means to 
advance the cause of religion and morality. 
He has been a very successful farmer, and 
has now four hundred and seventeen acres 
of well impro\'ed land. No man in Frank- 
lin township is held in higher esteem. 



GEORGE E. SISLEY, postmaster of 
Genoa and editor of the Genoa Issue, 
was born in Chicago, Illinois, April 3, 1865, 
and is the son of William and Anna (Ly- 
man) Sisley, both natives of New York, 
and who were the parents of four children 
as follows: William L., a merchant of 
Hampshire, Illinois; Lyman A., a mining 
broker, in Butte, Montana; Emma L. , 
wife of Charles H. Backus, of Hampshire, 
Illinois; and George E., our subject. The 
mother died in Hampshire about 1887. 

George E. Sisley removed with his par- 
ents to Geneva, when quite young, and 
there grew to manhood, receiving his edu- 
cation in the public schools of that city. 
Entering the office of the Geneva Republican 
he spent four years in learning the printer's 
trade. He then went to Elgin, Illinois, 
where he remained one year, working at 
his trade, and from there went to Hamp- 
shire, Illinois, and started the Hampshire 
Register, with which he \\ as connected until 



1890. In that year he went to Port Town- 
send, Washington, where he remained a 
year and a half. Returning east, he was 
employed at his trade in Chicago during 
the World's Fair. In March, 1894, he 
came to Genoa and purchased the Genoa 
Issue, of which he has since been editor 
and publisher. 

Mr. Sisley was married June 25, 1891, 
at Hampshire, Illinois, with Miss Gertrude 
Schoonmaker, daughter of Michael J. and 
Florence (Webb) Schoonmaker, the former 
a na'ive of Fairdale, Oswego count}-. New 
York, born October 24, 1S36, and who died 
May 5, 1S97. He was the son of Michael 
and Kate (Van Alstine) Schoonmaker, and 
came west about 1856, locating first at 
Marengo, Illinois In his youth he learned 
the carpenter's trade, which occupation he 
followed until his death. He lived a few 
years in various towns in Iowa and Illinois, 
removing to Hampshire, Illinois, in 1874, 
where the remainder of his life was spent. 
During the Civil war he served as a mem- 
ber of Compan)- K, T'lfteenth Illinois 'Vol- 
unteer Infantry. He was married July 4, 
1866, in Marengo, Illinois, to Miss Flor- 
ence Webb, born in Forrest, New York, 
and a daughter of Frederick and Catherine 
(Mead) Webb, the latter a daughter of 
Amos and Phebe (Ashley) Mead. By trade 
Frederick Webb was a carpenter, and came 
west and settled in Marengo, Illinois, where 
his death occurred at the age of seventy- 
three years. He was a son of Bliss and 
Flora Webb. Of the eight children born 
to Michael J. and Florence Schoonmaker, 
Mrs. Sisley is second in order of birth. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Sisley one son has been 
born, George Raymond. 

Mr. Sisley is \-cry fond of athletic 
sports, and he is an enthusiastic wheel- 



266 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



man. Fraternally he is a member of Ge- 
nua Lodge, A. F. ^: A. M., and of Syca- 
more Chapter, K. A. M. He is also a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and Modern Woodmen of America. 
As a citizen he is thoroughl}' ali\e to the 
best interests of his adopted city and coun- 
ty, and through the columns of his paper 
advocates every measure lor the public 
good. In politics he is a thorough Repub- 
lican and as a re^vard for services ren- 
dered his party, was appointed postmaster 
of Genoa in November, 1897. He was 
also city treasurer in 1890. 



HARRISON MACKEY. for many years 
one of the leading citizens of Mayfield 
township, residing on section 11, where he 
had a fine farm of over five hundred acres 
of land, was a nati\e of New York, born in 
Ulster count}-. April 22, iSi^;, and was the 
son of Levi and Rebecca 1 Scott, Mackey, 
also natives of New Y'ork, who there spent 
their entire lives. The Mackeys are of 
German ancestry, the first of the name set- 
tling in New York at a very early day. Levi 
and Rebecca Mackey were the parents of 
eight children — John, Julia A., Griffin, Gil- 
man, Harriet, Harrison, Thorn M. and 
Mary j. The father died ab(jut 1S5S and 
the mother in June. 1838. 

The subject of this sketch remained at 
home until about fifteen years of age. when 
he went to Orange county. New York, for 
the purpose of learning the blacksmith's 
trade. After serving an apprenticeship of 
about four years, he went to New Jerse_\- 
and worked as a journeyman about one 
year, and then spent several months in his 
nati\'e county, returning to Orange countv, 
where he commenced business for himself 



at his trade and continued for six years. 
The great west was now being rapidly set- 
tled, and. like many others, he determined 
to seek his fortune in the Prairie state. In 
the spring of 1839 he came to Mayfield 
township and located upon section 1 1, where 
he opened up a farm and there spent the 
remainder of his life. 

Mr. Macke}' was first married in Orange 
county. New York, about 1834, to Miss 
Mary Hall, a native of Sullivan county. New 
York, and by this union there were three 
children: Julia A. was the wife of J. O. 
Westlake. She died .\pril 8, 1869. Mary 
R. married H. H. Coleman, and they reside 
in Sycamore. Eli^a J. married J. E. Parker, 
and they also live in Sycamore. Mrs. Mackey 
died in Mayfield township January 22, 1856, 
and Mr. Macke\- was again married in New 
York state, June 18, 1857. to Mrs. Eliza 
(Bondj Westlake, widow of Benjamin West- 
lake, who died in Orange county, New York, 
November 18, 1853. By her former mar- 
riage she became the mother of se\en chil- 
dren—David B., Milton G., Hannah E., 
Mary .\. , Charlotte W., John O. and Morris 
H. Milton G. died when nearly twenty-one 
years of age. Mrs. Mackey was born in 
Orange county. New York, December i, 
iSii, and died in Mayfield township, De 
Kalb county, Illinois, July 8, I 888, and was 
buried in the cemetery at Sycamore. She 
was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, of which her husband was an at- 
tendant. 

In addition to general farming, in which 
he was quite successful, Mr. Mackey en- 
gaged in dairying for a time and also in 
stock raising. He became quite prominent 
in the affairs of the township and held many 
local offices. Politically, he was thoroughly 
independent, voting for the one he consid- 




HARRISON MACKEY. 




MRS. MARY HALL MACKEY. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ered the best man, regardless of party. A 
pioneer of the county, he was instrumental 
in its growth and development and did all 
that he could to advance its material inter- 
est. As a citizen he was thoroughly pro- 
gressive, and as a neighbor he was kind and 
obliging, ever ready to render a favor. His 
death occurred upon the old home farm 
August 22, 1890, and his remains were laid 
to rest in the old family graveyard in Ma}'- 
field township. 



CHARLES E. BRADT, a well known 
business man of De I\alb, Illinois, and 
a member of the firm of Bradt & Shipman. 
glove manufacturers, has spent almost his 
entire life in De Kalb count}-. He is a na- 
tive of Gloversville, Fulton count}-. New 
York, born January 27, 1852, and is the 
son of Andrew and Amy A. (Sweet) Bradt, 
both of whom were born in the town of 
Ephratah, Fulton county. New York, the 
former May 15, 1824, and the latter Janu- 
ary 20, 1828. They became the parents of 
nine children, hve of whom are deceased. 
The living are Charles E., Jennie S., 
Samuel E. and Laura Luella. 

Andrew Bradt is the son of Anthony J. 
and Hannah (Peek) Bradt, both natives of 
the state of New York. He was reared on 
a farm, educated in the district schools and 
at the age of seventeen commenced teaching 
in his native township, a profession he fol- 
lowed for several winters while during the 
summer seasons he worked upon the farm. 
His marriage with Miss Amy Ann Sweet was 
celebrated January 31, 1S48. Eight years 
later he came west and purchased one hun- 
dred and forty acres of land in sections 23 
and 24, De Kalb township, where he en- 



gaged in agricultural pursuits. For several 
winters he engaged in selling gloves and 
mittens to dealers in northern Illinois, pur- 
chasing his stock from the manufactories at 
Gloversville and Johnston, New York. In 
1870, in company with his son, he started a 
glo\^e factory in De Kalb Init two }ears later 
disposed of his interest. He was the first man 
to introduce glove making northwest of Chi- 
cago and the first to sell them in the same 
territor}-. A local preacher in the Method- 
ist Episcopal church, he has been instru- 
mental in building it up in De Kalb. He is 
a man of sterling worth, well know-n and 
highly honored by all. 

Charles E. Bradt, our subject, grew to 
manhood in De Kalb county, and received 
his primary education in the district schools. 
He later attended the Northwestern Univer- 
sity, at Evanston, Illinois, where he com- 
pleted his school life. After leaving school 
he succeeded his father in business, and in 
1872 formed a co-partnership with M. D. 
Shipman, which relation still continues. 
For more than a quarter of a century they 
have been engaged in the manufacture of 
gloves and have a extensive business 
throughout the Northwest, emplo}-ing at 
certain seasons several traveling salesmen. 
With Mr. Shipman, he is also engaged in 
the manufacture of delivery wagons, under 
the firm name of Shipman & Bradt. This 
business has grown to quite extensive pro- 
portions and has been fairl}- profitable in 
their hands. 

On the 4th of September, 1885, Mr. 
Bradt was united in marriage with Miss 
Alice K. Hopkins, a native of De Kalb 
county and a daughter of Thomas M. and 
Julia A. (Hawken) Hopkins, the former a 
native of Washington county. New York, 
and the latter of St. Louis, Missouri. Her 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



father was for many years a well known 
attorney in De Kalb, but is now deceased. 
Mr. Bradt is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church of De Kalb, and is one of 
the official board. He is quite active in 
church work, and is a firm belie\-er in the 
Christian religion. Fraternally he is a Mason, 
a member of the blue lod.i^e at De Kalb, 
of the Knight Templars at Sycamore, and the 
Mystic Shrine at Chicago. Politically he is 
a Republican, and has been a member of 
the city council, taking an active interest in 
its proceedings, and working for the best 
interests of the city which has so long been 
his home. He has also served as a mem- 
ber of the school board, taking great inter- 
est in educational affairs. As a citizen he 
is thoroughly progressive, ready at all times 
to do his full share in advancing the mater- 
ial interests of his chy and county. 



CHARLES C. POND, who is engaged in 
the insurance business at Sycamore, 
traces his ancestr\' back to early colonial 
days. The first known of the family in 
America was Samuel Pond, of Windsor, Con- 
necticut. His son, Samuel, the earliest an- 
cestor of our subject positively known, is 
supposed from a number of corroborating 
circumstances to be the second of his chil- 
dren. The latter had a son born in 1679. 
whom he also named Samuel. The next in 
line was Philip, born in 1706, whose son, 
Daniel, born in 1726. was known as the pa- 
triarch because of his large family of seven- 
teen children, the greater number of whom 
grew to maturity. He moved with his en- 
tire family to Poultney, X'ermont, when that 
region was a wilderness, and there acquired 
a fine estate. Pond Hill, near the place, be- 
ing named in his honor. William Pond, the 



son of Daniel, born in 1763, married Ruth 
Wood. He served in the Revolutionary 
war, and died in 1S38. Harry Pond, son 
of William, was born in Lenox, Berkshire 
county, Massachusetts, in 1798, and re- 
moved with his father's family to Poultney, 
Vermont, where he died. He married Lo- 
vina HoUembeak, a native of Ticonderoga 
county. New York. Their son, Americus 
H. Pond, was born in Crawford county, 
Pennsylvania, January 30, 1831, and finished 
his education in Grand River Institute in 
Ashtabula county, Ohio. 

In 1 85 1, Americus H. Pond came west 
and located m Genoa township, where he 
began life for himself. During the first win- 
ter he taught school for eighteen dollars per 
month, a sum that seems paltry to teachers 
of to-day. For a number of years he rented 
land, it seeming almost impossible for him 
to get a substantial start in life. He bought 
his first land in 1S59, a tract of one hundred 
and twenty acres, which he sold in 1865 
and bought his present farm, which now 
consists of nearly three hundred acres of the 
finest land in northern Illinois. He is a 
man of whom all speak in the highest terms 
of praise, and has frequently been urged to 
represent his district in the house or state 
senate, but prefers to be a private citizen. 
He married Amy HoUembeak, a daughter 
of Ruloff and Electa fAmest HoUembeak. 
The wedding ceremony was performed Jan- 
uary 24, 1852. Ruloff HoUembeak was the 
son of Abram HoUembeak, whose father was 
one of three brothers who came from Hol- 
land in colonial days. 

Charles C. Pond is the oldest son of 
.\mericus H. and Amy Pond, and was born 
in Sycamore township, De Kalb county, Illi- 
nois, December 24, 1836. His parents re- 
moved to Genoa township, three years later. 



THE BIOCiRAPHICAL RECORD. 



273 



where he was reared and attended the dis- 
trict schools, which was followed by a course 
in the Sycamore schools, and one year in 
Rock River Seminary at Mt. Morris, Illinois. 
After completing hi; studies he taught school 
for five winters, working on a farm the re- 
maining seasons of the year. 

On the 30th of September, 1880, Mr. 
Pond was united in marriage with Miss 
Rosetta Harned, a native of Mayfield town- 
ship, De Kalb county, and a daughter of 
Edmund B. Harned, born in Smithtown, 
Suffolk count\-, Long Island, July 13, 1S29. 
He was the son of Hosea Harned, also a 
native of Smithtown, Long Island, born in 
1798, and who married Rosetta Brown, a 
native of the same place, born in 1799. 
Jacob Harned, the father of Hosea, was 
born in Perth Amboy, New Jersey, and soon 
after the Revolutionar)- war settled on a 
tract of one thousand acres of land, on 
Long Island, where his family was born. 
He died there in 1824, when about seventy- 
five years old. The name was originally 
Harne, but the spelling was changed by the 
addition of the letter d. Hosea Harned, in 
1832, moved with his family to Ohio, by 
way of the Hudson river, from Sandy Hook 
to Troy, thence by canal to Buffalo, and 
lake to Ohio. He settled in Geauga county, 
but in 1 85 I came to Illinois. 

Edmund B. Harned married Susan Siv- 
wright, a native of Nova Scotia, born Jan- 
uary 6, 1833, and a daughter of James iVI. 
Sivwright, born in Windsor, Nova Scotia, 
in 1778. and who died at the age of seven- 
ty-four years. He emigrated to the States 
in 1844, and located in Mayfield township, 
De Kalb county. Illinois. He was the son 
of James Sivwright, a native of Scotland, 
born near Aberdeen, and who ser\'ed in the 
British army against the Americans and was 



in the battle of Hunker Hill. He remained 
in America after the war, and married 
Susan Dalrymple, a native of northern Ire- 
land, v.-hose family were originally from 
France. She died at the age of one hun- 
dred and five years. James M. Sivwright 
married Prudence Eaton, a native of Nova 
Scotia, born in 1806, and a daughter of 
Da\-id and Eunice (Wells) Eaton. 

Soon after his marriage, Mr. Pond re- 
moved to Sycamore, where he engaged in 
the jevvelr}' business for six years, having as 
partners at different times, Messrs. Bacon, 
Warren and Meeker. In the spring of 1888 
he sold his jewelry stock, and in the fall of 
the same year began a successful career in 
the insurance business. For about eight 
years he was a special agent adjusting 
claims through Illinois and Iowa, at the 
same time conducting a local office in Syca- 
more. On the 1st day of May, 1898, here- 
tired from the adjusting business, and has 
since given his entire time to the Sycamore 
office, representing many of the most sub- 
stantial tire insurance companies doing busi- 
ness in this state. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Pond two children 
have been born, Ethel C. and Amy S. 
Mrs. Pond is a devoted member of the Con- 
gregational church. Fraternally he is a 
Mason and holds membership with the 
blue lodge, chapter and commander) at 
Sycamore. He is also a member of the 
Modern Woodmen of America. In politics 
he is a Republican. 



EDWARD M. DELANA, of Cortland, 
Illinois, is a business man of recognized 
ability, and the owner of four large cream- 
eries, which use the product of many farm- 
ers and which turn out a large amount of 



2/4 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



butter and cheese that finds a read}' sale in 
Chicago and other markets. He is a na- 
tive of St. Charles, Kane county, Illinois, 
born July 20, 1850, and is the son of Pat- 
rick and Henrietta (Keegani Delana, both 
natives of Ireland, and who were the par- 
ents of five children, one of \\honi, Thom- 
as, is now deceased. The living are Mar}-, 
lames H., William and Edward M. The 
father came to the United States from Ire- 
land at an early day and located first in the 
village of St. Charles, Illinois, and after- 
wards removed to a farm where our subject 
was born and reared, receiving his educa- 
tinn in the common schools. 

In his }'outh Mr. Delana learned the but- 
ter and cheese trade, with which he has 
since been connected and in which he has 
been quite successful. In June, 1887, he 
was united in marriage with Miss Ella 
Keenan, a native of De Kalb county, by 
whom he has bad two children. Edward and 
Ceorge. 

The family are members of the Catho- 
lic church, and in politics he is a Democrat. 
He has ser\ed as school director and 
trustee. He is a man that is esteemed, 
not atone by the friends and neighbors 
around him. but also by his employees in 
the various factories, and the public in gen- 



RE \\ \\ I L L I A M HU T C H I X S O N 
SMITH, pastor of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, Genoa, Illinois, was born 
four miles from Rome, in the town of \\'est- 
ern, Oneida county. New York, June 16, 
1S29, and is the son of Edward B. Smith, 
born in W'hitestown, Chautauqua count}-. 
New York, and the grandson of ^^'illiam 
Smith, who married Lydia Cleghorn. On 



the 26th of October, 1825, Edward B. 
Smith married Harriet Hutchinson, born 
Ma}- 7, 1S04, and a daughter of Dr. Zenas 
Hutchinson, who was president of the first 
medical society formed in New York and 
who removed from that state to Connecticut. 
He was born November 21, 1770, at Leba- 
non. Connecticut, and was the son of Paul 
and Susanna (Sprague) Hutchinson. The 
wife of Dr. Zenas Hutchinson was Eannie 
Smith, born in Scotland, September 17, 
1780, and a daughter of Tyler Smith. 

The subject of this sketch lived in his 
native county, until 1850, in the meantime 
attending the district schools, and later 
spending two }-ears in the Rome Academy. 
He then taughtschooloneterm and in March, 
1850, came west to Hillsdale county, Mich- 
igan, where he remained about si.\ months 
and from there went to Branch county, 
south of Coldwater, and later spent eighteen 
months at Adrian and the sanie length of 
time at .Allegan, Michigan. While at Ad- 
rian, on the 4th of May, 1853, he married 
Mary Elizabeth St. John, a native of Pal- 
myra, New York, and daughter of Rev. 
Marshall St. John, of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church, a native of \'ermont, who died 
in 1852 at the age of forty-five years. His 
wife was Mary Catherine Brodock, a native 
of Pennsylvania. Of their four children 
Mrs. Smith was first in order of birth. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Smith ten children have been 
born. Willard Marshall is an attorney re- 
siding in La Salle, Illinois. Ida Z. at home. 
Seymour E. resides at Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. Charles Anderson died at the age 
of one year. Cornelia E. is a teacher in 
the public schools of Richmond, Ilbnois. 
Harriet H. is a teacher at Austin, Illinois. 
.Morris S. is with Barnard & Co., Chicago. 
He married Nellie Keifer, and they have 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



275 



two children, Paul and Ruth. Albert G . 
married Gertrude Lytle, and they reside at 
Palatine, Illinois. Grace C. married Frank 
T. Parsons, and their children are Wintield 
and Donald. They reside at Williams' Bay, 
Wisconsin. Frank A. married Nellie Julian 
and they have one child, Kenneth. 

In the fall of 1855, Mr. Smith went to 
Aurora, where he worked at the carpenter's 
trade for a short time and then secured rail- 
road work at Galesburg, but retained his 
home in Aurora for two years. In the fall 
of 1857 he went to Lee county, Illinois, on 
a farm near Mulligan's Grove, and taught 
school at W^est Brooklyn. In 1858 he was 
licensed as a minister in the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, and in the fall of 1859, joined 
the Rock River conference. He was first 
stationed at Polo, Illinois, and from there 
went to Fulton City. In the fall of 1862. 
he became captain of the Seventy-fifth Illi- 
nois "Volunteer Infantry, the regiment being 
assigned to the .Army of the Cumberland. 
It was in various engagements, first at Nash- 
ville, with General Porter, and then at Stone 
River, Lookout Mountain, Chickamagua, on 
the march from Chattanooga to Blue Springs, 
in the battle of Dalton, and also at Buz- 
zard's Roost. Ha\"ing contracted a severe 
cold, he was discharged after eighteen 
months' service and returned to his home. 

By the Rock River conference he was 
assigned to Dixon, Illinois, and later sent 
to Aurora, where he took charge of Jennings 
Seminary. Leaving that institution he ac- 
cepted a charge at Newark, Kendall coun- 
ty, and the following year was at Sandwich. 
In the fall of 1866 he went to Polo, Illinois, 
during which time he erected the church 
building at that place, and was then three 
years at Sterling. From there he went to 
La Salle, where he remained two vears, in 



the meantime buildmg a house of worship. 
After being at Mendota two years he was 
elected presiding elder and served four years. 
He was ne.xt assigned the church at De 
Kalb, where he remained one vear, and was 
then sent to Rockford for three years. From 
Rockford he went to Marengo for t\\o 3-ears, 
after which he was at Paw Paw two 3'ears, 
Hinckley two years, Richmond and Hebron 
two years, and Palatine four years, erect- 
ting a tine church at the latter place. 
In the (all of 1S96 he was assigned 
to Genoa, where he still remains. Mr. 
Smith has tine architectural talent and 
has furnished plans for the Methodist Epis- 
copal church at Oregon, Illinois, and Platt- 
ville, Wisconsin, which plans were copied 
by the church at Waterloo, Dakota. In 
politics Mr. Smith is a Republican, and fra- 
ternally is a member of the G. .\. R. post at 
Rockford, and Rock River Lodge, No. 612, 
at Sterling, Illinois. As a minister of the 
gospel he has been very successful and in- 
strumental in bringing many souls into the 
kingdom of Christ. 



TOLL W. CLARK, proprietor of the 
J Malta Hotel, Malta. Illinois, was born 
in Clarksburg, Massachusetts, January 9, 
1837, and is the son of Benjamin ^^'. and 
Lovina (Ketchum) Clark, both also nati\es 
of Clarksburg, Massachusetts, the former 
being the son of Saley Clark, of the same 
place. The Clarks were numbered among 
the first settlers in Massachusetts, and were 
prominent farmers in that part of the state 
in which they lived. They are of English 
e.xtraction. Saley Clark in particular was 
a man of wide intiuence, the very town in 
which he was born taking its name from 
hini. He served in the state legislature of 



2/6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Massachusetts where his abihts' was lecofj;- 
nized by all. 

Benjamin W. Clark removed with his 
family to Illinois about 1858, locating in 
DuPage county, where the family remained 
H short time, when they removed to De 
Kalb county, where the father died in 1863, 
at the age of fifty-two years, his wife snr- 
\'i\ing him many years, dying in 1890, at 
the age of seventy-four years. They were 
both members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and were loyal to the- Master's 
cause. They were the parents of five 
children, n[ whom four are yet living. 
He also served in the legislature of Massa- 
chusetts. 

Joel W. Clark spent his boyhood in his 
native town and count}', and in its pub- 
lic schools received his education. He re- 
mained at home until fifteen years of age, 
at which time he came west to DuPage 
county, Illinois, where his uncle, Levi 
Ketchum, then resided, and with whom he 
lived three years. This was previous to 
the removal of his parents. It was in 
1856, during the Fremont and Buchanan 
campaign, that he removed to De Kalb 
county, where he remained until 1865, and 
then went to Lee county, where he pur- 
chased eighty acres (of land, to which he 
soon added an additional seventy acres, all 
of which was in a good state of cultivation. 
On that farm he resided until March, 1898, 
when, in partnership with his nephew, L. 
Clark, he took possession of the Malta 
Hotel, buying out \\'illiam Vanarchdale. 
Mr. Clark repaired and remodeled the house, 
putting in new furniture and renovating it 
from garret to cellar, making it neat and 
comfortable, one in which the tra\-e1ing 
public can take delight. 

Mr. Clark has been twice married, his 



first umon being with Miss Maria Ketchum, 
daughter of Jesse and Sarah Ketchum, and 
they were united January 9, 1858. She 
was born in DuPage county. By this union 
there were three children: Orian L. , born 
|uly 19, i860, died September 26, 1861; 
\^'alter C, born June 22, 1867, died March 
5, iS/j; Lulu M., born July 24, 1878, is yet 
living. On the 2 2d of March, 1895, he was 
joined in marriage with Miss Lizzie John- 
ston, daughter of John and Ann Johnston, 
and by this union there is one child, Helen 
Lovina, born February 2, 1896. Mrs. 
Clark comes of a long-lived race, her 
grandparents now Ining at the advanced 
age of one hundred and five years in the 
north of Ireland are hale and heartw 



HENRY WORE, a veteran of the war 
for the Union, who for three years 
served his adopted country faithfulh', as a 
member of the One Hundred and Fifth 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, now resides 
upon a fine farm of four hundred and forty- 
six acres of well-improved land in section 
25, Franklin township. He is a native of 
Norfolk, England, born February 3, 1837, 
and is the son of \\'illiam and Mary Worf, 
both of whom were also natives of Norfolk, 
England. They were the parents of eleven 
children, Cieorge, William, John, James, 
Abraham, Henry, Isaac, Charles, Maria, 
Sophia and Sarah. Of these all are de- 
ceased save \\'illiam, Abraham, Henry and 
Sophia. 

The boyhi)od and youth of our subject 
was spent in his native land, where he re- 
ceived a very limited education. With a 
desire to better his condition in life, he con- 
cluded to try his fortunes in the new world, 
and in 1856 left his native land and came 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ifj 



direct to Kirkland, De Kalb county, Illinois. 
On his arrival he secured work on various 
farms and continued to be thus employed 
by the month for about six years, in the 
meantime attending the public schools dur- 
ing the winter, thus receiving a pretty fair 
education. His adopted country was now 
in the midst of a struggle for its life, and 
his sympathies being with the down-trodden 
and oppressed, he enlisted at Kingston, Illi- 
nois, August 1. 1862. in Company C, One 
Hundred and F"ifth Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry, a regiment that has a proud record 
for service in the war. \\'ith his regiment 
he was in the battles of Resaca, Atlanta, 
Mt. Hickory, Bentonville and various minor 
engagements. After the Atlanta campaign, 
his regiment was with Sherman on the 
march to the sea, and at the conclusion of 
the war was in the grand review at \\'ash- 
ington. It was discharged June 6, 1865, at 
Washington, D. C. 

After receiving his discharge, Mr. Worf 
returned to De Kalb county, and again 
worked by the month, and saving his hard 
earnings, in 1882, he purchased two hun- 
dred and si.x acres of land in Kingston town- 
ship, which he sold. His present farm 
comprises two hundred and forty acres, 
which is highly improved and one of the 
best in Franklin township. 

On the 14th of October, 1879, Mr. 
Worf was united in marriage with Miss 
Susan Zubler, a native of Pennsylvania, 
and by this union there are three children, 
Bessie, Charles and Alta. Their home life 
is a happy one. Mr. Worf still maintains 
his interest in his war record, and is now a 
member of Barnes Post, G. k. R. He 
is also a member of the Masonic frater- 
nity, holding membership in the blue 
lodge at Kingston, and in the command- 



erv at Sycamore. In politics he is an 
ardent Republican, having given his support 
to that party since his arrival in this conn- 
try. He landed here during the first presi- 
dential campaign of that party, and identi- 
fying himself with it, has continued to vote 
the party ticket. While it took him some 
years to obtain his first real start in life, 
since acquiring his first tract of land he has 
been ver}- successful, and is now numbered 
among the well-to-do and wide-awake farm- 
ers of De Kalb countw 



St 



uMUEL OUIST, contractor and builder. 
Sycamore, Illinois, forms one"' of that 
large number of citizens of Sweden \\'ho 
are among the most desirable emigrants that 
make up our cosmopolitan population. Ever 
since the first settlement made by the 
Swedes in Delaware, they have been a 
worthy factor in western civilization. Being 
thrifty and energetic, they soon become in 
sympathy with American institutions, and 
are true patriots, willing to do all thev can 
in defense of their adopted country. 

Samuel (.}uist was born near the town 
of Swengungen, Sweden, October 8, 1850, 
and is the son of Swenig and Annette (An- 
derson) Quist, both of whom were natives 
of the same country, the father being born 
in 181 I. He came to America a few years 
after our subject, with whom he now makes 
his home. Swenig and Annette Quist were 
the parents of four sons and four daughters. 
The paternal grandfather was Gus Nelson, 
who after service in the arm_\' in a war with 
Germany was given the surname of Quist, 
which has since been the family name. 

In his native country our subject grew 
to manhood and attended the parochial 
schools between the ages of seven and four- 



278 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



teen, at which time he was contirtne<l in tht 
Lutheran church. From fifteen to twenty- 
one he worked on his father's farm. As 
soon as he arrivori at matiirit\ he Heter- 
mined to emigrate to America, and there- 
fore sailed from Gothburg, Sweden, for 
Hull, England, crossed to Liverpool and 
sailed for New York, landing in that cit}' 
the later part of April, 1871. From New 
York he came directly west and secured 
work for fi\-e months on a farm in Cook 
county, Illinois. Soon afterwards he went 
to Chicago to learn the trade of car- 
penter, and there worked for three years. 
He then came to Sycamore, Illinois, and 
for nine* years worked for Jacob Deiley, 
and then entered into partnership with him, 
which was continued for two years and then 
dissolved. For the succeeding two years he 
was in partnership with his brother, John 
Lunquist, and\\'illiam Anderson. He then 
bought Mr. .\nderson's interest, but re- 
mained two years longer in partnership with 
his other partner. In 1894 that copartner- 
ship was dissolved, since which time our 
subject has carried on the business alone. 
Since 1875 Mr. Quist has been constantly 
engaged at his trade, and on the greater 
number of fine buildings in Sycamore he 
was either employed or acted as contractor 
and builder. He has now a well equipped 
shop with steam power, circular and band 
saws, and turning lathes, molding machines, 
etc. He is prepared to do the finest inside 
and outside work, and employs from fifteen 
to tliirty men. 

On the 3d of July, 1877, Mr. Ouist was 
united in marriage at Sycamore, with Miss 
Ida Boline, born in Smolen, Sweden, and 
who came to America in 1869 with her two 
brothers, sailing from Copenhagen in .Au- 
gust, by way of Hull and Liverpool, Eng- 



land, to Xrw ^'urk. She is the daughter 
of Swen M. Boline, who married Guenella 
Peterson, a daughter of Pierre and Dorthea 
(Anderson) Peterson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ouist live in a beautiful 
home erected by himself, on corner of Lo- 
cust and Ottawa streets in the fall of 1886. 
They are both members of the Swedish 
Lutheran church, and in politics he is a 
Republican, and fraternally a member of 
the Modern ^^'oodmen of America. As a 
citizen he is enterprising and stands high 
in the estimation of his fellow citizens. 



JOHN F. SHOOP is one of the enter- 
prising farmers of Malta township, and 
resides on section 22, where he has a highl_\' 
productive farm. He was born in Pierce 
township, De Ka!b county, Illinois, Feb- 
ruary 6, 1857, and is the son of Solomon 
and Catherine (Eberly) Shoop, both natives 
of Pennsylvania, but of German descent. 
They were married in Pennsylvania, where 
they resided for a number of years and 
where the husband and father engaged in 
tilling the soil, the family being held in high 
esteem by their fellow citizens. In 1848 
they removed west, locating in Pierce town- 
ship, De Kalb county. Illinois, where he 
purchased one hundred and sixt}' acres of 
land in its natural state. This land he 
impro\ed by the erection of substantial 
buildings and outhouses and in due time 
had as good a farm as was in the township. 
To his first purchase he added one hundred 
and sixty acres in addition, which he dis- 
posed of in a few years, but retained his 
original farm. Solomon and Catherine 
Shoop were members of the German Evan- 
gelical church, and stood well in the esteem 
of the community, dying at a ripe old age. 




JOHN F. SHOOP. 




MRS. J. F. SHOOP. 



TH1<: IHOGRAPHICA!. REv\)R!' 



the former at Pierceville, De Kalb count}", 
in March, 1886, and the latter at Hinckley, 
February 28, 1892. They were the par- 
ents of twelve children, nine of whom grew 
to maturity, and eight of the number now 
living. 

John F. Shoop N\as se\'enth in carder of 
birth and grew to manhood on the old farm 
in Pierce township, receiving his education 
in the schools of Piercesille. He remained 
at home until he reached his majority, 
when he engaged in farming at various 
points in the cnnnt}-. He was married in 
October, 1882, to Miss Margaret W'ende- 
berg, who was born at Pierceville, Illinois, 
December 10, i8fio, and the daughter of 
George and Elizabeth Wendeberg. Ry 
this union one son has been born, Elmer J., 
April 14, 1887. 

In 1882 Mr. Shoop removed t.) Malta 
township, where he rented land for one 
year, and then purchased eighty acres of 
improved land on which he resided six 
years and which he worked in a profitable 
manner. Having a chance to sell and 
make a good prcjtit on his investment he 
disposed of that farm and purchased a larger 
one adjacent to the village of Malta, con- 
taining one hmidred and sixty-three and 
a half acres, on which he now resides. 

Mr. and Mrs. Shoop are active members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church in which 
he has held the office of trustee and steward 
very acceptably for a number of years. 
They are both alive to every christian work 
and never hesitate to do their dut\' in ad- 
vancing the Master's cause. A good farm- 
er, a loyal citizen and an obliging neighbor, 
Mr. Shoop has been honored with several 
township offices, which he has conscien- 
tiously filled to his own credit and the peo- 
ple's good. 



HEK.MAX C. EOS.SMAN, a dau-yman 
residmg on De Kalb avenue. Syca- 
more, was born in .Vnclam, province of 
Pomerania, Germany, January i i, 1852, and 
is the son of Adolph Eossman, also a native 
of Pomerania, Germany. From the age of 
six years, until fourteen years old, he at- 
tended the public schools in his natixe vil- 
lage, and then went to sea and for sixteen 
years was a sailor on the ocean and sailed 
all o\-er the known "lolir in ever\' continent 



\isiting all 
Chma! Jap; 



>unt 



the Indies. Africa, North and 
South .\merica, the Mediterranean coast, 
White Sea, in Arctic waters, and in Iceland. 
During this time he ser\-ed bis three years 
in the- German na\-v, acquitting himself 
with credit. In 1SS2 lie quit the sea and 
worked one year with Ins father on a small 
lioat on the Peeiie river in German^'. In 
iXS^ he left his native land for America, 
and in due time landed at New York, from 
which place he came to Sycamore, where a 
brother and an uncle had previousls' located. 
P\5r twehe years he worked in the canning 
factory at Sycamore, five years oi which 
time he was employed as foreman. Resign- 
ing his position in the factory, he established 
his present business as milk dealer, pur- 
chasing from the farmers and retailing 
throughout the city. He began in a small 
wa}', but by his fair dealing his business 
rapidly increased, and he now runs two 
wagons, disposing of eighty gallons of milk 
per day. 

Mr. Eossman was married in .Anclam, 
Pro\ince of Pomerania, Germany. March 
24, 18S2, to Miss Bertha .•\rndt. who was 
also born in that village and a daughter of 
John and Mary ( Arndt) Arndt, both of whom 
spent their entire li\'es in the old countrv. 
Of the five children born to our subject and 



284 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RfXORD. 



wife, William, who is his father's helper in 
the rnilk business, was born in German}'. 
Frank, George, Anna and Emma were born 
ill Sycamore. Mr. and Mrs. Lossman were 
reared in the Lutheran faith, but are now 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
at S\camore. Fraternally he is a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd F"ellows, 
and Modern Woodmen of America. In pol- 
itics he is a Republican. Thrifty, enter- 
prising and energetic, he has been fairly 
successful since coming to Sycamore, and 
now owns a neat residence at the west end 
of De I\.alb avenue, with a good outfit of 
wagons, horses, etc., necessary for the 
transaction of his business. 



MALCOLM McMURCHY, the present 
supervisor of South Grove township, 
is a fairly well known citizen of the county 
and is a practical farmer, one who has made 
a success of his chosen vocation. He was 
born in Kane county, Illinois, No\ember 3, 
1850, and is the son of Malcolm and Jean- 
nette (Renwick) McMurchy, both of whom 
were natives of Scotland and who were the 
parents of six children, as follows: Daniel, 
Walter, John, Malcolm, Mary and Agnes. 
Malcolm McMurchy, Sr. , was reared in 
his native land and there learned the car- 
penter's trade, an occupation which he fol- 
lowed exclusively while yet residing in his 
nati\-e land. In an early day he crossed 
the ocean to Canada, and in 1845 came to 
Kane counts- and there worked at his trade. 
On the 2qth of March, 1842, he married 
Jeannette Renwick. a daughter of \\'alter 
Ren\\ick, both of whom were nati\i s nf 
Scotland. William Renwick, the paternal 
great-grandfather of our subject, was a na- 
tive of Dumfriesshire, Scotland, and was 



also a farmer by occupation. He emigrated 
to America with his family and in De Kalb 
county, Illinois, engaged in fiirrning, a vo- 
cation at which he continued until his death 
at the age of eighty years. Malcolm Mc- 
Murchy, Sr. , came to De Kalb county in 
1850, and located on his farm where our 
subject now resides in 1863, and there died, 
February 14, 1865, at the age of sixty years. 
The subject of this sketch grew to man- 
hood on his father's farm and has made farm- 
ing his life w(jrk. He received a common- 
school education and by reading and obser- 
vation has since become a well-informed 
man. He has a farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres, the old McMurchy homestead, 
which he has well impro\'ed and kept under 
the highest state of cultivation. He is quite 
prominent in his township and for three 
terms served as road c jnimissioner, and in 
the spring of 1898 was elected supervisor of 
his township. In politics he is a thorough 
Republican and has voted with that party 
since attaining his majorit\-. Fraternally 
he is a Mason, holding membership with 
the lodce at Creston. 



JAMES M. ORPUT, wagon-maker and 
tank-builder, Malta, Illinois, was the 
first man to transact business in the village 
and one of its first settlers, building the 
first house in Malta in September, 1856. 
He is a natne of Homer township, Loraine 
county, Ohio, born December 8, 1824, and 
is the son of Richard and Reliefie ('Hatch) 
Orput, the former a native of \"irginia and 
the latter of New Y<}rk. They removed to 
Illinois in 1837, arriving in De Kalb county 
October 8 and stopping over night on the 
prairie between what is now Sycamore and 
South Gro\-e. Thcv lost the trail and dark- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



28: 



ness set in and were obliged to wait for the 
coming day. In their compan\ was a man 
who had been there the year previous, and 
when daylight came he recognized Orput 
Grove a short distance away, it having been 
purchased the previous year by Mr. Orput 
but had not been occupied, \^'ith his fam- 
ily he settled at Orput Grove, but two years 
later returned to Ohio, for the benefit of his 
health and there died about 1840. His 
family remained at the (~iro\e until 1S50 
when the sons began to separate and pro- 
vide for themselves. 

On leaving home our subject learned the 
wheelwright and carpenter's trade, and in 
1852 he married Miss Almira Krill, a daugh- 
ter of James and Susan Krill, by whom he 
had three children, Charles, Frank and 
Nelson. In the spring of 1856 he removed 
to Malta and engaged in the grain business. 
At this time he was the owner of eight hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land in He Kalb 
county, some of which lie worked in ad(ii- 
tion to carrying on the grain business. 
About this time his wife became seriously 
ill with an incurable malady which was a 
heavy e.xpense to him. In i860 his three 
children were stricken and died, two (if 
them, Charles and Frank, within nine days 
of each other, while Nelson died six months 
months previously His wife followed 

December 28, 1861, aged twenty-six years. 

While engaged in the grain business the 
Civil war broke out, causing a depreciation 
in value, by which Mr. Orput lost some 
twenty-two thousand dollars. This loss, 
combined with the loss of his lainih-, and 
the expense necessarily attached to it, caused 
him to fail financialU', but he jet remained 
an honest man. His large tract of land 
was sold to meet the demands of creditors. 
He continued, however, in the grain business, 



buying and selling, and trying in every way 
to earn an honest dollar. 

In 1863 Mr. Orput married Miss Maria 
Rogers, who was born in 1840 and the 
daughter of Richard Rogers, and to them 
three children were born, James M., 
Kittle and Grace. In 1876 Jame.s M., 
and Kittle, died within three months of 
each other. In February, 1880, Mrs. Maria 
Orput died and in May, 1888, Mr. Orput 
married Mrs. Elizabeth Trowbridge, widow 
of Charles Trowbridge. 

Mr. Orput continued in the grain busi- 
ness until 1870, since which time he has been 
engaged in his present line. He is of an 
inventive turn of mind and in\ented a har- 
vesting machine which he secured by letters 
patent in 1859. In 187J he patented an 
e([ualizer on a wagon, which he improved 
one year later. In 1879 he invented an- 
other equalizer, in no wa\- related to the 
first, both of which proved practical. In 
1S84 he patented a road scraper. He is 
also the inventor of many other de\'ices 
which are both novel and us-ful. He owns 
his own workshop and the dwelling in which 
he lives. No man is held in higher esteecn 
b\- his fellow citizens, and notwithstanding 
his reverses he looks young at the age of 
se\'ent3'-four years. 



GEORGE H. STANLEY, who after 
years of arduous labor upon the farm 
is now living retired in the village of Genoa, 
was born in the town of Smyrna, Chenango 
county. New York, August 39. 1829. His 
father. Dyer D. Stanley, was born in Os- 
wego county, New York, .■August 3, 1805. 
He was a farmer all his life, and in 1845 
emigrated to Illinois, and later retired from 
active work, making his home with our sub- 



286 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ject, until his death, March g, 1890, in his 
eighty-filth year. He was the son of Dver 
1). Stanley Sr.. who married a Miss Haw- 
ley, from Cherry X'alley, New York. The 
Stanleys are of Puritan ..irijiin. the rirst of 
the name coming o\er in the Mayflower. 
Dyer D. Stanley, the father of our subject, 
married Belinda Pease, a native of Enfield, 
Hartford county, Connecticut, born August 
15, 1807, and who died at our subject's 
home in Genoa, January 31, 1887. When 
quite young, her parents moved to Madison 
county. New York, where she grew to 
womanhood. She was the daughter of Jesse 
and Abigail (Earned) Pease, both of Holland 
descent. Her mother died in March, 1857. 
To Dyer D. and Belinda Stanley eight 
children were born as follows; Mrs. Melissa 
Henry, living in Carroll county, Missouri; 
George H.. our subject; Eero\- J., living in 
Antelope county, Nebraska; Thomas, of 
Topeka, Kansas; Mrs. Abigail \Miite, of 
Antelope count)', Nebraska; Newton H., 
who was killed in the battle of Eittle Blue, 
October 2 1 , 1864; and Willis Jema)', who 
died in infanc}'. 

In his native town, Mr. Stanley lived 
until the age of sixteen years, in the mean- 
time attending the subscription schools, in 
which the teacher boarded around. In 
1845, he came west with the family, by 
canal to Buffalo, and by boat to Southport, 
driving froiri there to Belvidere, locating on 
a farm of two hundred and forty acres, in 
Spring township, Boone county. With his 
father he remained until of age, when he 
commerced learning the carpenter's trade, 
an occupation which he followed for some 
years. He began farmmg on rented land, 
in Boone county, and he continued to rent 
for six years. He then purchased a farm 
in McHenr\- counts, consisting of two hun- 



dred acres, to which he later added one 
hundred and sixty acres, gi\'ing him as fine 
a farm as any in Kdey tijwiiship. On the 
first farm, he built the house, barns and 
other outbuildings, but on the second farm 
the buildings were already erected. Both 
farms are well drained, with many rods of 
tiling, and every acre is under a high state 
of cultivation. While acti\'ely engaged in 
farming, he devoted himself principally to 
raismg grain and stock, but for some years 
was engaged in dairying, keeping about 
sixty head of milch cows. 

Mr. Stanley was married May 31, [857, 
in Tiskilwa, Illinois, to Miss Mary A. Fall, 
born near Chesterheld, Morgan county, 
Ohio, and a daughter of Moses Fall, a na- 
tive of Maine, born May 30, 1797. He 
moved to Ohio \', ith his parents when a boy 
and died there. The family later moved to 
Peoria county. He was the son of Aaron 
Fall, a soldier in the Revolutionary war, 
who saw seven jears of hard service and 
was at the fall of Quebec. Aaron Fall mar- 
ried Sallie Bickford, a native of Maine, 
who died when about sixty \-ears old, her 
husband being eighty-nine }ears old at his 
death. For a time they lived in what is 
now West Virginia, and then mo\-ed to 
Ohio, where they both died. Moses Fall 
married Eliza Briggs, born in Massachu- 
setts on the South Coast, near Long Island. 
She was a daughter of Stephen Briggs, of 
English descent, who married Zelpha Att- 
wood, a native of New England. To Moses 
and Eliza Falls seven children were born, 
three of whom are yet living — Mrs. Lucy 
Bartlett. of Sheffield, Illinois, Mrs. Sarah 
Lackey, of Stark county, Illinois, and Mrs. 
Stanley. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Stanley one son was 
born, Harvey Newton, born in Spring town- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORL\ 



jS- 



ship, Boone county, Illinois, September 23, 
1864. After attendinc; the schools of Mc- 
Henry county, he entered the hi^h school 
of Genoa, from which he was j^radaated. 
For several years he engaged in teach- 
ing, and then entered the State Normal 
School at Normal, IlHnois, where he spent 
one year and a half, after which he again 
engaged in teaching. In the spring of i8Sg 
he commenced farming in Riley township 
on a farm of one hundred and sixty acres 
where he still continues to reside. He was 
married in Genoa in November, 18SS, to 
Miss Jennie Perkins, a daughter of H. A. 
Perkins of Genoa, whose sketch appear.s 
elsewhere in this work. Four children 
have been born to them, of whom Henr)', 
the first born, is now deceased. The living 
are Frank, Howard and Harry. 

In the spring of 1884, Mr. Stanley re- 
tired from active farming, removed to Ge- 
noa, and has since been taking life easy. 
.A.t various times in his life he has been 
something of a traveler. He has found 
work for a time at various employments in 
Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, and in fact 
every state touched by the Mississippi riv- 
er. He has worked in the pineries and has 
rafted lumber. He spent one year in 
Louisiana and Mississippi working at his 
trade. In 1S59 he made a trip overland to 
Colorado. In politics he is a Prohibitionist 
and has held nearly all of the minor town- 
ship offices. Religiously he and his fam- 
ily are connected with the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. Fe\^' men have more warm 
friends than the subject of this sketch. 



J 



O H N H. L A R S O N, a native of La 
Salle county, Illinois, born February 
1847. now resides on section 3, Paw 



Paw township, De Kalb county, his farms 
consisting of five hundred and twenty acres, 
all of which is under cultivation and highly 
improved. His father, Lars Larson, was a 
native of Norway, and who there spent his 
bo\'hood and youth, coming to the United 
States a young man. He first located in 
New York, where he remained a short time, 
and then came west to La Salle county, 
Illinois, where he made a permanent loca- 
tion. He married in La Salle county Miss 
Caroline Hulverson, a native of Norway, 
who there grew to womanhood, and who 
came to this country with her mother and 
step-father. On locating in La Salle coun- 
ty Mr. Larson purchased one hundred and 
forty acres of land, and later bought thirty 
acres of timber. His first house was a 
little log shanty, ten by twelve feet, in 
which he lived while making his first im- 
provements on the place. The farm under 
his management became a well-cultivated 
place, and he there lived, dying in 1S50. 
He was one of the honored pioneers of the 
county. His wife survived him many years, 
dying in 1888, at the age of eighty-four 
}-ears. They were the parents of two sons 
and one daughter: Martha, Oliver and 
John H. 

The subject of this sketch grew to man- 
hood in La Salle county, and as the oppor- 
tunity was afforded him attended the com- 
mon schools. He remained with his mother 
until twenty years of age. with the excep- 
tion of five years just alter the mother's sec- 
ond marriage Arriving at mature years, 
he bought a tract of seventy acres, which 
was partially improved, and there farmed 
for nine years. He then purchased one 
hundred and fifty-six acres on section 3, 
Paw Paw township, comprising part of his 
present farm. The farm was an improved 



2 88 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



one, but he has greatl)- added to its \ahie 
and appearance by the erection uf a number 
of outbuildings, wind-pump, and well tiling 
the place. In 1S7S he purchased sixty 
acres adjoining. From time to time he add- 
ed to his possessions until he now has ti\e 
himdred and twenty acres uf well-improved 
land, which brings him in nnnnalh' a go(Kll\' 

On the 8th of Januarv, iS(>S. in Dodge 
count}', Minnesota, Mr. Larson was united 
in marriage with Miss Sarah Ste\enson, a 
native of Illinois, born in La Salle county, 
and a daughter of Sjur Ste\enson, a native 
of Norway and a pioneer of La Salle county. 
B_\' this union there were seven children, 
one of whom died in infancy. The living 
are ]'".d\yin, F"rank, .Mbert, Nellie, Emma 
and John. 

Politically Mr. Larson is a lifelong Re- 
publican, casting his first presidential vote 
for General Grant in 1868. He has served 
six years as commissioner of highways, and 
for twenty years was a member of the 
school board. He and his wife are attend- 
ants of the Lutheran church, in which faith 
they were both reared. They are well- 
known and highly-respected citizens of De 
I\alb count}-, where the greater part of their 
lives has been spent. 



JOHN D. McClelland, hveryman, 
whose place of business is on Fourth 
street, De Kalb, Illinois, has one of the best 
equipped establishments in the city. His 
stables are clean, well lighted, with thorough 
ventilation, and in every way comfortable. 
He was born June 8, 1847, in Kane county, 
Illinois, and is the son of George W. and 
Jane H. f\\'alker) McClelland, both natives 
of Erie, Crawford county, Penns}'lvania, 



the former born March 16, 1822, and the 
latter November 7, 1824. 

George W. McClelland was a prosperous 
farmer, and removed from Erie, Penpsyl- 
vania, to Illinois, arriving in Kane county 
NoN'ember 28, 1843, the same year in which 
he was married, and for a short time resided 
at I:)urlington, Illinois. In I 857 he removed 
with his famih' to Kingston, De Kalb county, 
where he purchased a farm of one hundred 
acres, eight)' acres of which was in prairie 
and the remainder in timber. This place 
he improved, erecting on it suitable build- 
ings and placing it under a high state of 
cuitis'ation. His death was the result of an 
accident. He was kicked by a horse and 
died August 12, 1873. His widow and four 
out of a family of five children survi\'e hmi. 
Their names are John D., Sarah J., McCol- 
lom, Tina A. and George A. Fraternally, 
he was a nieniber of the Masonic order and 
b\' that order his funeral services were con- 
ducted. He was a man held in high esteem 
b\' all who knew him, respected for his in- 
trinsic worth, a loving father, an affectionate 
husband and a loyal citizen. 

John I). McClelland, our subject, was 
reared and educated in Kingston township, 
alternating between the farm and the school 
rooni imtil he reached his majority. He 
lived at honie until about 1876, when he 
turned his attention to \arious pursuits, 
which he followed for about ten years. In 
I 886 he removed to De Kalb, where he en- 
gaged in the livery business, forming a part- 
nership with George Holmes, whose interest 
he purchased the same year. Soon after, 
however, he formed a partnership with M. 
Hanrahan and in 1 888 sold his interest to Mr. 
Hanrahan. Later he and his brother George 
purchased the interest of Orlando Carter in 
his livery business on Third street, where 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



289 



they continuLd four years with marked suc- 
cess. At the expiration of this time he pur- 
chased his brother's interest and continued 
the business alone in that location for one 
year. He then purchased a lot on Fourth 
street, on which he erected suitable barns 
to accommodate his rapidly increasins; busi- 
ness. 

On the /th of December, 1894, Mr. Mc- 
Clelland was united in marriage with Miss 
Mollie Starks, a daughter of James and Sarah 
Starks. They have nosv one child, Reed, 
born December 11, 1897. Politically Mr. 
McClelland is a Republican and fraternally a 
member of the Knights of Pythias. He is 
an excellent judge of horses, and has some 
of the finest and most stylish rigs to be 
found in the city. He is a genial and court- 
eous gentleman, who alwa3-s endeavors to 
please and is thoroughly acquainted with his 
business. 



w 



TLLIAM H. KEENE, who resides on 
section 4, Victor township, but who 
is practically living a retired life, came to 
De Kalb county in the spring of 1849. He 
was born March 4, 1820, in Esperance, 
Schoharie county. New York, and is the 
son of Bartholomew Keene, a native of 
Gilderland, New York, who was a nail- 
maker b\' trade, but who followed the occu- 
pation of farming for a short time, and who 
for a period of eighteen years and four 
months kept the toll bridge across the 
Schoharie river at Esperance. Bartholo- 
mew Keene was married three times, his 
first wife living but a short time. He then 
married Fanny \'an Schoover, who was the 
mother of our subject, and after her death 
he married Esther Slingerland. Bartholo- 
mew Keene came west m the winter of 



1843, coming through Canada and Chicago 
to the Fox river in Kane county. There 
our subject rented a farm of one hundred 
and sixt)' acres, on which he lived until the 
fall of 1848. He is the only survivor of a 
family of nine children. 

In his native state, Williairi H. Keene 
grew to manhood and on the 17th of Octo- 
ber, 1848, was united in marriage with Miss 
Emily Pulver, a native of Gilderland, New 
York, and a daughter of Richard and Katie 
P.ulver. Immediately after marriage, he 
brought his bride to De Kalb county and 
purchased fort\-six acres of wild land in 
Victor township, and also a claim right of 
one hundred and sixty acres, which he later 
entered. He now has a valuable farm of 
two hundred and eighty acres, which he has 
well improved, having an excellent dwell- 
ing, two large barns, various other out- 
buildings, and is surrounded with a fine 
smooth wire fence, and well drained. 

Mr. and Mrs. Keene are the parents of 
eight children, as follows: Marcus, deceased; 
)ulia, who married S. L. Brewer, a 
farmer Ii"ing in Kansas, is now deceased; 
Martha, residing at home, and acting as 
liousekeeper for her father; George M., a 
farmer, who married Malinda Merritt, and is 
living in \'ictor township; Nanc}-, who mar- 
ried Jonathan Davis, a farmer of Victor 
township; Lewis Adelbert, living at home 
and operating the home farm; Laura, who 
married C. Clifford, who is engaged in the 
butcher business in Leland; and Louis, 
who is now deceased. 

Mr. Keene for many years has been a 
raiser of shorthorn cattle, and has now some 
of the finest in the state. He is also en- 
gaged in raising Berkshire hogs and Shrop- 
shire sheep. He generally ships his own 
stock, and in this business has been quite 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



successful. Politically, he is a Democrat, 
and has ser\-ed his township in- various local 
offices. For about eight years he served as 
road commissioner, and was school trustee 
for a number of years. He has also served 
as super\is(jr of his t(.nvnship, and durinjr one 
term of the circuit cnurt was foreman of the 
strand jurw .A stroni; temperance man, he 
has been identilied with the Good Temjilars 
for some years. 

After a happy wedded lift <A nearly hfty 
ve;irs, Mrs. Keeiie was called to her reward 
June 2X, 1898. She was a woman of excel- 
lent character, a lo\in« wift and an affec- 
tionate mother, a j^ood neighbor and a 
friend to all. Her death was sincerely 
mourned, not alone by the family but by 
many friends in De Kalb and La Salle coun- 
ties. As already stated, Mr. Keene is living 
practically a retired life. He has done his 
work well, aiding in de\eloping the county 
and state, and where known is held in high 
esteem. 



CLARK L. BARBER, deceased, was 
one of the pioneers of De Kalb coun- 
ty and a man well known throughout its 
length and breadth. He was born in the 
town of Pike, W'yonung.count)', New York, 
June 2y, 1814. His parents, Le\i C. and 
Sallie (Rood) Barber, were nati\es of \'er- 
mont, who, as pioneers, settled in Pike 
township in 1811, Levi C. Barber bought 
land of the Holland Purchase Compan}- 
four miles east of Pike Hollow, but in the 
wilderness. Here he erected a log house, 
in which our subject was born, cleared a 
farm and made considerable advancement 
toward the establishment of a coinfortable 
home, but in February, 1835, started for 
the Prairie state with horses and sleigh. 



.Arriving in De Kalb county, he took a 
claim on section 15, of what is now De 
Kalb township. He was accompanied by 
his two eldest sons, Lyman and Henry, 
who also took claims, and afterwards en- 
tered entered the land when the Govern- 
ment had surveyed it and ph'.ced it on the 
market. This was their home until the 
death of the lather, which occurred in 1859. 
He was a stirring man, full of energy and 
enterprise, and for several years served as 
sheriff of Allegany county. New York. He 
was twice married, and b\' his first wife his 
children were Lyman, Harry, Clark L., 
Amelia, Pollie and Adelia. The first four 
are now deceased, .\melia is the wife of 
Luman Huntley, of Dixon, Illinois. His 
second wife was Mrs. Hannah Brownwell, 
by whom he had three children. .Adelia is 
the wife of Franklin Burr, of Lincoln, Ne- 
braska, whose son, Charles C, was a mem- 
ber of the Nebraska state senate. \\'. B. 
is now a resident of De Kalb. Laura E., 
the wife of Clark Carter, is now deceased. 
Clark L. Barber, the subject of this 
sketch, grew to manhood in his native town, 
being reared to farm life. In 1836, accom- 
panied by two sisters, he started to meet 
their father in the prairie state. Leaving 
his sisters in Chicago, he made his way on 
foot fur that part of Kane count}- now in- 
cluded in De Kalb, where he met the fa- 
ther. He first made a claim one mile north 
of De Kalb on what is now called Geneva 
lake, but he abandoned it and took one on 
section 15 and 18, in what is now De Kalb 
township. Here he built a log house, hav- 
ing a chimney constructed of sticks and 
mud, making the roof with " shakes," split 
from oak timber, and the floor of pun- 
cheon. From this rude beginning he im- 
proved the place to its present fine condi- 




C. L. BARBER. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



293 



tion, the farm containing two hundred acres. 
In 1883 he sold his original farm and trav- 
eled extensively in Kansas and Nebraska. 
In Chase county, Nebraska, he purchased a 
farm of four hundred acres, and in the same 
year he bought a large farm in Irofjiiois 
county, Illinois. 

In May, 1839, Mr. Barber was united in 
marriage with Miss Mary M. Spring, a na- 
tive of New York, born Ma\- 5, 1823, and 
the daughter of Samuel and Lament Spring. 
By this union twelve children were born, 
two of whom are now living, Mrs. Jacob 
Crawford, born November \2. 1S40; and 
Mrs. Newcombe Crawford, born September 
6, 1846. 

Mr. Barber died March 12, i8y2. He 
was a man greatly esteemed and tilled sev- 
eral offices of honor and trust in both town- 
ship and county. For six years he was 
deputy sheriff, and for several years was 
assessor of De Kalb township. He was a 
Mason of high integrity and also a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



WALTER M. FORWARD, senior mem- 
ber of the firm of Forward lS: Mc- 
Guire, plumbers of Sycamore, was born at 
Brighton, Ontario, Canada, September 30, 
1855. His father, Reuben H. Forward, 
was a native of W'atertown, New 'N'ork, 
born October 24, 1823, and who moved to 
Canada about 1845, and there on the 30th 
of April, 1846, married Miss Margaret 
Spencer, a native of Brighton, Ontario, born 
March 5, 1824, and a daughter of Richard 
and Pauline (Kingsbury) Spencer, both na- 
tives of England. Richard Spencer's mother 
j was a Miss Richards, and Pauline Kings- 

; bury's mother was a Miss Otis. Richard 

' H. and Margaret Forward were the parents 



of five children, three of whom are now liv- 
ing; Imogene, wife of Joseph .\. Kemp, of 
Colburn, Canada; James \V. and Walter M. 
The father died in 1857 in Ohio while awa)- 
from home on a business trip. The mother 
died in Canada December 2, 1897. 

The subject of this sketch attended 
school in Brighton until seventeen years of 
age, and in his native town commenced 
learning the tinner's trade. In the latter 
part of August, 1872, he went to Beloit, 
Wisconsin, where he finished his trade. 
On the 6th of July, 1874, he went to Chica- 
go, in time to see the great July fire, and 
there worked in a shop on Madison street 
until November of the same year, when he 
came to Sycamore and worked for Captain 
Whittemore until August of the following 
year. Returning to Chicago, he remained 
until April, 1879, with the exception of the 
summer season of 1877, when he was em- 
ployed at South Bend, Indiana. In March, 
1S79, he went to Rockford, Illinois, where 
he remained four years and then again came 
to Sycamore, and for four years was with 
Haight Brothers. He began business for 
himself in July, 1887, being the junior mem- 
ber of the firm of Buell cS: Forward. That 
partnership continued one year, when he 
formed a partnership with Haight Brothers 
under the firm name of N\'. M. Forward lS: 
Company, that partnership existing until 
1896. Since January, 1897, he has been 
in partnership with Francis W. McGuire, 
their place of business being on Maple 
street. 

Mr. Forward was married m Sycamore, 
July 10, 1879, to Ida M. Rowley, a native 
of Sycamore, and fifth in a family of seven 
children born to Johti W. and Louisa T. 
(Beebe) Rowley. Her father was born in 
Belvidere, New Jersey, August 11, 1822, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and came to De Kalb county in 1844, lo- 
cating -at S}'camore where he en^jaged in 
his trade of carpenter and contractor. He 
was a son of Louis and Phebe (Wallace") 
Rowley, the former a native of Amsterdam, 
New York, and the latter of Scotland. 
Lewis Rowley died in 1848 at tlie age of 
eighty years. Louisa F. Beebe was a na- 
ti\e of Jefferson county. New York, and a 
daughter of John Beebe, who was born in 
Connecticut, and who married Sarah Clark, 
a daughter of John Clark, whose wife was 
a Miss Calkins. John Beebe was a son of 
John Beebe, Sr. , who married a Miss Clark, 
[ohn Beebe came west in 1844 and pur- 
chased a farm near Shabbona Gro\-e. 

To our subject and wife four children 
ha\e been born. Edward J. died at the 
age of five years. Ferd W., Harry and 
Ruth all yet reside at home. In politics 
Mr. Forward is a Republican, while he and 
his wife are members of the Congregational 
church. Fraternall\- he is a Mason and a 
member of the Modern Woodmen of .Amer- 
ica, Knights (jf Pythias, Knights of the 
Maccabees and Knights of the Globe. For 
two years he served as alderman of his 
ward, and in e\ery relation of life lie has 
shown himself an enterprising and thorough- 
going business man. 



DAVID M. GIBBS, for nearly thirty 
years a successful teacher in the pub- 
lic schools of Illinois, but now living a re- 
tired life in the village of Genoa, was born 
near Cooperstown, Otsego county. New 
York, May 5, 1839. His father, Alanson 
D. Gibbs, was born in Massachusetts, Jan- 
uary 8, 1803, and moved to Otsego county, 
New York, in boyhood and there grew to 
manhood and married Sophronia Main, a 



native of the state of New York, born April 
20, 1809, and who died March 20, 1895. 
Her father was a soldier in the war of 1812 
and was in the battle of Sackett's Harbor. 
From New York, later in life, Alanson D. 
Gibbs moved with his family to Illinois and 
purchased a farm of one hundred and 
twenty acres in Kingston township, De Kalb 
county, where his death occurred March 4, 
1885. In early life he was a Democrat, but 
on account of its free soil principles he be- 
came a Republican on the organization of 
that party. Alanson D. and Sophronia 
Gibbs were the parents of seven children. 
Eustacia is now the wife of J. S. Brown, of 
I\ingston, Illiiiois. Dewight lives in Tope- 
ka, Kansas. Benjamin S. lives in Franklin 
township, De Kalb county. David M. is 
the subject of this sketch. Parker T. is 
now living in Boone count}-, Iowa. Mercy, 
deceased, was the wife of Ozias A. Sperry, 
now of Kansas. .\mmi is a carpenter living 
in the village of Kingston, De Kalb county. 
The subject of this sketch came west 
with his parents, reaching Belvidere, Illi- 
nois, May 18, 1845. They drove through 
from Cooperstown to Utica, New York, and 
from there by canal to Buffalo, and the 
lakes to Chicago. From the latter place 
they came by team to Belvidere. The fam- 
ily lived some months near Belvidere, when 
the father bought one hundred and twenty 
acres in Kingston township. De Kalb coun- 
ty. David M. was but si.\ years of age on 
his arrival in De Kalb county, and until 
eighteen years of age attended the district 
school. He was a good student and being 
large for his age secured a school, and from 
the time he was eighteen for some years 
taught school during the winter months in 
De Kalb and Boone counties, and worked 
on farms during the summer months. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



295 



Mr. Gibbs was married January i, 1861, 
in Beividere, Illinois, to Julia .Ann Slater, 
born in Bainbridge, Chenango county, New- 
York, June 6, 1842, and a daughter of Jos- 
eph and Sallie (Silviusj Slater. The latter 
was born near Bethlehem, Northampton 
county, Pennsylvania, and a daughter of 
Henry Silvius, who married a Miss Schriv- 
er. Joseph Slater was born in \'ermont, in 
181 I, and died in 1847. When a child, he 
removed from Massachusetts to Washington 
county. New York, and later moved west- 
ward to Chenango county, where his death 
occurred. His widow later married U. S. 
Hollembeak. and removed with him to 
Boone county, Illinois, in 1852. where the 
family was reared and principally educated. 
Joseph Slater was a son of Israel Slater, 
one of the Green Mountain boys that were 
in the battle of Sackett's Harbor. By 
trade Joseph Slater was a shoemaker, but 
also acquired a knowledge of several hand- 
icrafts, being an expert mill-wright. It was 
while erecting a mill in Pennsylvania, t hat 
he met and married Sallie Salvias. His sons 
were also ingenious, and of an inventive turn 
of mind Oscar, a cooper by trade, invent- 
ed and manufactured many of the tools 
used in his trade, which enabled him to turn 
out much more work than other workmen. 
Joseph and Sallie Slater were the parents of 
six children. Lydia, deceased, married 
William .Axtell of Hamilton, Delaware coun- 
ty, New York. Almon died at the age of 
eleven years. Louisa married Seth Blood, 
and lives at Park Rapids, Iowa. Oscar is 
deceased. Julia A. is the wife of our sub- 
ject. One, an infant, died unnamed. 

In the spring following his marriage, 
Mr. Gibbs rented a farm, and for three 
years engaged in farminj^ .luring the spring 
and summer seasons, and in winter was en- 



gaged in teaching. In the fall of 1864, he 
enlisted at Marengo, Illinois, in the Thir- 
tieth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, joiningthe 
regiment in time to be with Sherman on the 
march to the sea, and in the grand review 
at Washington. He was discharged and 
mustered out at Springfield, Illinois, in 
July, 1865. 

Returning home, Mr. Gibbs continued 
farming and teaching until 1867, when he 
and his wife entered the State Normal 
School, at Normal, Illinois, taking a three 
years' course. On graduating from that in- 
stitution, both were secured to teach at 
Rosamond, Christian county, Illinois, and 
ga\-e such excellent satisfaction to an intel- 
lectual and discriminating community, that 
they were retained seven years and might 
have remained longer. In 1877 they came 
to Genoa and took charge of the schools, 
and thoroughly graded the same, and there 
remained for eight years. Patrons were 
loth to lose their services, but constant and 
conscientious work made a rest necessary. 
For two years Mr. Gibbs conducted a dairy 
farm, on a tract of fifty acres, which he owns 
adjoining the village of Genoa, after which 
they taught two years in the Kirkland 
schools. They were again prevailed upon 
to accept the Genoa schools, but after three 
years retired permanently from the profes- 
sion, which they had adorned for more than 
twenty years. They have a loving regard 
for all who have gone out from under their 
instruction, most of their graduates now till- 
ing positions of honor and trust. Among 
the number are judges, lawyers, teachers, 
electricians, bookkeepers, bankers and man- 
agers of various institutions. 

.Mr. and Mrs. Gibbs are natural-born 
teachers, both beginning at an early age. 
After their marriage they taught twenty 



296 



THi-: BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



years together in the same school, and now 
retired from active work they are taking life 
eas}'. Both are fond of music and books, 
in which they take great delight. They own 
four acres in the village, on which is a small 
fruit garden where man_\' choice varieties of 
fruit are cultivated. They yet retain their 
dairy farm of fifty acres, on the northern 
line of the village, which is occupied by a 
tenant. They are both members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, in which Mr. 
Gibbs is a local preacher of marked ability, 
often supplying vacant pulpits. Politically 
he is a Prohibitionist, though often voting 
the Republican ticket. 



CHARLES H. SALISBURY is the con- 
fidential secretary and managing ac- 
countant of Jacob Haish. The real bene- 
factors of our race, and the renowned in 
historj-, are too often distinct and separate 
characters. The pen of the historian and 
biographer loved to delineate bold and 
striking features, to dwell upon startling in- 
cidents born of the passions and impulses 
of men, leaving unchronicled those nobler 
deeds that spring from the noblest ele- 
ments of true human greatness. The hero 
of a hundred battlefields may furnish vol- 
umes for history, and his eager biographer 
gathers the material and erects to his mem- 
ory a pyramid, while noble and honorable 
men, who faithfully and well perform their 
duties, often fail to secure a conspicuous 
niche in the temple of fame. It is there- 
fore no less a duty than a privilege, when 
one has honored his calling, commanded 
the esteem and admiration of his friends 
and the respect of his enemies, to pay at 
least some tribute of respect in recording a 
few simple facts. 



The subject of this biography was born 
at Barton, \'ermont, Jul}' 23, 1841. and is 
the son of Henry and Caroline M. (Butler) 
Salisbur}-, both of English parentage. In 
1856. when but fifteen years of age, our sub- 
ject removed from the east to White Rock, 
Ogle county, Illinois, where he made a stay 
of a few months, and in the fall of the same 
\-ear came to De Kalb count}-, Illinois, his 
time being spent alternately on the farm, in 
the store and in the school room. In 1859, 
he completed his course at Professor 
Webb's Academy, but subsequently attended 
various institutions of learning, which fitted 
him for a larger field of usefulness. 

When Jacob Haish first con- menced 
business in De Kalb he employed Mr. Salis- 
bury, who remained with him until the 
winter opening of school. In the spring of 
1 86 1, he was appointed assistant postmaster 
under Ira V. Randall, and served until 
August 6, 1862, when his nation's call was 
heard, and he offered his services to his 
country. On that date he was enrolled as 
a member of Company K, One Hundred 
and Fifth Regiment Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry, and was inm-iediately appointed first 
sergeant of his company. For nearly three 
years he served his countr}-, and partici- 
pated in the battles fought from Chatta- 
nooga to Atlanta, and was in the celebrated 
march to the sea and from Savannah to 
Raleigh, North Carolina, where the main 
body of Sherman's army was encamped 
when peace v«as declared. He was never 
absent a day from the company, except on 
special duty. At frequent intervals he com- 
manded the company in important engage- 
ments, and was in full command during the 
march to the sea, and through the Caro- 
linas. For meritorious services, he was 
breveted lieutenant. He was honorably 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RKCOKD. 



29- 



discharged at Chicago, Illinois, June/, 1S65, 
after faithfully serving in one of the severest 
contests known to history. 

On receiving his discharge, Mr. Salis- 
bury returned to De Kalb, and in the win- 
ter of 1865-6 he engaged with Mr. Haish, 
who at that time was a lumber dealer, con- 
tractor and builder. From that time to the 
present, by his urbane deportment, his 
familiar, 3-et respectful address and gentle- 
manly courtesy, he has pro\'ed himself an 
indispensable factor to his employer. To 
his tact, practical experience and business 
capacity may be attributed the clock-work 
accuracy with which the Haish Manufac- 
turing Company's business has been carried 
to its present proportions. During the long 
and fiery litigation through which the Haish 
Manufacturing Compan}' passed the pen and 
pencil of our subject were frequently 
brought into requisition for ad\ertising pur- 
poses. In the draughting of cartoons and 
in his readiness to dash off burlesque poetry, 
he has had few superiors. The fight be- 
tween the different barb wire manufacturers 
was very intense, and ever\' effort was made 
by each to push his wire to the front. In 
one of his advertisements Mr. Salisbury 
says : 

" Well, perhaps you may be dreaming. 

Perhaps you're in a whirl ; 
Vet somehow Haish's fence is winning 

The plaudits of the world." 

Some of the opponents of Mr. Haish 
tried to have a little fun at his e.xpense, be- 
cause of the fact that he was a •'Dutch- 
man." In reply to this Mr. Salisbury 
writes ; 

" The June bug has gaudy wings, 

The lightning bug has fame ; 
The ' Dutchman ' has no wings at ail 

But he gets there just the same." 

These rhymes, written by Mr. Salisbury, 



which were often accompanied by cartoons, 
created great interest throughout the coun- 
try and brought the Haish barb wire into 
considerable prominence. Mdny were the 
conjectures made as to who was the writer 
of the rhymes and the draughtsman of the 
cartoons, and to this day few people know 
who was the author. 

On the I St of May, 1876, Mr. Salisbury 
was united in marriage with Miss Laura M., 
a native of Vermont, and a daughter of Oli- 
ver and Larnira Wilder. Fraternally he 
is a Mason and has attained the Knight 
Templar degree. 

Probably at no other vocation in life are 
the sterling qualities of character, the per- 
severance and stability of purpose and 
clearness and perception of mind called into 
requisition than the one which Mr. Salis- 
bury has filled and is now filling. At an 
early age he was cast upon his own re- 
sources, bus with willing hands and active 
brain, with the future illumed with hope, 
and undaunted by the difficulties which 
beset every young man on the threshold of 
life, he resolved upon making life a success. 
By virtue of those inherent and intrinsic 
qualities which are in his nature and that 
are wholly incompatible with failure, he has 
gained his present position and enjoys the 
full confidence of his employer and the 
respect of his fellowmen. 



WILLIAM R. MOON is a well-known 
farmer, residing in Franklin township, 
on a farm of one hundred and sixty acres, 
w»hich is always kept under the highest state 
of cultivation. He is a native of the town- 
ship, born on the farm where he now re- 
sides, December 26, 1852, and is the son of 
Thomas and Ellen Moon, both natives of 



igf! 



THE BIOCiRAPHICAL RECORD. 



England, and the parents of five chddren, 
[ames, John, Ann, Thomas and WilHain. 
Our subject also has one half brother, Ed- 
ward Gardner, and two half sisters, Ellen 
and Jane Moon. In his native land Thomas 
Moon learned the carpenter's trade, but, to 
his mind, the opportunities for advance- 
ment were slim, indeed. The possibilities 
of the new world were open before him, and 
he felt that in this new country he could do 
better for himself and family, and therefore, 
in 1S50, set sail tor New York, from which 
place he came direct to De Kalb county, 
Illinois, and purchased one hundred and 
sixty acres of government land, where his 
son now lives. He at once went to work 
for the improvement of the place, and in 
due time his farm was such as to compare 
favorably with those of his neighbors sur- 
rounding him. He continued to work faith- 
fullx' upon that farm until death claimed 
him at the age of tift>'-eight 3'ears. 

On the old home farm, where he was 
born, our subject grew to manhood, and 
when old enough to follow the plow or 
handle the hoe he was given his task of farm 
labor. In the neighborhood schools he ob- 
tained his education, attending principally 
in the winter months or as the opportunity 
was afforded him. On the 29th of Novem- 
ber, 1880, he was united in marriage with 
Miss Lila R. Johnson, a native of De Kalb 
county, and by this union there are two chil- 
dren, Lavun and Lula, both of whom are 
under the parental roof and students in 
the public schools. In politics Mr. Moon 
is a Republican, with which party he has 
been identified since attaining his majority. 
While he does not give as much of his time 
to the party as some others, he yet has at 
heart its best interests, believing its prin- 
ciples are for the public good. For some 



years he has been a school director, and 
has endeavored to discharge its duties faith- 
fully. Fraternally he is a member of the 
Knights of the Globe. As a farmer he is 
practical, yet ever ready to adopt any meas- 
ure that will tend to improve his place. As 
a citizen, he is held in the highest esteem, 
and has many friends in De Kalb and ad- 
joining counties. 



NATHAN S. RICHARDS has been a 
resident of Sycamore since 1855. He 
was born in the town of Marcy, Oneida 
county, New York, September 18, 1828. 
He is of Welch parentage, and is the son of 
Richard and Alice (Owens) Richards, both 
of whom were natives of Wales. The for- 
mer, who was born about 1805, came to 
.■\merica with his parents when about eight 
years old. His entire life was spent on the 
farm, and his death occurred in New York, 
in 1892. His father, William Richards, 
located on a farm in New York, where he 
died at an advanced age. His wife came 
to America when she was but a year old. 

The subject of this sketch attended the 
district schools as the opportunity was 
afforded him until the age of fourteen years. 
He worked on his father's farm until seven- 
teen years old, when he went to Waterville, 
New York, to learn the blacksmith's trade, 
and there remained about si.\ years. In 
I 85 I he came west, and located in Chicago, 
where he worked one year, going from 
thence to Jackson, Michigan, where for some 
time he was an instructor in the blacksmith 
shops of the penitentiary at that place. He 
next went to Aurora, Illinois, remained 
there a few months, and then went to Hunt- 
ley, McHenry county, and was there for 
one year. In 1855 he remo\ed to Syca- 



thf: biographical record. 



299 



more, and worked about eighteen years in 
his first shops, located near where his pres- 
ent shop stands. He built his present large, 
three-stor3' shop in 1872, and at first en- 
gaged in the manufacture of wagons, bug- 
gies and sleighs, and various farm imple- 
ments. In later years factory products have 
displaced shop work, so that most of histime 
is now spent in repair work, horseshoeing, 
etc. 

In 1854, at St. Charles, Illinois, Mr. 
Richards was united in marriage with Miss 
Ruth Baxter, a nati\e of New York, and a 
daughter of Elihn Ba.xter. She died in 
1896, at the age of sixty-eight years, lea\- 
ing three children, Mary, Lydia and Charles. 
The first named married Elzy Ferguson, a 
farmer of Mayfield township, by whom she 
has had four children, three \'et living. 
Lydia married Leonard Pierce, a farmer of 
Cortland township, and they have two chil- 
dren. Charles is a good practical black- 
smith, having his forge in Mayfield town- 
ship. Religiously, Mr. Richards is a Con- 
gregationalist and in politics, a Republican. 
Fraternally, he is a Mason of forty years 
standing. 



FRANCIS WILLIAM McGUIRE, junior 
member of the firm of Forward A. 
McGuire, plumbers of Sycamore, was born 
in Beloit, Wisconsin, August i, 1861, and 
is second in a family of seven children born 
to Edwin and Johanna (Kane) McGuire. 
The former was born in Canada, January, 
1836, and is now engaged in business in 
Rockford, Illinois. The latter was born in 
Ireland in 1839, and came to America with 
her parents in 1845. 

The subject of this sketch grew to man- 
hood in his natise citw and attended the 



grammar and high schools of Beloit, until 
the age of eighteen years, when he com- 
menced learning the tinner's trade in his 
father's shop. After completing his trade 
he remained with his father until the age of 
twenty-three years, at which lime he went 
to Omaha, Nebraska, where he continued 
to work at his trade for four years. In 
1892, he went to Rockford, Illinois, and 
there remained four )ears, coming to Syca- 
miire in 1896 and working at jonrneyman 
work from April, 1896, till Januar}-, 1897, 
when he fornied a partnership with W. M. 
Forward, in a general plumbing and tinnmg 
business, sheet metal work, etc. 

Mr. McGuire was married in Beloit, 
Wisconsin, October 15, 1887, to Miss 
Louise Beimer, a nati\'e of New Munster, 
Wisconsin, and a daughter of Rudolph and 
Christina (Elfers) Beimer, both of whom 
\\ere natives of Burgsteinford, Gerrr.any. 
The latter died in 1873. at the age of forty- 
five years, and the former in 1881, at the 
age of sixty-se\en years. They were the 
parents of twehe children, of whom Mrs. 
McGuire was tenth in order of birth. By 
occupation he was a farmer, and a hard- 
working, honest man. To our subject and 
wife four children have been born — Jessie, 
Leslie, Joseph and Clifton. 

In politics Mr. McGuire is an independ- 
ent Republican, voting the party ticket on 
all national issues, but exercising his right 
to vote for the best man regardless of party 
in local issues. Fraternally he is a member 
of the Modern Woodmen of America and 
Knights of the Maccabees, while Mrs, Mc- 
Guire is a member of the Daughters of the 
Globe. Both are highly esteemed, and 
although they have been residents of Syca- 
more but a short time, they have made 
manv warm friends. 



THE BIOr,KAPHICAL RECORD. 



JOSEPH F. GLIDDEN.— Often do we 
J liear it said of those who have attained 
distinguished honors by reason of a well spent 
and successful life that they were men who 
rose to eminence through adventitious cir- 
cumstances, and yet to such carping criti- 
cism and lack of appreciation there needs be 
made but the one statement that fortunate 
environments encompass nearl\' every man 
at some stage in his career, but the strong 
man and the successful man is he who real- 
izes that the proper moment has come, that 
the present and not the future holds his op- 
portunity. The man who makes use of the 
Now and not the To Be is the one who 
passes on the high way of life others who 
started out ahead of him and reaches the 
goal of prosperity far in advance of them. 
It is this qualit>- in Mr. Glifden that has 
made him a leader in the business world 
and wf)n him a name in connection with 
the industrial interests of the country that 
is known throughout the United States. 

The salient points in his life history are 
as follows: He was born January i8, 1813, 
in Charleston, Sullivan county, New Hamp- 
shire, his parents being David and Polly 
(Hurd) Glidden, alsi) natives of that state. 
During the infancy of our subject they re- 
mo\ed t(i a farm in Orleans countw New 
York, where they remained until iS44,when 
they emigrated westward. After a short resi- 
dence in Ogle county, Illinois, they came to 
to DeKalb county, spending the rest of their 
days in the home of their son, Joseph P., 
who rewarded them for their care of him in 
boyhood by untiring de\otion to their com- 
forts and needs. 

On the home farm in New York our sub- 
ject was reared and his ample training in 
the fields through the summer months was 
supplemented by mental training in the 



school room dining the winter season. He 
also studied algebra and the classics in addi- 
tion to the common English branches, hop- 
ing to pursue a collegiate course, but that 
plan was finally abandoned. He, however, 
studied for a time in Middlebury Academy, 
in Genesee countv, and in the seminary at 
Lima, New ^'ork. After teaching school 
for some time he returned to farming as a 
more congenial occupation and opierated 
rented land. He had no money to buy, but 
he knew that in the Mississippi valley there 
stretched acre after acre of broad prairie 
hitherto uncultivated, and with the hope of 
securing a farm of his own he came to Illi- 
nois in the fall of 1842. Leaving the Em- 
pire state he proceeded to Detroit with two 
threshing machines of primitive construc- 
tion and spent thirty days on the wheat 
farms of Michigan, operating his threshers 
with the assistance of his brother, Willard, 
and two other men. He subsequentl)' 
shipped his machines to Chicago and then 
to De Kalb county, where he followed 
threshing two years. In the winter after 
his arrival he purchased six hundred acres 
of land on section 22, De Kalb township, a 
mile west of the village, and at once began 
to develop and improve it. He still owns 
that property which he has made one of the 
finest farms in Illinois, its boundaries hav- 
ing been extended until it comprises more 
than eight hundred acres, the greater part 
of which IS under a high state of cultivation, 
while substantial buildings and other mod- 
ern accessories indicate the practical and 
progressi\'e spirit of the owner. Other 
lands were purchased b\' Mr. Glidden as his 
capital has increased and he now owns over 
fifteen hundred acres, wherefrom he derives 
a good income. He has always been inter- 
ested in the raising of fine stock and in con- 




J. F. GLIDDEN 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



303 



nection with H. B. Sanborn is the owner of 
a cattle ranch in Texas, where they arc 
herding about sixteen thousand head of cat- 
tle. They own two hundred and eighty 
sections of land, covering two hundred and 
eighty square miles of territory and requir- 
ing one hundred and fifty miles of fencing. 
This has now been turned over to his daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Bush, who owns one hundred 
thousand acres. 

But it is in connection with the inven- 
tion of barb wire that Mr. Cilidden is best 
known to the world. His name in that 
connection is widely familar. The lack of 
timber in Illinois made lumber for fencing 
very expensive and how to obtain fencing 
material at a low price was a problem which 
presented itself to many without solution. 
Some attempted to obviate the difficult3' 
with onl}- partial success. As early as 
1S67 barb wire had been invented, but it 
was imperfect and further study and labor 
were required to make it a marketable com- 
modity. Mr. Glidden was a practical 
agriculturist. His own broad acres re- 
quired fencing and occasioned his study of 
the subject. Careful thought, investigation 
and experiment followed, and October, 1S73, 
he applied for a patent, which was granted 
the next spring. He did not here end his 
labors but continued his work of improve- 
ments and tested the utility of his invention 
by the use of his fencing on his own farm. 
The barbs were cut by hand and afterward 
the parts of an old coffee mill were ex- 
temporized as a machine for coiling them 
about the wire. When a piece twenty or 
thirty feet long had been barbed, a smooth 
wire was placed beside it and one pair of 
ends was fastened to a tree and the other 
attached to the axle of a grindstone, which 
by turning with a crank gave it the required 

15 



twist. Having secured his patents Mr. 
Glidden entered into partnership with I. L. 
Ellwood, a hardware merchant of De Ivalb 
and a practical man of affairs, who was 
placed in charge of the business manage- 
ment, operations being begun under the 
firm name of Glidden & Ellwood. There 
is no doubt, however, that Mr. Glid- 
den is the inventor of the perfectetl barb 
wire now in use. He applied for his patent 
in 1S73, his claim was acknowledged and he 
secured it. He sold his interest in 1S76, 
but continuei-i to draw his royalties until 
1 89 1. He has been the inventor of all 
essential features of barb wire machines now 
in use, and to him is due the great credit 
for bringing to the people of the west a 
cheap and serviceable substitute for the 
stone, rail or wooden fences once in use. 
As time passed the business grew and was 
removed from the farm to the village, where 
a small factory was established, and here 
the improvement was made of using horse 
power to do the twisting, the barbs being 
slipped on to one end of the wire and 
then placed the proper distance apart by 
hand. In 1S75 the company built the first 
part of the old brick shop, put in a small 
steam engine, which was made to do the 
twisting, and Mr. Gildden and T. W. 
\'aughn obtained a patent for some de\-ices 
for barbing and spooling that proved of 
efficient aid to the workmen. 

In 1876 Mr. Glidden sold his interest in 
the business to the Washburn & Moen Man- 
ufacturing Company, of Worcester. Mass- 
achusetts, and the effectiveness and utility 
of the new invention having been fully dem- 
onstrated the business increased with aston- 
ishing rapidity. Mr. Glidden has realized 
a fortune from his invention, obtaining a 
large royalty until 1891. Business cares, 



304 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



however, he has never laid aside. Indolence 
and idleness are utterly foreign to his nature, 
and he still devotes many hours each day to 
the superintendence of his business interests. 
He is the owner of the De Kalb Roller Mills, 
has been vice-president of the De Kalb Na- 
tional Bank since its organization in iSS^;, 
and is the proprietor of the Glidden House, 
making a very genial and popular landlord. 
He has carried forward to successful com- 
pletion all that he has undertaken in the 
business world. His business methods have 
ever commended him to the confidence of 
the public, for he never swerves from the 
strict path of honesty, and his success has 
been won along the lines of unflagging in- 
dustry and enterprise, guided by sound judg- 
ment and careful management. His rela- 
tion with his employees had ever been one 
of friendly interest, and he is quick to rec- 
ognize true worth in a man, no matter how 
humble his station in life. He is e\er will- 
ing to aid the industrious and his industries 
have been such as promote the public pros- 
perity as well as advance individual success. 
His deep interest in public affairs and 
the welfare of the community was shown 
by his liberal donation of si.Kty-four acres of 
land to the normal school, provided the in- 
stitution was located in De Kalb. This 
land was a part of his old homestead and 
had been entered by him from the govern- 
ment when Indians still crossed it with their 
trails. At the suggestion of Jacob Haish, 
and in the presence of about one hundred 
and fifty citizens, Mr. Glidden broke the 
soil with a lead pencil preparator\^ to build- 
ing, as this little utensil was considered em- 
blematic of literature and education. He 
has always voted the Democratic ticket and 
is loyal and stanch in support of the princi- 
ples of his party, on whose ticket he was 



elected county sheriff in 1S52, being the 
last Democratic official of the countj-. 

Mr. Glidden has been twice married. 
He was married in 1837, in Clarendon, New 
York, to Clarissa Foster, and when he 
started westward he left his wife and two 
children in New York, but both of the latter 
died before Mrs. Glidden came to the west. 
She died in Ogle county, in June, 1843, and 
a daughter born at that time died in early 
infancy. The children of that marriage 
were Virgil, Homer and Clarissa. In Octo- 
ber, 185 1, in Kane county, Illinois, .Mr. 
Glidden wedded Lucinda, daughter of Hen- 
ry \\'arne, and they have one daughter, 
Elva Frances, wife of W. H. Bush, a merchant 
of Chicago. Mrs. Glidden died in 1895. 
iMr. Glidden is a man of domestic tastes and 
his home has ever been to him the dearest 
spot on earth. Tne interests of his wife 
and daughter were always paramount with 
him, and friendship is al\va}'s inviolable. In 
those finer traits of character which attract 
and endear man to man in ties of friendship, 
which triumph o\er misfortune and shine 
brightest in the hour of adversity, in these 
qualities he is royally endowed. Few njen 
have more devoted friends than he, and 
none e.xcel him in unselfish devotion and 
unswerving fidelity to the worthy recipients 
of his confidence and friendship. \\'hile his 
invention has won him world-wide fame, 
these qualities have gained him the respect 
and warm regard of all whom he has met 
personallv and as one of Illinois' most prom- 
inent and worthy citizens he may well be 
numbered. 



GEORGE H. CLAPSADDLE, residing 
on section 24, Paw Paw township, is 
the owner of a valuable farm of one hundred 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



30s 



and sixty acres and is numbered among the 
settlers of De Kalb county of 1849. He 
was born in Herkimer county, New York, in 
the town of Frankfort, March 17, 1S21, and 
is the son of George A. Clapsaddle, also a 
native of Herkimer county, born March 31, 
1782, and the grandson of Andrew Clap- 
saddle, of German parentage. The last 
named grew to manhood in Herkimer county 
and there reared his family. His son, George 
A., was born on the old homestead and 
there grew to manhood, and in the second 
war with Great Britain served his country 
faithfully and well, and was in the engage- 
ment at Sackett's Harbor. He was married 
in Herkimer county to Nancy Bellinger, also 
a native of Herkimer county and a daughter 
of Esquire Bellinger, who was a soldier in 
the Revolutionary war. A brother of Gecrge 
A. Clapsaddle was also a soldier in the war 
of 1812 and was killed in battle. 

In his native county George A. Clapsad- 
dle was engaged in farming, and there reared 
his family. He came west to Illinois in later 
years and joined his children here and with 
them spent his declining years, dying De- 
cember 23, 1859. His remains were re- 
turned to Herkimer county. New York, and 
laid beside those of his wife, who died there 
September 10, 1838. They had a family 
of eight children, five sons and three daugh- 
ters, who grew to mature years. Of these 
George H. and Frederick are the only sur- 
vivors. Elizabeth married Lucas Terpen- 
ing, and they were early settlers of De ICalb 
county, but both are now deceased. Jacob 
came west and settled in Du Page county, 
Illinois, about 1842, and later moved to 
Iowa, where his death occurred: Mary 
married Jeremiah Terpening and settled in 
De Kalb count}-, but both are now deceased. 
Peter G. never came west, but spent his en- 



tire life in Herkimer count}-. George H. is 
the subject of this review. Andrew came 
to De Ivalb county in 184S and here his 
death occurred. Frederick also settled in 
De ICalb county and now owns a farm in 
Paw Paw township. Nanc}' died in Paw 
Paw township, a single lady. 

George H. Clapsaddle spent his boyhood 
and youth in his native county, where he 
received a fair common-school education. 
In his youth he learned the shoemaker's 
trade, serving an apprenticeship of two 
years. He then worked at his trade as a 
journe}-man some eight or ten years, usually, 
however, working on the canal in the sum- 
mer and at his trade in the winter. In 
1S49 he ca:ne to De Kalb county, locating 
on a farm where he now resides, land which 
his brother Andrew entered the year pre- 
vious. Erecting a house upon the place he 
there resided with his brother .Andrew, the 
two keeping " bach " while opening up their 
farms, Andrew's farm being on the opposite 
side of the road. 

Mr. Clapsaddle returned to his native 
state, and in Erie county, October i, 1855, 
married Miss Clarissa Snook, a native of 
Madison county. New York, and returning 
with his young bride, they commenced their 
domestic life on the farm which he had 
already opened up. After a period of forty 
years, Mrs. Clapsaddle was called to her re- 
ward, dying October 26, 1885, and her re- 
mains were laid to rest in the Victor ceme- 
tery. She was the mother of five children, 
three of whom are deceased, two dying in 
infancy and one, \'iola L., at the age of 
fifteen years. The living are Leila M., at 
home, and .\lva A,, who is engaged in farm- 
ing in Paw Paw township. He was mar- 
ried in Earlville, La Salle county, I'ebruary 
iS, 1897, to Hannah M. Anderson, a native 



3o6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of La Salle county, born and reared in Le- health failing rapidly, he retired from active 
land, and a daughter of Andrew and Eliza service, went to Venango county to the 



Anderson. They have now one daughter, 
Leila Louise. 

Politically Mr. Clapsaddle is a Jackson- 
ian Democrat, and cast his first presidential 
vote for James K. Polk in 1S44. His son 



home of his wife's parents to recuperate, 
and there died, April 25, 1S56. He mar- 
ried Miss Hannah King, born in Northum- 
berland county, Pennsylvania, June 25, 
1825, and a daughter of Samuel King, a 



office that Mr. Clapsaddle has held has been 
that of school director, as his tastes has 
never run in the direction of office holding. 
In the fort\-nine years in which he has re- 
sided here he has made man}- friends who 
esteemed him for his steiling worth. 



also votes the Democratic ticket. The only carpenter and builder of Venango county, 

Pennsylvania, who came from Schuylkill 
count}', where he was born, August 20, 
1792. Soon after his marriage he settled 
in Venango county and died there at the 
age of fifty-eight years. He married Bar- 
bara Gilger, born August 30, 1798, in North- 
umberland count}-, Pennsylvania, and who 
died at the age of eighty-three years. 

Rev. Joseph Truby was the son of 
Phillip Truby, who was born in Armstrong 
count}-, Pennsyhania, and who, after his 
marriage, moved to Grant, Starke county, 
Ohio. He was a blacksmith by trade and 
died at the residence of his son in Elkhart, 
Indiana, when more than seventy years of 
age. Alter the death of her husband Mrs. 
Joseph Truby married Abraham Niebel, now 
a resident of Sycamore, Illinois. To our 
subject's parents four children were born, 
two of whom are living, Samuel, in Maple 
Park, Illinois, and Nathaniel G., our sub- 
ject. 

The early years of our subject were 
spent in the various towns in which his fa- 
ther was stationed. After the latter's death 
he lived in \'enango county for some years. 



Nx\THANIEL G. TRUBY, the leading 
harnessmaker of Sycamore, was born 
in North Lima, Columbiana county, Ohio, 
January 13, 1851. His father, Joseph Tru- 
by, was born in Armstrong county, Pennsyl- 
vania, July 26, 1820. He was a man of 
great natural ability, self-educated in Latin 
and Greek, and for seventeen years was a 
minister in the Evangelical Association. He 
began preaching at the age of nineteen while 
clerking in his cousin's store, in Clarion 
county, Pennsylvania, filling local pulpits 
on Sundays. His first regular station was 
at Cleveland, Ohio, where he remained one 
year, going from thence to Mercer count}-, 
Pennsylvania, being in the Erie circuit for 
two years, and then in the Harmony circuit, 
Butler county, Penns}-h-ania, for two years. 
His liealth failing him, he was transferred where he attended the public schools for 
to the Columbiana countv, Ohio, circuit, eight vears. After the removal of his 



where he reniained one year, during which 
time our subject was born. He then re- 
turned to the Erie circuit for two years. 
then again in the Columbiana county, Ohio, 
circuit one year, and then to Allegheny 
City, Pennsylvania, for two years. His 



mother to Forreston, Illinois, he attended 
the public schools for one year. At the age 
of fifteen he began learning the trade of har- 
nessmaker and was engaged in that business 
for three years in Forreston, Illinois. From 
there he went to Davis, Stephenson county, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



307 



: Illinois, where he worked as a journeyman 
one year, and then purchased a shop and 
business, which he continued for one year, 
then sold, and for another year clerked in 
a store in Davis. 
; It is seldom a man quits a trade to pur- 
i sue a course of study, but our subject in- 
herited his father's love for learning, and 
went to Mt. Union, Ohio, College, where 
he took a two years course, graduating in 
the commercial department. He then went 
to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he was 
employed as bookkeeper in a grocery store, 
and then for one year was with the Pitts- 
burg Chain and Car Link Company. He 
then went into the oil business at Bradford, 
Pennsylvania, where he remained until 

1881, becoming an expert in the business. 
By reason of his knowledge of the business 
he was called to Russia, where he was en- 
gaged as an oil expert for three years in 
the Caucasus, on the coast of the Black Sea, 
for a French corporation. He prospected 
into Turkish Asia, located wells, installed 
complete plants, built pipe lines, and insti- 
tuted telegraph and telephone service, and 
also put in electrical appliances. The 
company was on a grand scale, with high 
salaried officers and twenty oflice men to 
do the work which one man could well 
have done. The company failing, our sub- 
ject came home in the winter of 1885, and 
in 1886 located in Sycamore, being in- 
fluenced by the brother in Maple Park to 
locate here. 

Mr. Truby \\-a3 married October 10, 

1882, in Emlenton, Pennsylvania, to Miss 
Estella Dreibelbis, born in Emlenton, and 
a daughter of Jacob and Ellen (Hildeman) 
Dreibelbis. By this union there was one 
daughter, Ethel. Mrs. Truby died ^hly 3, 
1887, and in Sycamore, December 7, 1892, 



Mr. Truby married Mrs. Amanda B. Dean, 
widow of Charles A. Dean and daughter of 
Peter and Sarah Brown. His wife is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
In politics he is a Republican and frater- 
nally a member of the Modern Woodmen 
of America and I\nights of the Globe. 



WARREN DECKER, of South Grove 
township, is a \eteran of the Civil 
war. He was born in Crawford county, 
Ohio, August 21, 1839. and is the son of 
James A. and Margaret (\'anderhoof) Deck- 
er, both of whom were nati\e3 of New Jer- 
sey and who were the parents of ten chil- 
dren, si.\ of whom are deceased. The 
li\ing are William, Warren, Charles W. 
and Idella. The paternal grandfather, 
Aaron Decker, was a nati\e of Ohio, and 
came with his parents to De Kalb county 
in 1844, locating in South Grove township 
where James A. Decker, the father, ac- 
quired over fi\'e hundred acres of good 
land. He became quite a prominent man 
in the township, and served as supervisor, 
assessor, road commissioner and school 
director. He was a very successful farmer. 
His death occurred at the age of forty-two 
years. 

On the farm in South Grove township 
our subject grew to manhood, and received 
his education in the district school while 
helping xvith the farm work. In South 
Grove township, August 8, 1862, he enlisted 
in Company C, One Hundred and Fifth 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, to serve three 
years or during the war. With his regi- 
ment he participated in the various cam- 
paigns and battles under Sherman, and was 
in the march to the sea, and later in the 
grand review at Washington, at the close 



3o8 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of the war. He was discharged at Wash- 
ton, D. C. June i6, kST);. 

After receiving his discharge, Mr. Decider 
returned to his home in De I\alb count\- 
and resumed his labors upon the farm. 
Previous to his entering the service, how- 
ever, on the iith of June, 1862, he was 
united in marriage with Miss Harriet Da- 
venport, a native of New York state and a 
daughter of Abraham M. and Margaret 
(Hammond) Davenport, both natives of Jef- 
ferson county. New York, and who \\ere 
the parents of ten children, four of whom 
are deceased. The living are Caroline, 
Elizabeth, Adelaine, Harriet, Nellie and 
Olive. To Mr. and Mrs. Decker seven 
children have been born, of whom Alma is 
deceased. The living are: James, Ella, 
Benjamin. Mertie, Jennie and Delos. 

Fraternally Mr. Decker is a member of 
General Hurlbut Post, No. 580, G. A. R., 
and politically is a stanch Republican. His 
fine farm of one hundred and twenty acres 
is kept under a high state of cultivation. 
Mr. Decker is well known and universally 
respected. 



GURDEN C. ROWEN is a farmer re- 
siding near the village of Genoa, \\here 
he has a tine farm of one hundred and fifty 
acres of choice land. He was born in the 
town of Batavia, Genesee county. New 
York, August 5, 1837. His father, William 
H. Rowen, was born in Washington coun- 
ty. New York, December 3, 1799, and died 
April 4, 1880. He was twice married, his 
first union being with Bets_\- Gorham, who 
was born May 17, iSoi, and died February 
23, 1856. She was the mother of nine 
children, as follows: Stephen G., of Frank- 
lin township; James, deceased; Bo3d, de- 



ceased; Warren, deceased; Theron, residing 
in Kirkland, Illinois; John C, living in Col- 
orado; Mary Ann, wife of Henry Grout, of 
Kirkland; Gurden C, our subject; and 
Perry, deceased. His second union was 
with Maria Caswell, who bore him two chil- 
dren: William, residing in Oregon, Illinois, 
and Samuel G., of Kirkland, Illinois. In 
politics William H. Rowen was originally a 
^^"hig, but later in life a I-iepublican. He 
was a member of the Christian church. 
His father was James Rowen, who came to 
Illinois in 1S43, and died in Franklin town- 
ship at the age of eighty \ears. 

Gurden C. Rowen came west with his 
parents in September, 1843. They drove 
through from New York to Chicago, and 
from there went to Racine and on to Janes- 
ville, \\'isconsin, where they wintered. In 
June, 1846, they came to Franklin town- 
ship, De Kalb county, and there made per- 
manent settlement. In the district schools 
of that township our subject obtained his 
education, attending principally during the 
winter months, and assisting in farm work 
the remainder of the year. 

In February, i860, with four brothers, 
Mr. Rowen started overland to Pike's Peak, 
and was two months on the way. A few 
months experience was all that he desired, 
and he returned home in September of the 
same 3-ear. He ren.aincd under the pa- 
rental roof until the fall of 1S63, and the:i 
went to Nebraska with a \iew of locating, 
but made no permanent settlement. In 
1868 he purchased two hundred and forty 
acres of land lying in Boone and McHenry 
counties, and there built a barn and made 
many other improvements. While he cul- 
tivated the place, he did not take up 
his residence there until some years 
later. He was united in marriage in Spring 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



509 



township, Boone count_v, Illinois. October 
9, 1873, with Miss Gertrude C. Randolph, 
a native of that township, and a daughter 
of Edmund F. Randolph, one of the first 
settlers on Boone's Prairie. It was on his 
farm that the first reaper, an old McCor- 
mick, was operated in Boone county. Mr. 
Randolph was born in Crawford count)-, 
Pennsylvania, near Meadville, December 
8, 1808, and died November 19, i8;8, in 
Boone county, Illinois. He was the son of 
Edward F. Randolph, who died December 
30, 1867, at the age of ninety-eight j-ears, 
and who served in the war of 18 12. He 
had a \-ery strong constit';-tion and was hale 
and heartv in e.Ktreme old age. Edmund 
F. Randolph married Mary T. Hoffman, 
born in Beaver Creek township, Washing- 
ton county, Maryland, September 26, 1S19, 
of German parents. They were the par- 
ents of eight children, Anna E., John F., 
Julia A., William F., Gertrude C, Edmund 
J., Eugenie F. and Cla)ton F. 

Immediately after his marriage, Mr. 
Rowen moved to his farm, and there re- 
sided until 1880, when he moved to Genoa 
township, De Kalb county, Illinois, and has 
here since continued to reside. He first 
purchased thirty acres of land, where his 
house now stands, to which he has since 
added one hundred and twent}' acres. In 
addition to general far.ming, he is engaged 
in dairying, keeping about twenty cows, 
and selling the product to the creamery. 
Since locating he has rebuilt the house and 
barns and made many substantial improve- 
ments. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Rowen three children 
have been born, Floyd R.. and Forrest H., 
who was drowned in 1S92, and Marjorie 
M., who is yet at home. In politics Mr. 
Rowen is a Prohibitionist. He has held the 



position of school director, because of his 
interest in public schools. He is a man of 
good business abilit)- and is one of the direct- 
ors in the Farmers' Mutual Insurance Com- 
pany. 



WILLIAM GOFF is a retired farmer 
residing in the village of Kirkland. 
It IS said to be a good thing to be well born, 
and it can certainlvbe said of Mr. Goff that 
he was well born, being descendants of 
Revolutionary heroes, on both paternal and 
maternal sides. He is a native of Maine. 
)orn December 8, 1822, and is the son of 
Edward and Hannah (Dill) Goff, both of 
whom were also natives of the Pine Tree 
state. Tliey were the parents of nine chil- 
dren — John, Cyrus, Edward, Jr., William, 
Joel, Stephen, James, May and Ann. Of 
the nuinber all are deceased with the excep- 
tion of our subject. The paternal grand- 
father, Bartlett Goff, was a native of Scot- 
land, who emigrated to this country prior 
to the Re\olutionary war. His sympathies 
were upon the side of the Colonists in their 
struggle for independence, and that sym- 
pathy was manifested by j-ears of service in 
the war. Long after independence was de- 
clared and the United States became a free 
and independent nation, he was granted a 
pension for his services, which was contin- 
ued during the remainder of his life. 

William Goff grew to manhood on the 
home farm in Maine, and there received a 
limited education in the schools of that 
early day. In his youth he went into the 
lumber camps, and was engaged in lumber- 
ing and coasting in his native state until he 
was twenty-three years of age. News of 
the boundless opportunities afforded the en- 
terprising man on the broad prairies of Illi- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



nois, had penetrated the forests of Maine, 
and he here determined to try his fortune. 
In the spring of 1846. he came to De Ivalb 
county, and commenced work as a day la- 
borer, continuing to be thus employed for 
some time. On the 15th of April, 1848, he 
was united in marriage with Miss Philanca 
R. Sargent, a native of Vermont, and a 
daughter of Henry and Sarah (Churchill) 
Sargent, both nati%-es of the Green Mount- 
ain state, wiTo were the parents of seven 
children — .\lmond, Leonard, Azuba, Phil- 
anca, Caroline, Alon;io and Calvin. The 
grandfather of Mrs. Goff was Timothy Sar- 
gent, a native of \'ermont, who came to 
De Kalb county, in an early day, and pur- 
chased a large tract of land. He here spent 
the remainder of his life. 

To our subject and wife eight children 
were born, live of whom died in infancy. 
Those living are William A., Belle \'. and 
Vilora A. In 1897, ^Ir. Goff sold his farm, 
erected a nice residence in Kirkland, and is 
now living a retired life. In politics he is 
an ardent Republican, and has served as 
road commissioner and constable of Frank- 
lin township. He is a highly-honored citi- 
zen of the township, and his friends are nu- 
merous throughout the countv. 



CAPTAIN JAMES N. SHAFTER, the 
present efficient sheriff of De Kalb 
county, is a veteran of the Civil war. He 
was born in Galesburg, Michigan, July 7, 
1841, and is the son of Hugh M. Shaffer, 
born in Townsend, \'ermont, in 18 14, and 
the grandson of William Rufus Shafter, also 
a native of Vermont, who spent his entire 
life in his native state, and during his actix'e 
l)usiness career engaged in merchandising. 
He was three times married, his first and 



second wife being sisters. His death oc- 
curred in 1863 at a very advanced age. 

Hugh M. Shafter grew to manhood in 
his native state, and married Eliza Sumner, 
also a native of Townsend, \'ermont, and 
a daughter of Mathias Sumner, a farmer 
and cabinet maker who married Sarah 
Barry, also of the Green Mountain state. 
In 1833 he came west and settled near 
Galesburg, Michigan, where he purchased a 
farm of two hundred and forty acres and 
there resided until his death. Hugh M. and 
Eliza Shafter became the parents of five 
children: William Rufus, the famous com- 
mander of the Cuban army of invasion, 
whose name has been immortalized by the 
heroic deeds of himself and men in the 
siege and capture of Santiago. Eliza Ann, 
\\'ho is now deceased, married Job H. .Aid- 
rich, who was killed at the battle of Nash- 
ville in the Civil war. James N. and John, 
twins, the former being the subject of this 
sketch, while the latter is now customs agent 
for the Mexican Central Railroad, at Eagle 
Pass, Te.xas. Payne died at the age of si.x 
weeks. 

James N. Shafter grew to manhood in 
his native county and state and there made 
his home until 1879. He attended the dis- 
trict schools till the age of twenty, in the 
meantime assisting his father in the cultiva- 
tion of the farm. In 1864, at Galesburg, 
Michigan, he was united in marriage with 
Miss Helen Foote, a native of Galesburg, 
Michigan, and a daughter of Milo Foote, 
who was one of the early settlers of that 
place. Two children came to bless this 
union, Mollie and Jessie. The former mar- 
ried Harry Courtwright, of Downers Grove, 
Du Page county, Illinois, and they have 
one son, Harry. The latter daughter is 
the wife of Tames Tooley, of San Francisco, 




CAPT. JAMES N. SHAFTER. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



313 



California, and they have one daughter, 
Grace. 

Shortly after his marriage Mr. Shafter 
was commissioned first heutenant of Com- 
pany B, Seventeenth United States Colored 
Infantry, later being promoted to rank of 
captain of Company E, same regiment, 
with which company and regiment he 
served until mustered out of the service at 
Nashville, Tennessee, April 25, 1 866. The 
regiment was organized at Xasln'ille, Ten- 
nessee, and was intended as an e.xperiment 
to see if colored troops would act well in 
battle and what sort of soldiers could be 
made of them. They participated in the 
battle of Nashville and showed by their 
actions that they could be trusted under fire 
of the enemy. 

After being mustered out of service 
Captain Shafter returned to his old home, 
where he engaged in farming on the old 
homestead until 1879. He then went to 
Iowa, and spent some si.x or seven months 
looking up a location. Not finding any- 
thing to suit him, in 1880 he came to Sand- 
wich, De Kalb county, Illinois, and was 
soon afterwards made city marshal, in which 
position he served four years. He then 
became a traveling salesman for the Sand- 
wich Manufacturing Compan}', and was in 
the employ of that company until 1894, 
when he was elected sheriff of De Ivalb 
county, which office he has filled to the 
eminent satisfaction of his constituents, 
which is evidenced by their nominating him 
for the office of county treasurer in the sum- 
mer of 1898, to which office he will doubt- 
less be elected. 

Captain Shaffer's second marriage was 
in Sandwich, in 1875, when he wedded 
Nancy, widow of Alexander Edmburn, and 
a daughter of John and Rachel Haymond. 



They resided in Sandwich from 1880 until 
the election of the Captain as sheriff of the 
county in 1894, when they removed to Syca- 
more, where they yet reside. 

In politics Captain Shafter is a stanch 
Republican, and fraternally is a Mason, a 
member of the blue lodge, chapter and 
commandery in Sycamore. He is also a 
member of the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen and of the Grand Army of the 
I\epublic. He is a well known sportsman, 
and is fond of trap or live bird shooting. It 
is said that he will travel farther to partici 
pate in a match, and will get more enjoy- 
ment out of it, than probably any other 
man in De Kalb county. He is the posses-' 
sor of many trophies that he has won by 
his skill as a marksman. 

While a citizen of the county compara- 
tively a short time. Captain Shafter is well 
known and his friends are legion. A thor- 
ougti patriot, he has shown his devotion to 
his country by imperiling his life upon the 
field of battle, and, while now in civil life, 
the honor and integrity of his country is as 
dear to his heart as in the days of the Civil 
war, when the brightest and best of our 
country went out in their youth and in the 
prime of life that the Union might be saved. 
As a citizen he stands ready to do his duty 
in whatever position he may be called to 
fill. In the office of sheriff of the county 
he carefully guarded the interests of the 
people against the criminal class, and in the 
treasurer's office he will show the same 
watchful care in safely keeping the trust 
committed to his hands. 



EDWIN TOWNSEND, who resides on 
section 14, May field township, is a 
native of De Kalb county, born on the farm 



314 



'HE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



where he now resides November ii, 1838. 
His father, Charles Townsend, was born in 
Schoharie county, New Yorl<, of which 
count}- the grandfather, Joshua Townsend, 
was an earl\- settler. The latter was a 
member of an artillery company during the 
war of 1812, but was never in active serv- 
ice. From Schoharie county he mo\ed to 
Sullivan count}-. New York, at an early 
day, where he cleared a tract of land and 
opened up a farm. Charles Townsend 
there grew to manhood and niarried Phebe 
Nichols, a daughter of Reuben and Mercy 
Nichols, natives of Connecticut. In 1S36 
loshua Townsend came to De Kalb county, 
Illinois, purchased a claim and returned to 
Sullivan county. New York, but four years 
later again can-ie to De Kalb count}-, mak- 
ing his home with his sons. In 1837 
Charles Townsend came through with a 
wagon and was six \\eeks on the road. He 
located on a portion of the clain-i purchased 
b\- his father, and in company with his 
father and brother Stephen opened up and 
developed the farm, all working together 
for several years, after which they di\-ided 
the claim. Charles Townsend kept the 
•place where our subject now resides, o\\'ning 
a little more than two hundred acres. He 
remained on the farm and continued its 
improvement until his death, about 1880. 
His wife survived him about one year, dying 
in 1881, and both were laid to rest in the 
Mayfield cemetery. They were the parents 
of ten children, all of whom grew to mature 
years, except two, and all born on the farm 
in Mayfield township, with the exception of 
Mary Ann, who was born in Sullivan county, 
New York. She grew to womanhood and 
married Oscar Schmaldt, but is now de- 
ceased. Edwin, the subject of this sketch, 
was next in order of birth. Francis is a 



farmer residing in Butler county, Iowa. 
Clarissa is the wife of Henry Osborn, a 
farmer of Mayfield township. Erastus re- 
sides in Hutchinson, Minnesota. Harrison 
is a farmer residing in Perry, Iowa. Caro- 
line is the wife of S. Ci. Smith, a farmer of 
Mayfield township. Charles M. is a farmer 
residing in Bremer county, Iowa. 

Edwin Townsend grew to manhood on 
the old home farm and remained with his 
father until he attained his majorit}-. His 
education was attained in the common 
schools of his township, supplemented f-iy 
two winter terms in a select school at Syca- 
more. After attaining his majority he 
worked one sumn-ier for a cousin on his farm 
and then took possession of a portion of the 
farm he now owns. In March, 1865, he 
enlisted in the Ninth Illinois Cavalry, join- 
ing his regiment in the east part of Missis- 
sippi and continued with it until the close 
of the war, scouting in Mississippi and 
Alabama and doing guard duty. He was 
discharged at Selma, Alabama, in Novem- 
ber, 1865. 

Returning home Mr. Townsend resumed 
farming, and on the JOth of Januar\-, 1867, 
at Cedar Falls, Iowa, he was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Lorinda M. French, a na- 
tive of De Kalb count}-, Illinois, born in 
Sycamore, and a daughter of Sunnier 
French, who was a pioneer of De Kalb 
count}', locating in Sycamore in 1835. 
About 1862, Mr. Townsend had purchased 
eighty acres of his present farm, and after 
his marriage, they commenced their domes- 
tic life on that place, and there continued 
to reside until 1880. After the father's 
death, he purchased the old homestead, 
comprising one hundred and forty-two acres, 
and now has a valuable faun of two hun- 
dred and twentv-two acres, all of w-hich is 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



under cultivation and well improved in 
every respect. 

Mr. and Mrs. Townsend are the parents 
of seven children: Charles S. is married 
and engaged in farming m Mayfield town- 
ship. Orisa S. is the wife of Samuel Bick- 
ford, of Ivewanee, Illinois. Leona yet re- 
sides at home, as also Olive, Nellie, George 
and Glen. 

Politically Mr. Townsend is a Repub- 
lican, with which part}' he has been identi- 
fied since casting his Hrst presidential vote 
for Abraham Lincoln in iS6o. He has 
taken an active part in local politics, and is 
often sent as a delegate to the various con- 
ventions of his party. For two years he 
served as commissioner of highways, was 
township trustee a number of years, and in 
1S95 ''^■''S elected a member of the county 
board of supervisors, and re-elected in 1898, 
and is now serving his second term. Among 
the committees of which he has been a 
member are public buildings and grounds, 
Canada thistle, re\-enue and assessment, re- 
funding of ta.xes, etc. He has also served 
as a member of the school board for several 
years. Religiously Mrs. Townsend is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and fraternally he is a member of the Grand 
Arm}' post at Sscamore. A life-long resi- 
dent of De Kalb county, he is entitled to 
honor for the good that he has done in de- 
veloping the county, giving it a rank second 
to none in this state. 



BAILEY ROSETTE, editor and pro- 
prietor of the De Kalb Advertiser, is a 
native of De Kalb county, born in Paw 
Paw township. He is a son of William E. 
and Elizabeth (Breese) Rosette, both na- 
tives of New Jersey, the former being of 



French extraction, who was born in this 
country a short time after the arrival of his 
parents. They were among the early pio- 
neers of De Kalb count}', locating in Paw 
Paw township about 1841. In early life 
William E. Rosette learned the harness- 
maker's trade, at which he worked a num- 
ber of years. Later, however, he turned 
his attention to farming, which vocation he 
followed during the remainder of his life. 
He died in 1880, while his wife survived 
him four years, dying in 1884. The family 
consisted of ten children, six of whom are 
living, two of the number being editors. 
The father lived an upright life, and received 
the respect of all who knew him. 

Bailey Rosette is the youngest of the 
family. He was reared and educated in the 
\illage of Paw Paw, where he completed 
his literar}' course in the seminary at that 
l^lace. His time alternated between the 
schoolroom and the farm until he reached 
his twentieth \'ear, when he \\'ent to De 
Kalb, Illinois, and entered the printing 
office of the Glidden Publishing Company, 
where he remained ten years. In Novem- 
ber, 1S95, he opened a job printing office 
on Main street which proved so successful 
that in March, 189S, he began the publica- 
tion of the De Kalb Advertiser. This live- 
ly paper, though young, enjoys a large and 
increasing patronage, and takes rank among 
the leading local papers of the county. Its 
editor is a wide-awake man who thoroughly 
understands his business, and seems to be 
in harmony with it. 

On November 26, 1889, Mr. Rosette 
was joined in marriage with Miss Minnie 
Smith, daughter of John and Ann Smith, of 
Clinton, Iowa. By this union there is one 
child, Breese Rosette, born June 28, 1892. 

Fraternally Mr. Rosette is a member of 



3i6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the Knights of the Globe, Royal Arcanum, 
Modern W'oodmen of America, and Knights 
of P3thias. As a citizen he advocates every 
enterprise for the public good. 



WILLIAM WITTER, who has a tine 
farm on sections 3 and 10, Franklin 
township, traces his ancestry to his great- 
grandfather, Joseph Witter, Sr., a native 
of Germany, who came to America in 
colonial days, locating in Massachusetts, 
where he followed farming during his en- 
tire life. His son, John Witter, Jr., was 
a native of Massachusetts, uhere he also 
followed the occupation of a farmer. 
During the war of 18 12 he served faith- 
fully and well as a soldier. His son. Dr. 
Joseph Witter, was also a native of Massa- 
chusetts, but who removed to the state of 
Ohio when a young man and there en- 
gaged in the practice of medicine. He 
later moved to Cuyahoga county, Ohio, 
where he continued in practice. He mar- 
ried Miss Esther Overocker, a native of 
New York, and they became the parents 
of four children: William, Milo, Catherine 
and Sarah. Of these the two last named 
are deceased. From Ohio, Dr. \\'itter 
moved with his famil}- to Michigan in 1837, 
and located on a farm near Ann Arbor. 

William ^^■itter was born in Cuyahoga 
county, Ohio, February 21, 1S21. Before 
leaving his native state, he acquired a lim- 
ited education in the common schools. 
He was si.Nteen vears of age when he ac- 
companied his parents to Washtenaw coun- 
ty, Michigan, and he there remained until 
iS43,when he came to Illinois and located in 
Boone county, where he purchased one hun- 
dred and twenty acres of government land, 
which he proceeded to develop into a pro- 



ductive farm. He continued a resident of 
Boone county until 1886, in the meanwhile 
giving his attention exclusively to farming. 
Since that time he has lived a retired life 
in the village of Kirkland. 

On the 1 8th of November, 1846, Mr. 
Witter was united in marriage with Julia 
A. Shirley, a native of Ohio, and by this 
union were three children: Joseph C, 
Ellen E. and Mary A. For thirty-seven 
Mrs. Witter was an invalid, and during the 
last twenty-five \'ears of her life she was 
unable to walk a step. Death came to her 
relief June 4, 1S89, at the age of si.xty-four 
years. 

The maternal grandfather of our sub- 
ject, Adam Overocker, was a native of Ger- 
many, who came to America before the 
Re\olutionary war. In that war he served 
as a soldier, and after its close was made a 
pensioner, which pension was continued 
until his death. 

Politically Mr. Witter was originally a 
Whig, casting his first presidential vote for 
\\'illiam Henry Harrison. Because of his 
liberty views he drifted into the Repub- 
lican party on its organization, and with 
that party has si::ce continued to act. 
While never desiring public office, he has 
served as road cominissioner, to the satis- 
faction of those residing with his district. 
He is a member of the Congregational 
chnrch, with which body his wife was also 
identified. A Christian man, he endeavors 
to live up to the teachmgs of the golden 
rule, and so live as to merit the re.-pect of 
his fellow citizens. 



CHRISTIAN J. OHLMACHER, one of 
the leading plumbers of Sycamore, Il- 
linois, was born near Frankfort -on -the- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



317 



Main, Province of Nassau, German)-, June 
14, 1844. He began his school life in Ger- 
many and there attended school some eight- 
een months, when in 1S51 his p-^.rents sailed 
for America. The family went down the 
Rhine to Rotterdam, from which place they 
went to London, where they were joined by 
the father, Henry Ohlmacher, who had fled 
the country, having participated in the rev- 
olution of 1848. He escaped to Swit;?er- 
land and thence made his way to London, 
where he waited for his family. He served 
with the German troops under ^^'ellington 
at the battle of Waterloo, and was with the 
army that marched into Paris, where, at 
Castle Hugenot, his brother, a fine marks- 
man, jumped on the wall to bring down a 
French of^cer. He succeeded, but received 
a bullet through his own head. The pa- 
ternal grandfather, Phillip Ohlmacher, was 
a shepherd in Germany and there lived and 
died. 

Henry Ohlmacher, the father, was by 
trade a gilder of metals, such as swords, 
guns, etc.', a work at that time done by 
hand instead of electricity as now done. 
He married Catherine Priestersbach, who 
was born in Nassau, Germany, and an only 
child of her parents. They became the 
parents of six sons and fourdaughters. seven 
of whom are yet living. On coming to this 
country the family located in the suburbs of 
Sandusky, Ohio, where the father purchased 
a small farm and there lived and died in 
1873, when about seventy-six years old. 
His wife died at the age of eighty-six years. 

The subject of this sketch attended the 
Sandusky schools until the age of fourteen 
years, when he went to Cincinnati, Ohio, to 
drive an express wagon for his brother and 
there remained three years. From Cincin- 
nati he went to Aurora, Illinois, where sev- 



eral of his brothers were then living, and 
there learned the tinner's trade, serving 
until twenty-one years old. Returning to 
Sandusky, Ohio, he remained eighteen 
months, and then came back to Aurora, Il- 
linois, where he was in the hardware busi- 
ness from 1868 to 1874.' In the latter year 
he sold out and came to Sycamore, Illinois, 
and served as foreman in the shops of Cap- 
tain Whittemore for more than twenty 
years. In the sunnner of 1897 he opened 
an establishment of his own, where he does 
all kinds of tin and sheet metal work and 
plumbing, having a well furnished shop 
with all the necessary appliances for doing 
the highest grade of work. 

In 1864 Mr. Ohlmacher was united in 
marriage at Sandusky, Ohio, with Miss 
.\nna Scherer, a native of Portsmouth, Ohio, 
and a daughter of John Scherer who was 
born in Germany. By this union nine chil- 
dren have been born, (i) Albert, who grew 
to manhood in Aurora and Sycamore, and 
after receiving his education in the public 
schools read medicine with Dr. Nesbitt, then 
spent one year at Rush Medical College, 
Chicago, but was later graduated from the 
Chicago Medical College. After his 
graduation he located at Gallipolis, Ohio, 
where he commenced the practice of his 
profession. He is now one of the foremost 
bacteriologists in the country. In the summer 
of 1897 he visited the hospitals and colleges 
in New York, Philadelphia, Boston and 
Washington, making special study of an- 
titoxin and reduced the time of perfecting 
the serum from six months to three weeks, 
which called forth complimentary and 
congratulatory notices in all the leading 
medical journals of the country. He married 
Miss Grace Peck, of Sycamore, Illinois, and 
thev have two children, Horace and Albert. 



3>8 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



(2) Fred, who is in business in Lockport, 
Illinois, married Miss Blanche Paddock, 
and they have two children, \'era and 
Florence. (3) Dora, and (4) William, are 
deceased. (5) Lillian is in the employ of 
Johnson lS; King, dry goods merchants of 
Sycamore. (6) Joseph is now a medical 
student in the Chicago College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons. (7) Henry is deceased. 
(8) Annie is a teacher in the public schools 
of Sycamore. (9) Winfield is learning his 
father's trade. 

In politics Mr. Ohimacher is an in- 
dependent Democrat, and has served as 
alderman in Sycamore for several terms. 
He is now superintendent of the city water 
works, a position he is well qualified to fill. 
Fraternally he is a Mason, having member- 
ship in the blue lodge, chapter and com- 
mandery, and has represented the order in 
the grand lodge. He is also a member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, has 
filled all the chairs of his lodge, and has re- 
presented it in the grand lodge. He was 
formerly a member of the Knights of 
Pythias, when the order had a lodge in 
Sycamore. An e.xpert workman, good 
business man, public spirited and enterpris- 
ing, he has many friends in Sycamore and 
throughout De Kalb county. 



KENDALL JACKMAN, who is engaged 
in the lumber business at Genoa, Illi- 
nois, is one of the representative business men 
of the place. He was born at Chautauqua, 
Franklin count}-. New York, September 22, 
1824, and is the son of Abner and Mary 
(Kendall) Jackman, the former a native of 
Weathersfield, \'ermont, born in iSoo, and 
who died in De Kalb countx', in November, 
1851. When a young man, he moved to 



Franklin county. New York, and in 1834 
came to Illinois and bought a farm near 
Plainfield. In 1836, he bought a farm of 
two hundred acres in Sycamore township, 
and there spent the remainder of his life. 
He was a member of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church and a strong abolitionist. For 
several years he served as justice of the 
peace. His wife survived him many years, 
dying when seventy years old. They were 
the parents of seven children as follows: 
Kendall, Mrs. Eliza A. Brown, Martin 
Luther, .Mrs. Armenia Nichols, Mrs. Lou- 
isa A. Brown, Mrs. Hattie DePue, and Mrs. 
Mary A. Field, 

Kendall Jackson was ten years old when 
he accompanied his parents to Illinois. 
While yet residing in New York, he attend- 
ed the district school, and on coming to 
Sycamore township he attended school in 
the first log school-house built in the town- 
ship. \\'hen he attained his majority, he 
commenced working for himself, at ten dol- 
lars per month, on various farms in the 
neighborhood, and continued to be thus em- 
ployed for two years. At times he worked 
in a hay field at fifty cents per day. He 
was married in Sycamore township, Octo- 
ber 10, 1847, to Miss Ann C. Hunt, a na- 
tive of New Jersey, and a daughter of 
Hedges and Sarah (Stark) Hunt. By this 
union two children were born, Frank H. 
and Vesper, the latter being deceased. 
I'Vank H. grew to manhood, and first mar- 
ried Eva Guernsey, by whom he had one 
daughter, Eveline. His second marriage 
was with Letitia Van Alstine, a tiaughter of 
William Van Alstine, and they have one 
s.in, William. 

.\fter his marriage, Mr. Jacktnan rented 
land and commenced farming for himself. 
His outfit consisted of two steers and an old 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



319 



cart. After renting for a year or two, he 
purchased forty acres in Sycamore town- 
ship, to which he added froin time to time 
until he had a large and finely iinpro\'ed 
farm. He continued to reside upon that 
place, engaged in farming, until I'SjS, when 
he moved to the village of Genoa and com- 
menced dealing in coal, wood, grain, stock 
and farm machinery. He continued in busi- 
ness alone for eight years, when he took his 
sons into partnership with him, and they 
have since continued in business under the 
firm name of Jackman & Sons. 

In politics Mr. Jackman is a Republic- 
an, with which party he has been identified 
since its organization. For fifteen years he 
served his township as supervisor, and that 
he discharged the duties of the office satis- 
factorily is attested by the long-continued 
service. He has been a master Mason for 
twenty-five years. Mr. Jackman arrived in 
De I\.alb county before the Indians had left, 
and has witnessed the development of this 
garden spot of the continent from a wilder- 
ness to its present highly-cultivated condi- 
tion. He first lived in a log house, and 
went twenty-five or thirty miles to mill. 
The country was open, no fences having 
been erected, and he could ride over it in 
any direction. Few houses were in sight 
from even the highest ooint of land. 



THOMAS S. CORKINGS, deceased, was 
a native of Lincolnshire, England, born 
in 1830, and was the son of William and 
Mary Corkings, both of whom were also 
natives of England. In 1848, when but 
eighteen years old, he came to the United 
States and located in Niagara county, New 
York. The following year his parents also 
emigrated to this country, and after remain- 



ing in Niagara county about two years, they 
removed to Belvidere, Illinois, where the 
father engaged in agricultural pursuits, and 
for several years successfully carried on a 
farm in Boone county. Later he removed 
to Ue Kalb, where he engaged in the brew- 
ing business, in which he continued a num- 
ber of years, when he sold his interest, in 
1872, to our subject. After a few years of 
retired life he died at De Kalb, and was 
soon followed by his wife. 

Thomas Corkings was fourth in a family 
of si.\ children, and was reared and educated 
in his nati\-e country. For some years 
after his arrival in the United States he fol- 
lowed farming, but in 1872, as stated, he 
purchased his father's interest in a brewery 
at De I\alb, and successfully conducted it 
until 1 884, after which he engaged in no 
special line of business. 

On the 30th of June, 1863, Mr. Corkings 
married Miss Sarah A. Garlick, a native of 
Canada, born November 16, 1843, and a 
daughter of Joseph and Eliza Garlick, na- 
tives of England, but of Scotch descent, 
who emigrated to Canada and later to the 
United States. By this union were three 
children, two of whom are living, George 
and Joseph \\'. In 1873 they adopted an- 
other child, Nellie, born in De Ivalb. 

Fraternally Mr. Corkings was a Mason, 
being a member of the blue lodge at De 
Kalb and the commandery at Sycamore. 
He was a man of rare business talents, keen 
perceptions and broad ideas. He held the 
office of alderman for a time to the ciedit 
of those who elected him. He died in Feb- 
ruary, 1896, at the age of ^i.\ty-two years. 
In his death the wife lost a loving husband, 
the children an affectionate father and the 
community one of its most enterprising 
citizens. 



o-O 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



HORACE HASKINS, who resides upon 
section 34, Genoa township, is one of 
the most successful farmers and financiers 
in De Kalb count}-. He was born near 
Henderson Harbor, in Jefferson county, 
New York, on the borders of Lake Ontario, 
November 17, 1820. His father, John Has- 
kins, was a native of New York, born Feb- 
ruary 13, 1 78 1. He was a farmer and fish- 
erman, depending mostly upon the lake for 
his sustenance. His wife, Mary Tolman, 
was born .\ugust 28, 1783. Her ancestors 
came to America in the Mayflower. John 
and Mary (Tolman) Haskins were the par- 
ents of thirteen children, of whom our sub- 
ject was tenth in order of birth. They 
never came west, but died in the county 
which had so long been their home, the 
father in 1856 and the mother in 1825. 
He served in the war of 1812. The pater- 
nal grandfather, John Haskins, .Sr. , was a 
farmer by occupation, and it is supposed 
that he served in the Revolutionary war. 

The subject of this sketch grew to man- 
hood in his native county, and assisted his 
father in fishing and working a small piece 
of ground. He began life under very un- 
favorable conditions, but was alwas's handy 
with tools, and early in life learned 
the cabinet-maker's trade, and for a time 
engaged in the manufacture of trunks, from 
which he derived some little income. He 
was a shrewd trader even in his boyhood, 
and followed the Yankee boy's bent of trad- 
ing jack-knives, taking a poor knife, sharp- 
ening and polishing it, then trading for 
another one, getting " boot." In this way 
he made enough to pay tuition in the prim- 
itive schools, and also pay his father's ta.xes, 
which, by the way, were less than a dollar. 
After securing an arithmetic, he attended 
school but eleven days, from the fact that 



being so handy with his knife he was asked 
by the teacher to make and :nend all the 
pens, which were then made entirely of 
quill, and being too obliging for his own 
good he was kept busy helping the teacher. 

^^'hen but five years of age Mr. Haskins 
lost his mother, and his father later married 
a widow who had children by a former hus- 
band, thus increasing the family to twenty- 
two, which was entirely too many mouths 
to feed on the small income that could be 
derived from fishing and working the small 
place. In view of this fact, our subject de- 
termined to improve his fortunes in the 
west. On March 11, 1841, when but little 
more than twenty years old, he married 
Miss Polly Maria Beebe, born in the town 
of Loraine, Jefferson county. New York, 
June 17, 1S20, and a daughter of John 
Beebe, a cabinet maker by trade, who mar- 
ried Sallie Clark, daughter of John Clark. 
I^y this union there were three children: 
James Harvey, who died on the lake during 
the emigration of the family; Mary Eliza- 
beth, wife of John Haines, of New Hamp- 
shire; and Martha Minerva, wife of Daniel 
Beebe, residing on our subject's farm near 
Charter Grove station, De Kalb county, Illi- 
nois. Mr. Haskins adopted Horace Clar- 
ence Haskins, July 27, 1870, as his son. 
He was born Maj' 4, 1866. XN'hen grown 
to manhood he married Clara Vogel, and 
they have three children, Nora, James H. 
and Pearl. They live in the village of 
Charter Grove. 

The father-in-law of our subject decided 
to couie west with him, and Mr. Haskins 
assisted in the building of a boat, at Hen- 
derson's Harbor, that was to make its 
maiden trip to Chicago in 1844. After 
finishing the boat the fatlier-in-law sold his 
farm, and joining our subject, they both 




HORACE HASKINS. 




MRS. HORACE HASKINS, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



3^5 



came west with their families. It was a 
long voyage, their vessel being detained one 
week in the Welland canal, where the }i)aiig 
son of our subject was taken sick, and grow- 
ing worse, he died in the straits of Macki- 
nac, and was buried at Milwaukee. He 
landed at Chicago with bnt five dollars and 
thirty-seven and a half cents and from that 
place went to St. Charles, Kane county, 
Illinois, where he got work but was nearly- 
cheated out of his wages. After remaining 
in St. Charles a few weeks he started for De 
Kalb county, and passed through Burlington 
township, Kane county, July 4, 1844. His 
first settlement was made in Sycamore town- 
ship, where he rented a farm of Elihu 
Wright, and then worked for another party 
for a pair of young steers, and traded until 
he got another pair. In trading he always 
came out just a little ahead. His first pur- 
chase of land was forty acres of timber, 
the title of which was defective owing to a 
prior claim. He gave up half to get a clear 
title to the remainder. That twenty acres 
yet remains in his possession. Finally he 
bought forty acres in his wife's name, in 
Genoa townshi[), and furty acres just west 
in his own name, where he has since re- 
sided, a period of more than fifty years. 

I,atci- Mr. Haskins purchased the Jona- 
than Perry farm in Sycamore township, in 
partnership with another man. Having to 
make most of the payments, he finally got 
a division of the land, and soon had a clear 
title to one hundred and si.\ty-two and a 
half acres, on which one of his daughters 
now resides. During the early days he bor- 
rowed money at thirty-three and a third per 
cent, interest, and for a short time borrowed 
some at one hundred per cent, interest. 
In his business management he has been 
wonderfully successful, being a man of fine 



judgment and quirk to see advantages in a 
purchase. He has now two hundred and 
lifty acres in De Kalb counts, si.\ty acres in 
Sac county, Iowa, nearly one thousand 
acres in Madison count}-, Nebraska, about 
seven miles froni Madison, the county seat. 
Recently he sold one hundred and si.xty 
acres in Michigan. He has made many im- 
provements in land owned by him, built 
many houses and barns, erected numerous 
windmills, and supplied each farm with im- 
proved implements. While lixing on his 
first rented farm in 1844, he bought in Chi- 
cago and brought to De Kalb county, the 
first steel scouring plow ever brought to the 
count}-, wooden mold boards being used 
prior to that time. 

On the iith of March, 1891, Mr. and 
.Mrs. Haskins celebrated their golden wed- 
ding, many guests being received from Syca- 
more and surrounding points. Old friends 
who have lived through changes of the 
countr\-, from a waving sea of prairie grass 
to a garden of plenty, and who were able 
to recall many interestmg scenes of the long 
ago. Four years later, however, on the 
9th of .\pril, 1895, Mrs. Haskins was called 
t(i her tinal rest. 

A few years since Mr. Haskins re-visited 
his old home in New ^'ork, and, like Rip 
\'an Winkle, he knew no one and was un- 
known. The old mill and nam were gone, 
the Baptist church of the hill side, which 
he saw built, haddis appeared and the only 
trace of his father's old homestead was a 
decaying gatepost which he had set out 
more than half a century ago. In politics 
Mr. Haskins is a Republican, but has never 
had time for public office; a man of unusual 
e.xecutive ability, his success has been great 
and he is now living to enjoy the fruits of a 
lile well spent. 



thp: biographical record. 



HHNKV H. GL'KLEK, dairyman, is 
considered by Americans and Cana- 
dians to be the best authority on dairyinfj 
in America. He was born in Chesterfield, 
Cheshire county, New Hampshire, May 21, 
1840. His parents, Benjamin and Harriet 
(Hopkins) Gurler, soon afterwards removed 
to Keene, New Hampshire, where they re- 
sided until 1856, when they came to De 
l\.alb county, and settled on section 32, De 
Kalb township. Thex' were both natives of 
New England, the former born in Massa- 
chusetts and the latter in New Hampshire. 
The Curlers are of Welsh extraction, while 
the Hopkins are of English. Benjamin 
Gurler was a mechanic, but later in life 
abandoned it for the culti\ation of the soil. 
On coming to De Kalb township he pur- 
chased a farm of one hundred and seventy 
acres, which was partially improved, and 
there remained peacefully and honorably 
until old age advanced the pace, and in 1883 
he retired from actixe life and removed to 
the cit\' of De Kail), where his death oc- 
curred in his eighty-third year. His wife 
died in her se\enty-SL\th year. 

Henry B. Gurler was the first born in the 
family of fi\-e children, four of whom are 
yet living. In his native state he received 
his education and there remained until his 
sixteenth year, when he accompanied his 
parents to De Kalb county. He lived on 
the home I arm and assisted in its cultiva- 
tion, while teaching school two winter 
terms, until he attained his majority. The 
war for the Union was then in progress and 
he offered his services to his country, enlist- 
ing in the Forty-second Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, Compan\- K, under Captain J. D. 
Butts, .^fter experiencing some of the hard- 
ships incident to war life in Missouri, Ken- 
lucky, .Mississippi, Tennessee and .Alabama, 



he was honorably discharged on account of 
disability in September. 1862. In May. 
1864, he re-enlisted in Company K, One 
Hundred and Thirty-second Illinois \"olun- 
teer Infantrj-, and was commissioned second 
lieutenant and was placed on garrison duty 
in Kentucky-, where he remained until Octo- 
ber of the same year and was again honor- 
ably discharged. 

Returning home, Lieutenant Gurler en- 
gaged in general merchandizing in De Kalb, 
in which he continued until 1868, when he 
returned to the farm. He soon purchased 
a farm on section 5, Afton township, which 
he improved and which is now one of the 
finest farms in the township. In 1870 he 
began dairying in a small way, his business 
gradually growing until it has reached phe- 
nomenal dimensions. On commencing the 
business he kept a strict account of all his 
expenditures, experiments made and the 
results of each. His knowledge thus gained 
was in due time given to the world and his 
ability and authority upon all (juestions per- 
taining to the dairy business was recognized 
throughout the length and breadth of the 
land. 

In 1882 Mr. Gurler removed from his 
farm to the cit}- of De Kalb, \\here he enjoys 
the pleasures and comforts of a fine home. 
It was about this time that he embarked in 
the creamery business proper, forming a co- 
partnership with his brother George and H. 
H. Hopkins, of Hinckley, Illinois. This co- 
. partnership was continued until January i, 
1896, when it was dissolved by mutual con- 
sent and the business di\ided among the 
members of the firm. Mr. Gurler has now 
two creameries and two rnilk stations, one 
of his creameries being at De Kalb and 
the other at Five Corners. During the en- 
tire time in .which he has been engaged in 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the business, he has gi\en it his personal 
supervision, ever}' part of it coming under 
his eye, nothing being too tri\'ial for his 
notice, hence his success. 

In 1891 Professor W. A. Henry, of the 
Wisconsin Agricultural College, importuned 
him to take charge of the dair\- department 
in that institution — the first dairy school in 
America. He accepted the position, and 
was instructor for one term. The state of 
Vermont ne.xt sought his services for her 
agricultural college, where he ser^■ed as in- 
structor two terms. In 1S93 the Pennsyl- 
vania Agricultural College engaged his val- 
uable services, with which he continued three 
terms. .\11 this time his home business was 
making rapid strides, and his reputation ex- 
tended far and near. A new enterprise was 
now thrust upon him. There was a de- 
mand for pure milk in Chicago for infants 
and invalids, leading physicians of the cit}' 
demanding it in their practice. Mr. Curler 
undertook to supply the demand. With 
many misgivings, he commenced the ship- 
ment of "certified milk." He u'as en- 
couraged by those who knew him in this en- 
terprise, one of the professors in an institu- 
tion where he was an instructor in previous 
years, writing him "that if anybody can 
furnish pure milk, \ou can." The following 
named doctors have certified to the purity 
of the milk : W. S. Christopher, Fernand 
Henrotin, Frank S. Johnson, Lester E. 
Frankenthal, A. C. Cottin, Professor Wal- 
ter S. Haines, and nearly fifty others, all of 
Chicago. The business has become enor- 
mous. 

In 1893 Mr. Curler was induced to issue 
a work on dairying by . the authorities of 
those agricultural colleges with which he 
came in touch. This book is the result of 
his own personal experience in the dairy 



business, and is of inestimable value, not 
only to dairymen but to an\' man who keeps 
a milk cow. Its appropriate name is 
"American Dair\ing." This work has been 
highly recommended by the press and also 
by all the highest dairy authorities in the 
country. Of this work, John B. Hand, pro- 
prietor of The Dairy, 144 Fleet street, Lon- 
don, England, says: "The excellent prac- 
tical treatise on dairying, farming and the 
management of creameries by H. B. Curler, 
is of extreme \alue, well written, abounding 
in information. I have nothing but praise 
for the book, from which I shall take the 
liberty of quoting as opportunity offers." 
The work is highly recommended by Pro- 
fessor W. .A. Henry, Dean of the College of 
.Agriculture and director of the Wisconsin 
Agricultural Experiment Station, who says: 
" This work cannot help proving a genuine 
addition to our limited list of agricultural 
books of real merit." Professor H. J. Wa- 
ters, professor in the Pennsylvania .Agricult- 
ural College, says; " It was during his en- 
gagement with the dairy school of the Penn- 
sylvania State College that Mr. Gurler was 
finally induced to put in book form the re- 
sults of his years of experience, careful 
thought and research in dairying. -' ■■■ ■■ 
I note with great pleasure the favorable 
impression it is making and the great atten- 
tion it is attracting." D. W. Wilson, sec- 
retary of the National Dairy Union, writes: 
" The great advantage of this work at the 
present time, it seems to me, will be the 
fact that Mr. Gurler has been at the front 
in all the progress and advancement of the 
dairy for the last twenty-five years." Many 
other agricultural papers mention the clear, 
concise and unambiguous terms used b}- Mr. 
Gurler. The following are words of praise 
from ex-Governor Hoard: 



THE BIOC.KAPHICAL KECOKU. 



•■ One of the most notable tilings in i:un- 
nection with practical dairying durin,;; the 
present ' i S95) year is the pnblicatioii of a 
]irartiral treatise on that subject 1)\- a man 
of wide experience, trained judgment and 
skilled common sense. It treats every phase 
of the question from the breeding and selec- 
tion of the cow to the final marketing of the 
finished product. •■ ■'■ ■•■ We ha\e read 
the book with great care — much of it more 
than once- and the more we read it the bet- 
ter we liked it. .\s a literary production it 
is almost equal to Grant's Memoirs, st) im- 
affected is its diction, so direct and simple 
its sentences, so candid in e\ery utterance. 
He writes of what he knows, of what he has 
seen and tried, and unlike many writers of 
books, he has ihe lare gift of omitting the 
superfinous and uncertain. Haxing been in 
personal business contact with every branch 
of the subject for many years — growing the 
fodder, feeding and milking the cows, cream- 
ing the milk and churning and marketing 
the butter in the private dairy and in the 
(-reamery — his experience as an instructor 
in the dairy schools of Wisconsin, X'ermont 
and Pennsylvania has taught him what to 
say and how to say it. The result is that 
he has given us the best book on dairjing 
that was ever written, not too learned or 
technical for the beginner, nor too verbose 
or commonplace for the scientist, the expert 
or the editor. The publishers (J. H. San- 
ders Publishing Company, C~hicagoi ha\e 
done their part well, as well in the matter 
of price (one dollar 1 as in t)pograph\- antl 
press work. .\t least ten thousand dairy 
farmers and butter makers should read this 
book during the coming winter. " 

Henry B. Curler was one of the board 
of reviewing judges for dairying machinery 
at the Columbian Exposition. He was also 



judge of the butter in the breed contest at 
the same exposition. Xo man was better 
fitteil for the positions and no man ga\e bet- 
ter satisfaction. More than once Mr. C.in-- 
ler's rare discriminating powers were tested 
in that the same butter was presented for 
competition under two names, or, in other 
words, the same man \\ould send two pack- 
ages, one to compete with the other. In 
each case Mr. Curler would detect the fraud 
and classify the butter where it belonged. 
He was twice elected president of the Illi- 
nois Dair}' Association, refusing to take a 
third term. For several years he was treas- 
urer of the Northwestern Dairy Associa- 
tion at the time ex-Governor Hoard was its 
president. He has represented the dairy 
interests of Illinois on the hlxperiment Sta- 
tion Board of Control continuously since 
its organization under the Hatch law in 

Not only is Mr. Curler authority (jn 
dairying, but also on buildings where cows 
are kept. The representatives of the \\'is- 
consiii l'2xperimental and .\gricultural Sta- 
tion, after visiting the United States and 
Canada for ideas to incorporate in their new 
barns and row stables, patterned after those 
of Mr. Curler. 

On the 27th of .March, iSr,;, Mr. Cur- 
ler was imited in marriage with Miss Selenia 
Kolfe. a native of England and a daughter 
of George Rolfe. of De Kalb county. By 
this union were three children, two of 
whom are now li\ing: Stella V.. now Mrs. 
Lundberg. and Eulu May. 

Fraternally Mr. Ciurler is a member of the 
(^irand .Army of the Republic and was the 
first commander of Merritt Simonds Post, 
Xo. 283. He is also a member of the Ma- 
sonic iraternit\'. of the blue lodge and chap- 
ter at He Kail). While residing in Afton 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



329 



township he served as a member of the 
board of school trustees and since removinj; 
to De Kalb has served as a member of the 
board of education, and also as a member 
of the city council. In whatever position 
he has been called on t<i fill, he has dis- 
charged the duties faithfull}' and well. As 
a business man he has met with un(iualilied 
success and as a citizen he is held in the 
highest esteem. 



EUGENE O. DONXELLV, who resides 
upon a fine farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres in section 8, Afton township, De 
Kalb county, Illinois, is a native of the city 
of Dublin, Ireland, born January i, 1S52, 
and is the son of John and Sarah (Farrell) 
Donnelly, both of whom were also natives 
of the Green Isle. They were the parents 
of two children, Eugene O., our subject, 
and Mary, who married George Nelson and 
now resides in Osage county, Kansas. In 
1 864 the family came to America and located 
in De Kalb county, Illinois, where the father 
followed agricultural pursuits. 

Our subject was but twelve years of age 
when he accompanied his parents to the 
United States and during his minority 
assisted in the cultivation of the home farm, 
and as the opportunity was afforded him at- 
tending the district schools. On the loth 
of January, 1S83, he was united in marriage 
with Miss Margaret Horan, a native of 
Pierce township, De Kalb county, Illinois, 
and by this union are three children, Mary, 
John and Sarah. Soon after his marriage 
he purchased the farm on which he now re- 
sides and began its further improvement. 
His wife, who was a consistent member of 
the Catholic church, died in 1889. On the 



3rd of April, 1893, Mr. Donnelly was again 
married, choosing as his companion Mrs. 
Elizabeth (Lyons) Findley, a native of De 
Kalb county, and they ha\e now three chil- 
dren, Martin, Elizabeth and liugene. 

In politics Mr. Donnelly is a Democrat. 
He has been htniured by his fellow citizens 
with \arious township offices, including 
commissioner of highways, a position which 
he has held several terms. Fraternally he 
is a member of the Modern Woodmen of 
.America and religiously is a Catholic. As 
a farmer he has been (juite successful and 
e\er keeps his farm under a high state of 
culti\ation, making of it one of the best in 
the township. As a citizen he is deservedly 
held in high esteem. 



SILAS R. CA?^IPBELL, deceased, who 
for man\- years was a well-known 
farmer in Sycamore township, was born in 
Chenango county. New York, March 31, 
1833, and was the son of John K. and Clar- 
inda ( Marvin j Campbell, who came from 
New York to De Kalb county, about 1853, 
the former dying in Sycamore township, at 
the age of eighty-one years, and the latter 
when eighty-two years old. 

The subject of this sketch spent his 
boyhood and youth in his native state, 
where he was educated in the common 
schools. He came with his parents in 1853, 
and remained with them until after he at- 
tained his majority. He was twice married, 
his first union being with Mrs. Mary Ham- 
mond, who died in 1866. They were the 
parents of four children, all of whom are de- 
ceased. 

The second union of Mr. Campbell was 
solemnized Januar}' I, 1868, when he mar- 



330 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ried Miss Phcebe Catherine Winans, a native 
of Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, born 
Auf^ust 13, 1S44, and a daufjhter of Isaac 
and Betsy (Christy) Winans, both of whom 
were natives of Pennsyb/ania. Her father 
come west in 1846, and settled in Mayfield 
township, where he lived one year, and 
then removed to another farm in the same 
township, a little farther west, where he re- 
mained some six or eight years. He then 
moved to the city of Sycamore, and there 
resided some two or three years, after wliich 
he purchased a farm on section 21, Syca- 
more township, and there resided until his 
death in the spring of 1861, when about 
fifty years old. His wife survived him 
many years, d\ ing in Burlington township, 
Kane county, Jul\- 1, 1898, at the age oi 
eighty-eight years. The)' were the parents 
of ten children, as follows: Philetus P., 
living in Kane county; James D., deceased; 
Harriet M., wife of Gilbert \'an Duseii; 
Edward R., living in Marengo, Illinois; Clark 
A., residing in Sycamore; Phcebe C. , widow 
of our subject; George W. , who died in 
Mayfield township, De Kalb county; Thirza 
J., wife of Thomas Fathergill; Jeremiah O., 
residing in Marengo, Illinois; and Susan, 
who died in childhood. 

To our subject and wife five children ha\e 
been born, (i) Rufus Allen, born March 
10. 1S69, died October g, 1S97. Frater- 
nally he was a member of the Modern 
Wixjdmen of .\merica. (2i Leon Murray, 
bcu'ii July 22, 1870, married .\lice Olsen, by 
whom he lias two children, Esther May and 
Helen Irene. He is now engaged in farm- 
ing in Sycamore township. (3) Libbie An- 
geline, born August 19, 1873, married Rob- 
ert [. |. Montgomery, and they have two 
rhildreii. Robert J. J. and William McKin- 
le\. riiev nsidc in Kane couiitw Illinois. 



(4) Mary Maude married Harry Drew, and 
they reside on the farm with Mrs. Campbell. 

(5) Horace Wilson, at present living in 
Colorado, working for the Chicago Portrait 
Company. He is a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America. 

In politics Mr. Campbell was a Repub- 
lican, but not specially acti\e part in political 
affairs. He was a man that devoted his at- 
tention to his farming interests, and to the 
welfare ol his family. His death in January, 
1 88 5, was mourned b\- a large circle of friends. 
Mrs. Campbell, who still remains upon the 
farm, is a woman that is greatly esteemed. 
She is a member of the Charter Grove 
Methodist Episcopal church, and also of 
the Daughters of the Globe, and Ladies of 
the Maccabees. 



NELSON SIVWRIGHT, now living a 
retired life on his farm in section 15, 
Mayfield township, has been a resident of 
De Kalb county since 1848. He is a native 
of Nova Scotia, born November 26, 1839, 
and is the son of .\le.\ander Sivwright, 
also a native of Nova Scotia, born February 
22, 1800. His grandfather, James Siv- 
wright, was a native of Scotland, and, in 
1776, enlisted in the British army, and 
ser\ed against the Americans in the Rev- 
olutionary war. He was with the British in 
the battle of Bunker Hill, and was later 
taken prisoner in Connecticut, and held for 
eighteen months, when he was exchanged 
and fought against the French in the West 
Indies. Subsequently he settled in Nova 
Scotia, and there married. 

.\lexander Sivwright was reared in his 
nati\e country and there married Mary Kil- 
cup, also a nati\e of Nova Scotia. \\'hile 
residing in his nati\e land he engaged in 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



331 



farming- for some years. Desirinj; to better 
his condition in life, lie came to De Kalb 
county, Illinois, in 184S, and purchased 
eighty acres of land on section 15, Mayheld 
township, forty acres of which had been 
broken, and a log house had been erected 
on the place. On that farm he continued 
to reside during the remainder of his life, his 
death occurring August 22, 1886. His wife 
died July iS, 1885, and both were laid to 
rest in the Ma_\ field cemetery. Of their five 
children, Nelson and his brother James are 
the only survivors. 

Nelson Sivwright came to De Kalb coun- 
ty, a lad of nine years, and assisted in the 
cultivation of the home farm until after he 
attained his majority, receiving a \'ery lim- 
ited education. After arriving at mature 
years, he continued working with his father 
for several years, and on the i8th of June, 
1868, he was united in marriage with Miss 
Lucinda Lucas, a native of Ogle county, 
Illinois, and a daughter of Annas Lucas, a 
pioneer of that count}', who made settle- 
ment there in 1837 and engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits. The maiden name of 
Mrs. Sivwi ight's grandmother was Susan 
White, and she traces her ancestry back to 
one White who came over in the Mayflower. 
Mrs. Lucas has a silver watch brought over 
by her original ancestor. The watch has a 
slip on case showing that it was repaired in 
London in 1600, and has been an heirloom 
in the family all these years. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Si\- 
wright commenced their domestic life on 
the old homestead and as the years went 
by he added to the original eighty by pur- 
chasing the interests of other heirs, and he 
has now two hundred and thirteen acres, all 
well improved and valuable land. For 
years he was regarded as one of the most 



enterprising and successful farmers in the 
township. To Mr. and Mrs. Sivwright two 
children were born, Alice and John G. The 
former married Herman Rand, a farmer of 
Mayfield township, while the latter yet re- 
mains at home, and is a student of the 
home schools. Politically Mr. Sivwright 
\\as formerly a Republican, but on account 
of his interest in the temperance cause he 
has for several years been an advocate and 
an earnest supporter of the Prohibition party. 
He served twenty-three consecutive years 
as justice of the peace, three consecutive 
years as supervisor, and was later re-elec ed 
to the latter office and served two addi- 
tional terms. While on the board he was 
for a time chairman of the committee on 
fees and salaries, and served on the com- 
mittee for equalizing assessments and was 
on other important committees. For sev- 
eral years he served as to\\'nship trustee. 
He has always given his support and influ- 
ence to secure good schools and good teach- 
ers. Religiously he is a member of the 
Wesleyan Methodist church, with which he 
has been connec'.ed for forty years. His 
wife is also a member of that body and for 
some years they were \"er}' active in the 
church work. .A u-ell-known resident of 
Mayfield township, he is highh' respected 
for his many excellent qualities and his de- 
sire to be always found in the right. 



ABRAHAM D. GRAVES is the owner 
of a fine farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres on section 30, Franklin township. He 
is a native of Maine, born April 25, 1826, 
and is the son of Nathaniel and Anna J. 
fYoung) Graves, the former a native of 
Massachusetts and the latter of Lewiston. 
Maine. They were the parents of nine 



THE BIOCiKAPHICAL KECOKD. 



chiUlren; Abraham I)., Andrew J., Julia 
1... Julius 11., Anna Augusta, Elvira T., 
\esta A., Hannah, and Nathaniel Erank- 
lin. The paternal grandfather, Nathaniel 
Gra\es, was also a native of Massachusetts, 
and by trade was a blacksmith. He moved 
to Maine in 1790, where his death occurred 
at the age of sixty years. The maternal 
grandfathrr, Kev. Abraham I). Yunng, was a 
natnc nf Maim-, a farmer and nnnister in 
the Christian church. The Graves are of 
English descent, and \\erc carl\- settlers in 
America. 

In his nati\e state our subject spent his 
boyhood and }outh, and received a limited 
education in the common schools. In 1845 
he came to Illinois with his parents, who 
stopped in Boone county till the following 
spring. In i S4C he accompanied them to 
Ogle county, and in 1 848 came with them 
to De Kail) county, when they located on 
the farm where he \et resides Nathaniel 
Graves, the father, was for )ears a prom- 
inent citizen of Franklin township, where 
he served as road commissioner and in 
other local offices. He is still living at the 
age of ninety-seven years. After coming 
to Illinois our subject followed teaching 
for about twelve years, receiving at first a 
compensation of ten dollars per month. 
That salary was obtained during the wuiters 
of 1845-6. On the 13th of April, 1850, he 
married Miss Salina I.-. Churchill, a nati\e 
of New York and a daughter of Olner and 
Pantha L. (Andrews) Churchill, both na- 
tives of New York, and who were the par- 
ents of six children, the first dying in in- 
fancy. The others were Salina, Stephen 
D., Charles C. , Edwin and Darwin. Of 
Ihese Stephen I), and U.irwin are drceased. 
To our sidiject and wife eight children were 
born, Eveline S. , Fred E., Fantha E., 



Charles S., Nathaniel A., Amos C, Bert E. 
and John. 

For about live years, after coming to 
De Kalb county, Mr. Graves engaged in 
breaking prairie during the spring and sum- 
mer seasons and followed teaching during 
the winter. He then followed farming and 
teaching for some years, but of late has 
gi\en his time exclusi\el\' tcj his farming 
o()erati(>ns. His farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres is always kejit under the highest 
state of cultivation, and shows that it is 
controlled by a master mind. In politics 
he is an ardent Republican, and has served 
as township assessor one year, township 
clerk ten years, and township treasurer six- 
teen years. He is a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. In e\er_\- position 
called upon to till, he has discharged the 
duties to the entire satisfaction of those in- 
terested. 



NOKMAN C. WAKKEN, residing in the 
city of Sycamore, "'as born in the 
town of Jordanville, Herkimer county. New 
York, June g, 1835. His father, Kussel! 
Warren, was born in the town of Warren, 
Herkimer county. New York, F"ebruary 4, 
1799. He married Sophia H. Cleland, also 
a native of New York, born June 14, 1798. 
Their marriage was solemnized F^ebruary 6, 
181S. She was a daughter of Norman and 
Wealthy Cleland. Her death occurred 
March 30, 1837. Russell \^'arre^ was by 
occupation a farmer, and in politics he was 
a stanch Whig. He died in Jordan\ille, 
New York, October i, 1850. He was the 
son of Lemuel Warren, a farmer born March 
23, i-6y, and whn marri.'d Ra.hfl Wudcll. 
To Russell and Sophia II. Warren >ix chil- 
dren were born, four daughters and two 




N. C. WARREN. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



335 



sons, viz.: Wealthy M., J. Albert, Harriet 
.\., Francis C, Marrietta S., ui wiioin our 
subject was the last, and is now the only 
one living. 

The subject of this sketch grew to man- 
hood in his native state, and at Charlotte- 
\ille, Schoharie county, New York, and at 
Cooperston, Otsego county, received his 
education. In his youth he commenced 
clerking in a store in Herkimer county, at 
which occupation he continued until the 
fall of 1855, when he came to Sycamore 
and went into the grocery business, continu- 
ing in that line until 1862, at the same time 
dealing in boots and shoes. He then went 
into the produce business, which proved un- 
usually successful. He continued in that 
business until about 1886, and had an in- 
terest in a hardware business at the same 
time under the firm name of \\'arren i.\: Ell- 
wood which he later sold. 

Mr. Warren was married in Sycamore, 
May 8, 1862, to Miss Addie B. Brown, a na- 
tive of Sycamore and a daughter of Charles 
and Caroline (Dodgej Brown, the former a 
native of German Flats, Herkimer county, 
New York, born January 14, [812, and who 
died in Sycamore July g, 1895. (Seesketch 
of Charles Brown on another page of this 
work.) By this union one son was born, 
Albert S. , who attended the Sycamore 
schools, finishing his education at the Fari- 
bault, Minnesota, Military College and Be- 
loit College, at Beloit, Wisconsin. He is 
at present residing in St. Louis, Missouri, 
in the employ of the Crane Manufacturing 
Company, manufacturers of elevators and 
agricultural implements. 

Since 1886 Mr, Warren has in a meas- 
ure retired from active business but slill has 
interests in various lines, being at present 
the president of the Hughes County Bank 



in Blunt, South Dakota, where he also owns 
fifteen hundred acres nf line farming lands. 
He has alsci a line farm near Sycamore, to 
which he gives jjersoual attention. In poli- 
tics he is a Republican, and although he 
takes an active interest in political affairs 
he has had no desire for ofiice holding, but, 
howe\-er, he was once prevailed upon to 
serve two 3'ears as alderman from his ward. 
For nearly half a centur\' Mr. Warren 
has been a resident of De Kalb rcjunty. 
Coming in his \outh and with but little 
capital, with a persistence born of a resolute 
purpose, he has succeeded well in life. As 
a business man he has ever been enterpris- 
ing, and has almost intuitively been able to 
foresee the situation and be upon the right 
side of the market. 



REUBEN J. HOLCOMB, e.x-sheriff, and 
now deputy sheriff of De Kalb count}', 
was born in the town of Machias, Catta- 
raugus count)', New York, September 27, 
1839, and came to De Kalb county, Illinois, 
with his parents in 1842. There were 
seven families in the party coming through 
from New York and they were si.x weeks 
on the road, arriving on the i6th of June. 
Notwithstanding his tender age, many inci- 
dents of the trip are remembered by our 
subject. At the time of his arrival there 
were only six or seven houses in Sycamore. 
The Holcomb famil\' in America trace 
their descent tn Thomas Holcomb, who 
came from London, England, to America 
about two hundred and fifty years ago. 
Orator Holcomb, the grandfather of our 
subject, was born in Danbury, Connecticut. 
He married Hainiah Terry, also a native of 
Connecticut, and shdrtly after thc-ir mar- 
riage they moved to Erie county. New 



5iO 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



York, and later, in 1S05, to the town of Can- 
andafjua, Genesee comity, New York, 
where he reared a larj^e family. He came 
west in 1S42 with his sons and shortly aft- 
er\\ar<is died, being the first to be interred 
in the new Sycamore cemetery. He died 
at the age of seventy-five years. Shortly 
after his death his wife retnrned to New 
York, where later her death occurred. 

Eleming Holcomb, the father of our 
subject, was born in Genesee count}'. New 
York, and there married Louisa Stone, a 
native of Pollett, \"ermont, and a daughter 
of Hiram and Ann (Long) Stone. They be- 
came the parents of seven children, four of 
whom are yet living. Maurice, who at one 
time served as sheriff of De Kalb county, 
now resides in Fargo, North Dakota. 
Reuben J. is the subject of this sketch. 
Orator S. , who is also an ex -sheriff of De 
Kalb county, makes his home in Sycamore. 
Ellen is now the wife of Arthur M. Start, 
and they now reside in Chicago. One son, 
Lynns, \\'as killed at the battle of .\verys- 
boro. North Carolina, during the Ci\'il war. 

By trade Fleming Holcomb was a 
shoemaker, which occupation he followed 
in connection with farming, during almost 
his entire life In coming to Illinois, it was 
his intention to engage in farming, but as 
money was scarce in this new country, he 
made his trade a source of revenue b\' 
n)anufacturing boots and shoes for the set- 
tlers. He continued to work at his trade 
until his family insisted on his abandoning 
it by reason of his feeble health. He was 
a man of strong will and kept working at 
his bench long after he should have aban- 
doned it. On arriving in De Kalb county, 
he purchased a claim of one hundred and 
twenty acres, eighty acres of which he held 
nntd his death. In politics he was a Re- 



publican, and religiously a Universalist in 
belief and a regular attendant at church. .\ 
strong temperance man, he was for some 
time associated with the Good Templars. 
During his entire life it is said that he was 
never guilty of using profane language. 
He died at the age of fifty-five years. 

The subject of this sketch attended the 
district schools until the age of fourteen 
\'ears, in addition to which he attended one 
term at a select school in Sycamore, under 
Dr. W'oodwanl. When of age. he took a 
trip through central Illinois, in search of a 
better location, but found none better than 
De Kalb county. Returning to Sycamore, 
he clerked in a store until the fall of 1861, 
and spent the following winter at school. 
In the spring of 1862 he engaged as a clerk 
in a grocer\' store, where he remained until 
the .-\ugust following, when he enlisted in 
Company .\. One Hundred and Fifth Illinois 
\'olunteer Infantry, and was mustered into 
the service at Dixon, Illinois, and later 
sent to Chicago, where the regiment drilled 
for a few weeks. It was then sent to Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, and joined in the race after 
Morgan's cavalry. His first battle was at 
Burnt Hickor\-, Georgia. With his regi- 
ment he was then in the Atlanta campaign 
and with Sherman on the march to the sea 
He was at Raleigh, North Carolina, when 
Lee surrendered. The regiment was then 
ordered to \\'ashington and was in the 
grand revit■^\■. It was mustered nut at Chi- 
cago in [uly, 1865. Before being discharged 
our subject received permission to come 
home and see his father who was then lying 
very ill. He returned to Chicago where he 
was discharged and again returned home, 
his father dying a few weeks after. 

|ust previous to his enlistment, on the 
27th of August, 1S02, at Sycamore, Illiiuiis, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



337 



Mr. Holcomb was united in marriage with 
Miss Corinna Boardman, who was born near 
Dundee, Kane count}', Illinois, and a daugh- 
ter of Daniel and Tryphena (Mason) Board- 
man. By this union five children ha\-e been 
born, of whom Charles, the first born, and 
Zada B. and Bertie F. are deceased. Jessie 
M. married George P. Fulkerson, a machin- 
ist in the sewing machine factory at Bel- 
videre, Illinois. Minerva E. is housekeeper 
for her father. 

On coming home froui the service. Mr. 
Holcomb worked for a lumber firm in Syca- 
more until the spring of 1866, when he en- 
gaged in the lumber trade himself, in which 
he continued until the fall of 1867, when 
he became deputy in the sheriff's office 
under his brother. He served as deputy 
under each succeeding sheriff until he him- 
self was elected to the office in 1872. He 
was re-elected in 1874, iS76and 1878, since 
which time he has served as deputy, with 
the exception of one term when Mr. Ost- 
rander was sheriff. He is one of the best 
posted men in the count)', and has been 
over every inile of road in every township, 
knows all the leading men in the county, and 
during his long term of thirty-one years in th e 
sheriff's officehas made many friends. He is a 
detective of recognized ability and has run 
to earth many criminals. .\t one time he 
was employed by the authorities in Te.xas 
t(j take charge of a case, bringing a mur- 
derer to justice. He went to Wyoming and 
as a cowbo}' traveled over the territory, 
found his man, arrested and took him back 
where he was tried and convicted. 



w 



LIAM B. WEDDELL is now liv- 
ig a retired life in the village of 
llo, De Kalb coinitw He is a nati\'e of 



Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, born 
March 8, 1824, and is a son of Jesse Wed- 
dell, a native of the same county and state, 
born in 1778, and who was a soldier in the 
war of I Si 2. The paternal grandfather, 
Peter Weddell, was also a native of Penn- 
sylvania, locating in Westmoreland county 
in 1757. The Weddell fan.ily were early 
settlers of eastern Pennsylvania, where 
Peter Weddell spent the greater part of his 
time in hunting. Jesse Weddell was reared 
in Westmoreland county, and there married 
Nancy Davis, also a native of that county. 
He was a prominent farmer in Westmore- 
land county, where he was well known. In 
the fall of 1831 he moved to Elkhart 
county, Indiana, becoming one of the first 
settlers of that county. In 1828 he came 
west looking for a location, and was on the 
present site of Chicago. Liking that coun- 
try better, he settled in Elkhart county, 
Indiana, and there died in 183S, when our 
subject was a lad of fourteen years. After 
his death the widow reared the family and 
gave them the best opportunity for advance- 
ment in life that the country afforded. 
They were the parents of five sons and four 
daughters, all of whom, with the exception 
of the youngest son, growing to man and 
womanhood. Of these, two sons and two 
daughters are j'et living, James E. resides 
in Elkhart county, Indiana. .Agnes Hedges 
resides in Aspen, Colorado. Mrs. Elizabeth 
Barnard resides in Georgetown, Colorado. 
William B. is the subject of this review. 

William B. Weddell was reared in Elk- 
hart county, Indiana, and there remained 
until 1850, when he came to De Kalb 
county and purchased the land where he 
now resides, entering two hundred and forty 
acres with a land warrant. After making 
his location he returned to Elkhart county 



TH1-: BIOGKAPHICAL KIXOKD. 



and there tnarriei], Jimuary 2, 1850, Af^nes 
G. \"ail, u native of Fayette county, Penn- 
sylvania, and a .lau^'hter of Cliarles and 
Nancy (JelTriesj \'ail, lioth of whom were 
also natives of I"a}ette county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and early settlers of lilkhart county, 
Indiana. Soon after his marriage Mr. Wed- 
dell settled in De Kalb county and built a 
small house, which in due time ga\e place 
to a more pretentious one. F'rom time to 
time he added to his possessions until he 
was the owner of four hundred and forty 
acres, all in one farm, and was one of the 
most active farmers and stock raisers in De 
Kalb county. On his farm he laid out the 
village of RoUo and has since built a large, 
neat and substantial resi(ience, in which the 
family now reside. 

Mrs. Weddell died November 16, 1S81. 
leaving three children. Nanc\' Ann is the 
wife of E. B. Powers, a fariPicr of Paw Paw 
township. Charles \'. is one of the sub- 
stantial farmers of the township and owns 
and operates a farm adjoining that of his 
father. Mrs. Elma Agnes Fraser is a widow- 
residing in Kollo Mr. Weddell has one great- 
grandson, Meffhn C. Bullis, born May 15. 
189S, in Paw Paw township, De I-ialb count} . 
For his second wife Mr. Weddell, October 
2y, i88y, married Mrs. Cleora Burns, /n't- 
Hyde, a native of \'ermont. Her father, 
Jonathan Hyde, was also a native of \'er- 
mont, born at l>ennington, of English an- 
cestry, the family dating back to William 
Hyde, who settled in Connecticut in 1O37, 
and died in Norwich, that state. Jonathan 
Hyde married Phebe P. Fillmore, a nati\c 
of Norwich, Connecticut. They were mar- 
ried in Clinton county, New York, but after 
their marriage resided in Vermont a mim- 
ber of years, l)ut in 1 S ^i relumed to Clin- 
ton county. New York, where they remained 



until 1845 and then came west and in 1846 
settled III Paw Paw township, De Kail. 
count\-, where he s|)eiit the last years of his 
life, dying about 1864. He was a promi- 
nent man in this county and held several 
local positions of trust and honor. Mrs. 
Weddell was educated in Cha;i;y, Clinton 
countv. New York, where she engaged in 
teaching. She came to Illinois in 1847, 
where she continued teaching for about 
three years. In 1849 she gave her hand in 
marriage to Thomas ISurns, who was an 
early settler from Cayuga county. New York. 
He entered land and opened up a farm in 
Paw Paw township and there remained until 
1852, when he removeil to California, tak- 
ing the o\erland route. He located in El- 
dorado county, and ff.r some years en- 
gaged in mining and fruit raising. He died 
there in 1875. They were the parents of 
six children. Ellen Cleora died at the age 
of eighteen years. Mary C. is the wife of 
Charles W'orth, of Aurora, Illinois. Thomas 
Elliott died at the age of eighteen \ears. 
.Agnes is the wife of Charles Goeble, of 
California. Margaret is the wife of Will- 
iam Shry, of California. Robert Simeon 
married, and now resides in Paw Paw town- 
ship. After residing in California for thirty 
\ears, in 1882, Mrs. Burns returned to De 
Kalb county, and as stated was united in 
marriage with Mr. Weddell. 

Politically Mr. Weddell was originally a 
Whig, and cast his first presidential vote for 
Zachary Taylor. He supported Fremont in 
1856 and has since been an earnest advo- 
cate of Republican principles. He has 
never desired official position, but served 
twelve years as a commissioner of high- 
ways. In the fall of 1892, in company 

and (Jregon, where they spent alHjiiL two 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



339 



months visitiiif;- on the Pacific slope. They 
are both active members of the Rollo Con- 
grefjRtional church, Mr. Weddell being one 
(jf tlie cirio;inaI members when the chiircli 
was organized in 1S64. He was one of the 
trustees of the church and gave the lot on 
which the house of worship was erected. 
He was made a Master Mason about 1863, 
at Paw Paw, and is now an Ancient Mason. 
Both he and his wife are held in the highest 
esteem bv all who know them. 



QHUBAEL TERRY ARMSTRONG, 
O circuit clerk of De Kalb county, was 
born in Chautauqua county. New York, De- 
cember 14, 1834, and is the son of Dr. 
Thomas and Johanna (Terry) Armstrong, 
both of Washington county. New York. 
David Armstrong, the paternal grandfather, 
was a native of the North of Ireland, born 
in 1763. He came to America in 1800, and 
here married Elizabeth Creighton in Amer- 
ica, but of Scotch parentage. He died in 
De Kalb county, at the age of ninety-eight 
years. All through his life he followed the 
vocation of a farmer. Thomas Armstrong, 
the father, was born May 8, 1806. Graduat- 
ing from the Medical College of ]>iiffalu. 
New York, he practiced his profession dur- 
ing the remainder of his life. While yet 
residing in New York, he served in the 
United States volunteers to prevent Ameri- 
cans from joining the insurgents during the 
patriot war in Canada. His wife, Johanna 
Terry, was a daughter of Shubael and Re- 
becca (Hathaway) Terry, who lived to be 
si.\ty-si.\ and eighty-eight \'ears respect- 
i\'ely. The Terrys first came to America 
in 1660 and passed with honor through the 
colonial period, some of whom doubtlessly 
took an active part in the colonial wars. 



Dr. Armstrong died in Sandwich, Illi- 
nois, in October, 18S8, at the age of eighty- 
two years. His wife died when but sixty- 
six years old. 

Shortly after the birth of our subject, 
the family moved to Erie county. New York, 
where they lived until he was seventeen 
years old. After attending the common 
schools in Erie county, he finished his edu- 
cation in the academies at Springville and 
P'redonia, New York. In 1852 the family 
removed to Rock county, Wisconsin. B\' 
lake they went from Buffalo to Detroit on 
the first passenger trip of the famous 
steamer. Lady Elgin, that later went down 
on Lake Michigan, with her hundreds of 
passengers. From Detroit they went to 
Chicago on the first passenger train running 
into that city from the east. From Chicago 
they went to Milwaukee by lake, thence to 
Rock county by wagon. In the family of 
Dr. and Mrs. Armstrong were six children, 
four of whom are now living: William, liv- 
ing in Hickory county, Missouri; Shubael 
T., our subject; David, livingin Kansas City, 
.Missouri; and Anna, wife of Solon White, 
of Sandwich, Illinois-. 

The subject of this sketch remained at 
home until his marriage, in Rock county, 
Wisconsin, December 14, 1855, to Miss 
Eunice E. Richardson, a native of Catta- 
raugus county. New York, and a daughter 
of John K. and Eunice Thompson (Curtis) 
Richardson, the former born in Washington 
county, New York, July 29, 1799. He was 
a carpenter and joiner by trade, and came 
west during the early settlement of Wiscon- 
sin, locating in Rock county. He was a 
Universalist in religious belief. During the 
war of 1 81 2 he served his countr}' faithfully 
and well. His death occurred September 
15, li^jf). He was the son of David Rich- 



340 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ardson, who died of typhoid fever in 1813, 
at the age of seventy-seven years. The 
wife of the latter was a Miss Sweetland, 
who died in 1820. Eunice Thompson Cur- 
tis was born near Bennington, Vermont, in 
1805, and died in Rock county. Wisconsin, 
at the age of eighty-one years. She was 
the daughter of Zerubabel Curtis, who 
settled in an early day near the village of 
Malone, New York, that place now cover- 
ing the site of his old farm. Zerubabel Cur- 
tis married Esther Thompson, a native of 
Scotland, who attained the age of ninety- 
eight years. He also ser\-ed in the war of 
1S12, and was in the battle of Plattsburg. 

Soon after his marriage, Mr. Armstrong 
mo\ed to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he 
engaged in railroading and civil engineering 
for the Northwestern Railway and the Chi- 
cago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad. In 
1861 he went to California, as mining engi- 
neer and was eniplo\ed at the famous Coni- 
stock mine, the Reese River mine and other 
noted mines. In December, 1864, he re- 
turned to Rock county, Wisconsin, where 
he remained until 1868, and then moved to 
Milan township, De Kalb county, Illinois, 
where he engaged in farming for four years, 
teaching school during the winter months. 
In 1872 he mo\ed to Sycamore, where he 
engaged in surveying and railioad civil en- 
gineering. He also ser\ ed for a considera- 
ble length of time as deputy county clerk 
and deputy county treasurer. In 1890 he 
was elected circuit clerk and re-elected in 
1892 and 1894, a position which he still 
holds, to the satisfaction of every one hav- 
ing business with the office. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Armstrong se\-en chil- 
dren have been born. Hattie G. is the wife 
of Albert A. Bishop, of Sibley, Iowa. Lo- 
retta Mav is an artist of fine ability and a 



teacher in the art department at Waterman 
Hall. In the summer of 1898 she studied 
in the College of Design in Chicago, and 
also under private teachers. Anna is de- 
ceased. Elizabeth is the wife of Harry H. 
Everitt, now of Chicago, who was for a 
number of years a teacher of physical cult- 
ure in the State University at Champaign, 
Illinois. Carlotta is the wife of Park Rich- 
mond, a business man of Chicago. Nevada 
is serving as deputy under her father in the 
office of circuit court. Arthur is deceased. 
Politically Mr. Armstrong has been a 
life-long Republican, having attained his 
majority in time to cast his vote for the first 
presidential nominee of the party. General 
John C. I-'remont. Fraternally he is a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lovvs, holding membership with the subordi- 
nate lodge, encampment, and uniformed 
rank of Patriarchs Militant. He is also a 
member of the Masonic fraternity and has 
always taken a prominent part in conferring 
the degrees, being an e.xcellent lecturer. 
As an official he is always accommodating 
and ever ready to confer a favor upon any 
one having business with the office. As a 
citizen he is enterprising and his friends are 
many throughout De Kalb county and 
where\'er known. 



GEORGE J. MAURER, who is a retired 
farmer residing in the village of Malta, 
was born in Germany October 13, 1835, 
and is the son of P'rederick and Christine 
Maurer, both of whom were nati\es of Ger- 
man\', where they resided until death. They 
were people of respectability and worth)- of 
the esteem they enjoyed. The former 
diet! in 1840 and the latter in 1S53. She 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



341 



was his second wife and our subject was 
second in order of birth b}' the last union. 

George J. Maurer remained at home in 
his native land until seventeen years of age, 
in the meantime receiving a fairly good edu- 
cation, and learning the trade of shoe- 
maker, which he followed more or less at 
various times after his emigration to Amer- 
ica in 1S52. He left Germany October 6, 
of that year, by way of Havre, France, and 
arrived in New ^'ork forty-seven days later. 
He then went to Rome, Oneida county. 
New York, where his brother, John, was 
then residing, and there remained three 
years, si.x months of which time he worked 
at his trade. In 1855 he came west and 
located in Pierce township, De Kalb county, 
Illinois, where he turned his attention to 
agricultural pursuits. In 1856 he went t(j 
Big Rock townsliip, Kane county, Illinois, 
where he engaged in farming two years, 
then returned to De I\all) county, where he 
spent two years in Clinton township. In 
1866 he purchased eighty acres of land, 
which he improved and on which he re- 
sided for a number of }'ears, selling the 
same to Thomas Delbridge in 1863. The 
same )-ear he purchased one hundred and 
thirty acres, to which twelve years later he 
added forty- eight acres, making him a valu- 
able farm which he now owns on section 5, 
Malta township. 

On December 20, 1862, Mr. Maurer 
married Miss Mary Deih', born in Cook 
county, Ilhnois, January 13, 1841, and a 
daughter of John and Barbara Deily, both 
of whom were natives of Germany, who 
came to this country with tfieir respective 
parents about 1830. Her father was born 
June II, 18 16, and died in 1846, while her 
mother was born in 1819, and is still li\'ing. 
By this union six children were born, of 



whom four are yet living: Frank E., Ida 
M., Helen and Arthur B. The latter i; 
now in Cuba engaged in the Spanish-Ameri- 
can war. The deceased children were 
Philip and Elizabeth B. 

Mr. and Mrs. Maurer are members of 
the German Evangelical church, but attend 
the Methodist Episcopal church in Malta, 
there being no church of their choice at 
that place. They are worthy people and 
held in high esteem. Mr. Maurer is a tirst- 
class farmer in every respect, and all that 
he has he acquired by hard work, economy 
and honesty. He is truly a self-made man. 



GEORGE CLARK, a retired farmer, is 
now residing in the city of I3e Kalb, 
where he is serving as justice of the peace. 
He is one of the few living pioneers of the 
county, which has been his home since 1842, 
a period of fifty-six long years. He was born 
at Royalton, Windsor county, Vermont, 
December 16, 1832, and is the son of 
Arunah and Clarissa i Robinson) Clark, both 
of whom were also natives of \'ermont. By 
trade Arunah Clark was a carpenter, and in 
his younger days followed that vocation. 
\\'ith his family he removed west in 1842, 
and settled in De l\alb tosvnship, De Kalb 
county, Illinois, where he purchased one 
hundred and se\enty-one acres of land in its 
natural state, but which had been settled 
on by a "squatter" before it was sur\eyed 
by the general government. While the 
squatter had no legal claim, his right was 
always respected to the extent of his im- 
provements, and he received a recompense 
to that amount. The father made many 
improvements on the land, but it was left 
to his son, the subject of this sketch, to 
make it complete. He was a highly re- 



342 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



res|)ected in;in in the coiiiiiiiiiiity, ;iinl was 
lionorcil by bcuif; elected justice -f l\w 
peace, as well as to other township offices, 
all of which he filled in the most creditable 
manner. He died from the effects of a fall 
in iS6S, when in his eighty-second year. 
His wife's death occurred in the followinj^ 
year. He was twice married and had se\en 
children by the two marriages, imr subject 
being the second by the last unimi. 

George Clark was but ten years nf age 
when he accompanied his parents to De 
Kalb county, and in the schools of Ue Kalb 
and Sycamr;re he obtained his education. 
When old enough to' labor upon the farm 
he was given his daily task, and continued 
to assist in the cultivatiiju of the home farm 
until after he attained his majority, when 
he took full control of the place. The 
father enjoyed life, remaining on the old 
hi:)me, while the son bore all the responsi- 
bilities. He thus passed his life peacefully 
and quietly away, as already stated. 

The experience of our subject is much 
as other early settlers of De Kalb county. 
He well remembers seeing the Indians on 
their ponies passing along the trail that le(f 
b\- the farm, while their arrow-heads and 
other implements of war and hunting are 
JMinid in abundance on his farm. He was 
united Hi marriage Februar\- i S, I.S5S, with 
Miss Sarah J. Cartwright, a native of De 
Kalb comity, born in 1S41, on what is now 
the county farm, but which at that tnne be- 
longed to her father, James Cartwright, one 
of the pioneers of De Kalb county. Dy this 
uniciii two children have lieeii born: James .A. 
and Florence J. The former is a practic- 
ing physician and surgeon at Chicago. The 
latter, after taking a full course at Normal, 
Illinois, has been teaching school in De Kail). 

After rosidinu upon his farm for fifty 



years, in iSy^ Mr. Clark removed to the 
city ..f De Kalb, where he enjoys the full 
confidence of his fellow citi;?ens, who have 
elected him to the office of the justice of 
the peace. Politically he is a Republican, 
and is a firm believer in the principles of 
the party. His long residence in De Kalb 
county has brought him in contact with 
man\' of its best citizens, and wherever best 
known he is the most highly esteemed. 



SAMUEL H. STILES is a retired farmer 
and capitalist residing in Genoa. He 
was born in the town of Naples, Ontario 
county. New \'ork, January 5, 1829, and is 
the son of Epaphroditus and Roxanna (Lin- 
coln) Stiles, the latter liorn near Saratoga, 
New "S'ork, and a daughter of Henfy Lin- 
coln, who participated in the taking of 
Fort Ticonderoga. Epaphroditus Stiles 
was a large farmer and merchant, who had 
studied law and engaged to some extent in 
l(3cal practice. For many years he was a 
justice of the peace and held other official 
positions. He died when our subject was 
but five years of age. His father, Samuel 
Stiles, who was of Scotch and English de- 
scent, served in the I^e\olutionary war and 
lost a leg in the sers'ice. He lived to be a 
very old man. Of the seven children of the 
parents of our subject, two only are li\ing, 
Samuel H. and E\\/.n. wife of J. H. \\'ood, 
of Salem, Oregon. 

Samuel H. Stiles was reared in his native 
county, and attended the subscription schools 
at a time when the school-house was built of 
logs, with puncheon fioor and benches. 
Teachers were hardly up to the grade now 
required and usuallv received a salary of but 
ten dollars per month. At the age of fifteen 
he began life for himself, workintj a farm on 




SAMUEL H. STILES. 




MRS. S. H. STILES. 



THE BIOrxRAPHICAL RECORD. 



347 



shares. In November, 1849, in North Brew- 
ster, New York, he was united in marriage 
with Charlotte Sherratt.a nati\e of Pen Yan, 
New York, who died in November 1886. Tiie 
newly discovered gold mines of California, 
were then attracting attention throughout 
the whole country, and with fathers he whs 
taken with the "gold fe\er". In tlie 
spring of 1850, he sold his stock and larni 
implements, and turned all his personal pro- 
perty into cash, and started for the New 
Eldorado. Going to New York, he was at- 
tracted by the handbills of Parker H. 
French, who proposed to conduct a train to 
California b\- way of Te.xas, in a very short 
specified time. Joining the rnmpany of Mr. 
French he started with him, but the e.\pe- 
dition \\'as subjected to repeated delays 
from the beginning. They landed at Ha- 
vana, where they remained one daw was 
three days at New Orleans, and one day at 
Galveston, rtnalK' reaching Port I^avaca. 
Here instead o( finding teams and spring 
wagons as promised, the party had to wait 
until three hundred wild mules were broken 
to drive, which consumed three weeks. 
They were then delayed at San Antonio 
three weeks, the Apiche Indians outside 
giving them no little concern. One dela)' 
after another occurring, and it being seen 
that their trip would hi indefinitely de- 
layed, the party took possession of the 
train, ousting French at the Rio Grand, and 
crossed over into Mexican territory, where 
our subject was robbed of fifty dollars. 
From this time on the sufferings of the 
party were most intense, sufferings through 
which it was almost impossible to come out 
alive. 

Securing a Mexican guide and forty days 
provisions, Mr. Stiles was one of a small 
party who attempted to cross the desert in- 



dependently of the others. Their guide got 
lost, and four days they were without water. 
They made their way back to El Paso, 
Texas, more dead than ali\e. They did not 
despair, however, but continued their jour- 
ney, traveling some fourteen hundred miles 
in old .Me.xirr), finall}' making theu' wav to 
.Mazatland. from whicli place they sailed to 
San F"rancisco, being ten months and se\en 
da}'s since leaving New York. He started 
with five hundred dollars and arrived with 
two dollars, one of which he spent for a loaf 
of bread. 

With his cousin Hiram. Mr. Stiles went 
tn church the (ollowint; Sunday night, and 
when the .service wa?. over he stood under 
a street light to see if he could not find 
some familiar face. He did not watch in 
vain, but soon found a friend who took him 
and his cousin to his home, and the next 
day found them work in a store, the pro- 
ceeds of which replenished their depleted 
finances. Rival companies were then run- 
ning boats to Sacramento, and they secured 
passage to the latter place for one dollar. 
From there they worked their passage to 
.Marys\'ille, fifty miles further up the river, 
where they secured work. From Mar3s- 
\ille they proceeded to Bidwell Bar, on 
the south fork of Feather river, and from 
there to Onion \'alle\-. After six months 
hard labor, he felt that he had enough of it, 
and returned home by way of the Isthmus 
of Panama, being seventeen days from San 
Francisco to Panama. From Aspinwall he 
took the steamer Illinois, on her first return 
trip to New York. Landing at Norfolk, he 
went from there to Philadelphia, where he 
deposited his gold dust at the mint, receiv- 
ing seven hundred and thirty-five dollars 
and thirty-four cents. 

After a season's recuperating, at his cjld 



U8 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



home, having had the Panama fever, Mr. 
Stiles made a prospecting tour through Uh- 
nois, spending one jear. Returning east, 
he later gave Iowa his attention, but failed 
to find a desirable location. He then bought 
a farm in New \'ork, but in 1855 soicJ out 
and came to Illinois lor permanent settle- 
ment. He first located in Kingston town- 
ship, De Kalb county, where he }et owns 
three hundred and twenty acres, one of the 
finest improved larms in the state, with a 
residence larger than most city residences, 
large barns and commodious outbuildings. 
He lived on the farm until the fall of 1884, 
when he removed to Genoa, built a large 
residence, one of the best in the village, 
and is now living retired. He has fruits of 
all kinds in profusion, with fine garden, 
flowers, etc. .^fter the death of his first 
wife, Mr. Stiles was married, December 14. 
1887, to Elizabeth E. Williams, daughter 
of Chet Williams, whose father was a major 
in the Revolutionar_\' war. The wife of 
Chet Williams was Miss Sally Harper, who 
died at the age of eighty \'ears. She was 
the daughter of Joseph and Esther (Dean) 
Harper, her father being a soldier in the 
war of iSiJ. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stiles are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, at Genoa, and 
they take a lively interest in its work. In 
politics he is a Republican, with strong pro- 
hibition leanings. He has held many minor 
township offices, and is regarded as one of 
De Kalb county's most estimable citizens. 



LORENZO DOW EVANS, residing on 
section 2, Sycamore township, has been 
a resident of De Kalb county for more than 
si.xty years. He was born in <\she county, 
North Carolma. February 9, 18.^4, and is 



the son of Benjamin Evans, also a native of 
.Ashe county. North Carolina, horn Febru- 
ary 21, 181 I, and who died in Sjcamore 
township, February 5, 1854, while \et in 
the prime of life. He was the son of Will- 
iam and .Ala ; Mitchell) Evans, the former a 
faithful soldier in the war of 1812. Benja- 
min Evans married Frances Perry, a daugh- 
ter of \\'illiam Perry, also a soldier of the 
war of 1812, who married a Miss Dean. 

The fall after the birth of our subject, 
his parents moved to Illinois, coming by 
wagon through Kentucky and Indiana, cross- 
ing the Ohio river at Louisville, Kentucky, 
and the Wabash river at X'incennes, Indi- 
ana. They remained the first winter at 
Hennepin, Putnam county, but decided to 
remove a little farther north, and in the 
spring of 18:55 located at Piano, Kendall 
county, where they remained three years. 
They then moved to Charter Grove, De 
Kalb count}-, and located on the farm now 
occupied by James Devine, where they re- 
mained three years, removing from thence 
to the Will King farm. At that time there 
were few dwellings to be seen, with the ex- 
ception of log houses. Our subject attend- 
ed school in an old log house, usualh' dur- 
ing a term of three months in winter, A 
part of the time he walked two and a half 
miles to the school-house, returning each 
evening. He afterward attended school six 
weeks in a frame school-house in Genoa 
township. 

Before Mr. Ex-ans attained his majority 
his father died, leaving him to manage the 
farm. He remained with his mother until 
of age, when part ot the farm of six hun- 
dred acres was set off to him for his own 
use. Since 1859 he has lived on his pres- 
ent farm, which comprises one hundred and 
ninety-five acres of prairie land and twenty- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



My 



two and a half acres of timber The farm 
lies partly in Genoa township. All the im- 
provements now to be seen upon the farm 
were placed by our subject, including the 
large house, barns and outbuildings, wind- 
mill and orchard. He has about two miles 
of tiling. 

Mr. Evans was married in Sycamore 
April 26, icS57, to Miss Mary Jewel, born in 
Ashtabula county, Ohio, March 5, 1.836, 
and who came west with her parents in 
1837. Her father, Eli G. Jewel, a black- 
smith by trade, was born in Vermont, but 
spent his boyhood and youth in Cattaraugus 
county, New York, going from thence to 
Ohio, when a young man. From Ohio he 
came to De Kalb county, Illinois, dris'ing 
through with teams, settling first in the 
country near Sycamore. At that time the 
Indians were still in the country and timid 
mothers were often frightened by their com- 
ing to the house for food and helping them- 
selves. Later he moved into Sycamore, 
where he set up a forge and for a time 
worked at his trade, but, giN'ing it up, he 
removed near Fort I^incoln, I\ansas, settling 
on a farm, where his death occurred in 
1862. at the age of about tifty-si.x years. 
His wife was Deborah Rock\\(iod, a nati\'e 
of Ohio and a daughter of Armah Rock- 
wood. They were the parents of five chil- 
dren, three of whom are living, and of these 
Mrs. Evans was second in order of birth. 
Eli G. jewel was the son of Joshua and 
Abigail ^Gilbert) Jewel, who moved from 
Vermont to Cattaraugus county, New York, 
where he died at the age of seventy-eight 
years. Eli G. Jewel made two trips to 
California, first in 1850, when he crossed 
the plains and returned by sea. His second 
trip was made in 1852, going and coming 
b)' water. 



To our subject and wife nine children 
have been born, of whom four died in 
infancy. Those growing to maturity are 
Frances, Ma)', Elmer, Leroy and Nellie. 
Elmer married Osia Sellers, living in Genoa, 
and they had two children, Merrill Leroy 
and Ray Adrian. lilmerdied July 8, 1898. 
Lero)- is a telegraph operator at Apple 
River. Illinois. In politics Mr. E\'ans is a 
Republican. That he is a friend of the 
public schools is shown from the fact that 
he has been a school director, more or less, 
since attaining his majority. The many 
wonderful changes that have been made in 
De Ralb county since he became a citizen 
can scarceh' be realized, even by those who 
have been most acti\'e in its transformation. 
Among the pioneers who deser\-e credit for 
what has been done L. l)o\s' E\ans stands 
amons' the first. 



N.ATHANIEL S. RELLOGG. of Frank- 
lin township, who is actively engaged 
in agricultural pursuits on section 17, was 
born in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, July 2y, 
I 829. He is a son of John and Sarah (Hub- 
bard) Rellogg, both natives of Massachusetts. 
Of their two children, Nathaniel is our sub- 
ject, and John J. is deceased. The paternal 
great-grandfather Rellogg was a native of 
Scotland, who emigrated to this countr\- 
prior -to the I\e\-olutionary war. His son, 
Nathaniel Kellogg, Sr, , the grandfather of 
our subject, was a native of Connecticut, a 
farmer by occupation, and was in the Revo- 
lutionary war. John Rellogg, the father, 
was for some years adjutant-general of the 
state milita, of Massachusetts, and was act- 
ively engaged in the Civil \\ar. In 1838, 
he came west with his fannlv, and located 
near Pekin. Tazewell countv. Illinois. He 



ilOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



later returned to Massachusetts, but bein^ 
dissatisfied came again to Illinois and set- 
tled ni Ti\zt^\\e\\ county, wheiehe remained 
about two \ears. He then renio\ed to Mc- 
Lean county, Illinois, and ran a general 
store for about twenty-five years. He was 
quite a prominent man in McLean count}', 
and was justice of the peace for thirty-three 
years, being the oldest justice of the peace 
m the state. He died at the age of eighty- 
six years. 

Nathaniel S. Kellogg was reared and 
educated in Massachusetts. After receiving 
his primary education, he entered the col- 
lege at Leno.x, Massachusetts, and pursued 
a three years course. He then taught one 
term in Massachusetts, after which he came 
to Illinois, in 1845, and hjcated in Dele\an 
township, Tazewell county, Illinois, where 
he purchased a iarm of one hundred and 
sixty acres. In 1855, he bought six hun- 
dred and forty acres in McLean county, in 
section 22, town 22, a tract of government 
land, for which he paid about fifteen dollars 
per acre. That land lie sold in the fall of 
1864. 

On the 7th of Xo\eii)b',r, 1847, Mr. 
Kellogg was united in marriage with .Miss 
.\lma L. Baird, a native of Becket, Massa- 
chusetts, and a daughter of Kendall and 
Lucinda (Chaffee i Baird, both of whom 
were also nati\es of Becket, Massachusetts, 
and the parents of six children. Prentice C. , 
.\ba, .\lma I,., Fred K., Kate and George 
K, To our subject and wife three children 
were born, John K., Kate L. and Pren- 
tice F. 

Since his marriage Mr. Kellogg has been 
engaged in various lines of business. For a 
time he was in the butcher business and a 
dealer in stock in Rockford. He then 
traveled for a St. Joseph. Missouri, woolen 



goods manufactory, for two years, through 
Dakota, Nebraska and Iowa, and for a 
clothing firm in Rockford, fi\e \ears, and 
for a Beloit, Wisconsin, clothing firm, two 
\'ears. .Among various political offices that 
he has held are those of school director and 
road commissioner. In politics he is a Re- 
publican, a strong belie\er in the principles 
of the party. It is, however, as an agri- 
culturalist that he is best known, his farm 
being always kept in good condition and 
under a high state of cu!ti\'ati(m. 



BRIGHAM P. BEMIS, deceased, was 
one of De Kalb township's most worthy 
citizens, who in life resided on his farm in 
section 33. He was a native of N!assachu- 
setts. born May 25, 1829. and was the son 
of Benjamin Bemis, whu followed farming 
during his entire life and who never came 
west. His death and that of his wife oc- 
curred in the east. The bojhood and youth 
of our subject were spent in his native state, 
and his education was received in the public 
schools. He was an early settler of Kane 
county, Illinois, locating at Sugar Grove, 
Kane county, where he li\ed some years, 
engaging in farming. In 1856, he came to 
De Kalb county, Illinois, and purchased a 
farm of fifty acres in section 33, De Kalb 
township, upon which his widow now lives. 
On the 27th of March, 1855, Mr. Bemis 
was united in marrias;e with Miss Elizabeth 
Duffy, a native of Ohio, born in 1830, and 
a daughter of James and Lj'dia Duffy. Her 
mother died when she was but three years 
old, and her father marrying again, removed 
to Illinois, in 1841, where his death oc- 
curred in 1 87 3. He was married three 
times, and had sixteen children, Mrs. Bemis 
being third m order of birth by the first 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



351 



wife. She was but eleven years of age 
when she came to De I\alb county, and 
here her entire life has since been spent. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Bemis five children were 
born, four of whom are now living: Frank 
W., Frederick J., William \V. and Burt 
P. Two of these sons are prosperous busi- 
ness men in De Kalb. 

For some years prior to his death Mr. 
Bemis was in ill health. In 1882 he took a 
trip to Florida, to regain his lost vigor, but 
his trip was without avail, death coming to 
his relief, on April 5, of the same year, in 
Jacksonville, Florida. Fraternally he was 
a Mason in good standing and lived up to 
the principles taught by that ancient and 
worthy order. Politically he was a Repub- 
lican. A loving husband, an indulgent 
father, and a worthy citizen, who treated 
his neighbors kindly, his death was sincerely 
mourned by all. 



IRA EVANS, who resides on section 2, 
Sycamore township, was born in Charter 
Grove within a few rods of his present res- 
idence on the old homestead, where his par- 
ents, Benjamin and Frances (Perry) Evans, 
settled in the fall of 183S. his birth occur- 
ring January 18, 1841. His parents were 
natives of Ashe county. North Carolina. 
While they considered the Old North state 
in many respects a desirable place to live, 
they yet believed that the opportunities for 
advancement and for the further improve- 
men of their children would be much greater 
in the Prairie state, and they therefore deter- 
mined to make this their home. Leaving 
their native state with what has been termed 
a prairie schooner, they passed through the 
states of Kentucky and Indiana, and in the 
fall of 1834 made a stop at Hennepin, Put- 



nam county, Illinois, where they remained 
a few months, going from thence to Piano, 
Kendall county, finally locating in Sycamore 
township, where they made a permanent 
settlement. Selecting a tract of land in 
section 3, they commenced its improve- 
ment, and at the death of the father, which 
occurred early in the '50s, he was the owner 
of si.\ hundred acres of fine land, the great 
part of which was under cultivation. 

Our subject was but a boy when his fa- 
ther died, and he remained with his mother 
until after he reached his majority, assisting 
in the cultivation of the home farm. His 
education was obtained principally in the 
old log school-house, with its primitive fur- 
niture and massive fire place. He was mar- 
ried July 20, 1862, to Miss Nancy Divine, 
eldest daughter of Eleazer and Sallie A. 
(Sherbey) Divine, an extended account of 
whom appears elsewhere in this work. She 
was born in Sullivan county. New York, in 
the town of Grahamville, but came with her 
parents to De Kalb county when a child, 
and here grew to womanhood. By this 
union two children were born, Milton D. 
and Luella. 

Immediatel}- after marriage Mr. Evans 
began farming on one hundred and sixty- 
two acres, section 2, Sycamore township, 
his portion of his father's estate. He there 
still continues to reside, and there his chil- 
dren were born. Many improvements have 
been made upon the place since it came into 
his possession, including the present fine 
modern frame house of tasteful architecture. 
In politics he is an earnest Republican, and 
has served as road commissioner three 
years and for many years was school direct- 
or. A life long resident of De Kalb county, 
he has gone in and out among the people 
doing the work at hand cheerfully and well, 



"HI-: BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and IS line ol the few lixiiif^ pioneers who 
ha\e w ituesseci the chHiif,'e in the country 
from H \ast wilderness to the most product- 
ive section of the union. 



PHILLIP I'. PLAPP, a farmer residing; 
on section jS, >[aita township. De 
Kalli county. Ilhnois, was iiorn in Pierce 
townsliip, thisconnt\, Marcii \j, KS55, and 
IS the son of Jacob F. and Elizabeth B. 
Plapp, lioth of whom were natives of Ger- 
many. Jacob Plapp came to this country 
when he was about eighteen years of age. 
while his wife accompanied her parents to 
this country in 1830, when she was but 
ele\en years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Plapp 
first located in Ohio, and later came to De 
Kalb county, Illinois, settling in Pierce 
township, where he died in 1885. His wife 
survives him at the age of eighty-three 
years. In their family were eleven children, 
nine of whom are yet living. 

Phillip F. Plapp grew to manhood in his 
native township and was educated in its 
public schools. When he reached his ma- 
jority he began to work out on farms, and 
built for himself a reputation for honesty 
and industry, two principles which he has 
observed all through life, and which must be 
the warp and woof of every successful en- 
terprise. On November 4. 1S80, he was 
united in marriage with Miss Lucy A. Del- 
bridge, born in De Kalb, May 14, 1S60, and 
a daughter of Thomas and Ellen (CoUmorei 
Delbridge. By this union hvc children 
have been born: Althia M., October S, 
tSSi, Alfred E., January 17, 1885. and who 
died in April of the same year; Winifred V., 
February 14, 1886; Mabel E. , September 
19, 1888. and Clarence T. , December 21, 
I 890. 



On January 1, 1883, Mr. Plapp bought 
a farm of one hundred and si.xty acres in 
Ogle countw where he resided for fourteen 
years. During his residence there he suc- 
ceeded by the practice of hard labor and 
economy, in accumulating a nice sum, be- 
sides improving his farm, enabling him to 
dispose of the same at a considerable ad- 
vance on the purchase |>rice, thus giving him 
the means of purchasing a larger and better 
farm in Malta township, De Kalb county, 
which he did in 1897. His Malta farm 
consists of two hundred and forty acres, is 
well situated and well improved, and with 
Mr. Plapp's methods of working, will be a 
golden spot in beauty and productiveness. 
Politically Mr. Plapp is a Republican, and 
his popularity has been such that he has 
been called upon to till various township of- 
fices, which he has done to the satisfaction 
of all concerned. Mrs. Plapp has been a 
consistent member of the Congregational 
church for the past twenty years. 



EDGAR M. PHELPS, contracting painter 
of Sycamore, was born in Genoa town- 
ship. De Kalb county, Illinois, November 
25, 1841. His father, William Phelps, was 
a well-known builder and contractor in the 
early history of De Kalb county. He first 
settled in Genoa township on a farm, and 
in 1844 moved to the village of Genoa, 
where he remained until 1848, and then 
moved to Sycamore, having secured the 
contract for the erection of a new court- 
house. He married Elizabeth Hollembeak, 
a daughter of Ruloff W. and Electa (Ames) 
Hollembeak, the former a native of Shore- 
ham, \'ermont, and a son of Abraham 
and Lovina (Lord) Hollembeak. who were 
also natives of X'ermont. The father of 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



353 



Abraham Hollembeak was a native of 
Holland and was one of three brothers to 
found the family in this country. Electa 
Ames was a daughter of Barnabas .Ames, 
who was also a native of \'ermont. The 
paternal grandfather, William Phelps, Sr. , 
married Cynthia Marston. He was a sol- 
dier in the Revolutionary war, and died 
when forty-eight years of age. 

After the completion of the courthouse, 
William Phelps, the father, purchased a 
steam sawmill, which had been in operation 
in St. Charles, Kane county, and moved 
the same to Sycamore and commenced the 
milling business. While running the mill 
he received injuries which so seriously 
crippled him that he was unable to continue 
the business. He later sold the mill, and 
was elected constable and collector, a do-all 
office at that time, and served one term. 
He was later elected sheriff of the county, 
and served satisfactorily for two years. He 
was of an inventive turn of mind, and in- 
vented and patented a churn that he manu- 
factured and which became quite popular. 
Models of several of his inventions are now 
in the patent office at Washington. 

The subject of this sketch was but seven 
years of age when he accompanied his par- 
ents to Sycamore, and he has since resided 
at the county seat. He attended the public 
schools in Sycamore until the age of four- 
teen years, for a time being a student in the 
old school-house that stood at the corner 
of Main and Sycamore streets. After school 
days, he found work on farms in the town- 
ships surrounding Sycamore, until after the 
Civil war commenced. He enlisted in Au- 
gust, 1862, at Sycamore, and was mustered 
into the service September 2, at Dixon, 
Illinois, as a member of Company A. One 
Hundred and Fifth Illinois Volunteer In- 



fantry. With his regiment he was in the 
battles of Resaca and New Hope Church, 
was then in the Atlanta campaign and in 
the battles at Savannah, Columbia, Averys- 
boro, and Bentonville, North Carolina. He 
was with his regiment at Raleigh, North 
Carolina, when Lee surrendered. After the 
close of the campaign, those who were not 
able to stand the march from the battle- 
fields through Richmond and Virginia, to 
Washington, were sent around by boat. Mr. 
Phelps having a large carbuncle on his back 
was among the number sent by water to the 
Capital, where he participated in the Grand 
Review. He was mustered out at Chicago, 
June 10, 1865. 

On receiving his discharge Mr. Phelps 
returned to his home in Sycamore and 
learned the painter's trade with a brother, 
and was with him for some four or five 
years, when he began contracting for him- 
self and has continued in the business to the 
present time. His work is principally con- 
fined to the northern part of De Kalb 
count}- and he employs from three to twelve 
men. He has painted many of the most 
prominent public and private buildings in 
the vicinity of Sycamore. 

Mr. Phelps was married November 23, 
1867, in Linnville township, Ogle county, 
Illinois, to Miss Martha Jinks, born in Cov- 
entry, England, June 14, 1S47. Her father, 
William Jinks, was born at Ruy;by, Eng- 
land, where his wife, Ann Kidsley, was also 
born and where they were married. They 
came to America in 1852, sailing from Liv- 
erpool to New York. 'He came directly 
west to Ogle county. Illinois, and located 
in Lmnville township, where a brother then 
resided. After living in Linnville township 
some six months he moved to Kingston, 
where he engaged in the blacksmith trade 



554 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



for five years. During this time he studied 
veterinary surgery, and when he left Kings- 
ton he mo\ed to his farm of eighty acres in 
Linnville township and practiced until he 
retired. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Phelps four children 
have been born. Ada is the wife of George 
P. Blanchard, of Sycamore, and they have 
three children, [ames Edgar, Merle and 
Barbara. Ella, Lizzie and Edgar William 
yet remain at home. In politics Mr. Phelps 
is a Republican, his first presidential vote 
being cast for Abraham I^incoln. He has 
never been an office seeker, but served two 
terms as township collector. f^e is a mem- 
ber of the (irand Army of the Republic and 
was fornierlv a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. .Mrs. Phelps is a 
member of the I'nuersalist church. 



JAMES H. MOORE, who resides on sec- 
tion 35, Genoa township, was born De- 
cember 29, 1835, ^ind is well known as the 
first white child born in the township. He 
is the son of Voranus lunory and Sylvia 
(Madison) Moore, the former a native of 
Palmer, Massachusetts, and the latter of 
Trumbull county, Ohio, and a daughter of 
Thomas Madison, a farmer by occupation, 
born in Ohio, who came west m 1835, with 
the father of our subject, and took up a 
claim where the village of Genoa now stands, 
built a log tavern, the first in the township, 
and kept the same for many years. He 
was the first justice of the peace in the 
township. Later he sold his property in 
Genoa, and went to Texas, where his death 
occurred. Voranus E. Moore came to De 
Kalb couiit\- in the fall of 1835, and was 
the first to commence housekeeping in 



Genoa township. He located a claim south 
of the present village of Genoa, where the 
Illinois Central depot now stands. He took 
up a claim of crine hundred and three acres, 
and first built his cabin near the river, and 
later erected a frame residence on the site 
of the Illmois Central depot. When the 
land came into market, he purchased the 
claim and there resided until 1863, when 
he sold out and mcjved to McLean county, 
locating near Bloomington, where his death 
occurred in 1880. The paternal grand- 
father. Gideon Moore, was also a native of 
Palmer, Massachusetts. By occupation he 
was a farmer and gardener in his native 
state. Later in life he came to Ilhnois, 
where his death occurred at the age of nine- 
ty-si.\ years, four months and ten da\s. He 
had a brother who lived to be one hundred 
and four years old. 

The subject of this sketch was reared in 
his native township, received his education 
in the old log school-house, attending school 
during three months in the winter. The 
first school-house was erected near the pres- 
ent farm of our subject. Pupils attended 
the school from Mayfield. Sycamore. Kings- 
ton and Genoa townships, some of the 
pupils walking three or four miles to 
the school and returning each day. Mr. 
Moore attended the school from the time 
he was six years of age until he was 
twenty years old. He worked cju neigh- 
boring farms every season, rakmg in the 
harvest fields when cradles were used. 
He was one of a family of six children, four 
of whom are yet living. Clarissa married 
Lysander Tupper and lives in Oregon. John 
H. is the subject of this sketch. Henry and 
Jonathan F. live at Charter Grove. 

When he attained his majority, Mr. 
Moore went to Kansas and took up a claim, 




JAMES H. MOORE. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



35/ 



and later returned and on the 3rd of Febru- 
ary, 1858, at Sycamore, was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Adeiaine Miller, a native of 
Newton Falls. Ohio, who came west in 
1845 with her parents. After his marriage 
he rented his father's farm, and continued 
renting other farms until the fall of 1S67, 
when he purchased one hundred and twenty 
acres where he now resides, together with 
five acres of timber in Charter Grove. In 
1887 his wife died, leaving four children. 
Adelbert is the present city marshal of 
Hampshire, Illinois. Lillie married Henry 
Bartlett, and they reside near Charles City, 
Iowa. Alfred is a carpenter residing in 
Genoa. W^illiam is a farmer of Genoa town- 
ship. 

The second marriage of Mr. Moore was 
in 1888, when he wedded Mrs. Mary Cra- 
mer, widow of Nathan Cramer, and a 
daughter of Clark Henderson, a native of 
Vermont and a farmer by occupation, who 
died at the age of fifty-five years, in Barr) 
county, Michigan. He was the son of Tru- 
man Henderson. His wife was Mary Dake, 
also a native of Vermont and a daughter of 
Benjamin and Polly Dake. Clark and Mary 
Henderson were the parents of ten children, 
four of whom are now living. By her first 
marriage Mrs. Moore had one son. William 
Henry Cramer. By her union with Mr. 
Moore, she became the mother of two sons, 
James Henry and Voranus Emory. 

In politics Mr. Moore is a Republican, 
and cast his first presidential vote for John 
C. Fremont. He has satisfactorily filled 
several of the minor township offices. Re- 
ligiously he is a member of the Advent 
Christian church. In addition to his gen- 
eral farming he is engaged in dairying, hav- 
ing twenty-five head of milch cows. For 
eight years he shipped to Chicago and for 



two years has been selling to the creamery 
at Charter Gro\e. He is a good and hon- 
orable man, and his friends are man\ . 



ORRIN MERRITT, senior member of 
the firm of Merritt cS; Hadsall, con- 
tractors and builders, Genoa, was born in 
Concord township, Cuyahoga county, Ohio, 
September 27, 1831. His father. Calvin 
Merritt, was born in Worcester, Massachu- 
setts, and moved to Ohio in an early day 
while that state was yet on the frontier In 
1S44 he came to Illinois and purchased a 
farm at Shattuck's Gro\e, Boone county, to 
which he added three hundred and twenty 
acres of fine land. On that farm he lived 
until after the death of his wife, and about 
1S70 sold it, and made his home with his 
children during the remainderof his life, dy- 
ing when upwards of eighty years of age. 
In politics he was a life-long Democrat, and 
was honored with .several minor township 
offices. He married Eliza Shattuck, horn 
about SIX miles from Oswego, New York, in 
1805, and a daughter of Caleb and Amelia 
Shattuck. also natives of New York. She 
died in 185 1. They were the parents of 
eight children, as follows: Mrs. Louisa 
Herrick, Mrs. Delilah Hinman, Orrin, Mrs. 
Esther Ingraham, Mrs. Selinda Harris, Gir- 
den, Mrs. Rosetta Conover, and Mrs. Jose- 
phine Landreth. The paternal grandfather, 
Moses Merritt. moved from Massachusetts 
to Ohio, where he died at the age of sixt>- 
five years. His occupation was that of a 
farmer during his entire life. 

The subject of this sketch attended the 
district schools in his native state until the 
age of twelve years, and then spent one year 
in a private school at Cleveland. Ohio. He 
accompanied the family from Ohio to Shat- 



:;;,S 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL KiXORD. 



tuck's Grove, near Belvidere, Boone county. 
Illinois, where they arrived in July. 1844. 
They came by lakes froin Cle\eland to Chi- 
cago, and by teams to Shattuck's Grove, 
and were thiee weeks ni route. Arriving: 
here (jur subject entered school in Belvidere. 
which he attended until fifteen years old. 
He bej^an life for himself at the age of si.N- 
teei] 3'ears, working during the winter months 
in the pineries in the south and spending his 
summers at h(jme. He would go to the 
pineries in the fall, where he would spend 
seven months chopping wood for steamboats. 
In the fall of 1S49 he went to Cleveland. 
Ohio, where he spent eight years learning 
the trade of ship carpenter, at which he 
worked a portion of the time as journe\'man. 
Returning to Illinois, he bought a farm near 
.Shattuck's Grove, which he cultivated for 
si.\ years. He then went to Chicago, and 
for four \ears was engaged in ship building, 
and three years in the car shops of the Illi- 
nois Central Railroad. In 1877, he came 
to Genoa, and for eleven years (ollowed 
contracting and building alone. Since |8<SS 
he has been in partnership with John Had- 
sall, and they are now the most substantial 
builders in Genoa. 

Mr. Merritt was married Februarv 7, 
1850, near Shattuck's (.iro\;e. to Miss Mary 
\\'ilson, a native of Upper Canada, born in 
October, 1834, and a daughter of Thomas 
Wilson, born in Lower Canada, and who 
served in the war of 181:!. He came to Illi- 
nois in 1844, locating near Shattuck's 
Grove, where he spent the remainder of his 
life, dying when past eighty-one years. 
One of his sons served in the war for the 
Union , His father was Christopher Wilson. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Merritt four children have 
been born — .Albert. .Andrew, Hattie and 
Henrv. The first named is now deceased. 



Henry has been twice married, his first union 
being with Miss Cora Atwood, by whom he 
has three children, Albert, Jennie and Mary. 
His second union was with Miss Nettie 
Thompson and they have two children, 
Orrin and Harry. 

In politics Mr. Merritt is an independent 
Democrat, in national elections usually vot- 
ing his party ticket, and in local elections 
for the best man. I-'raternally he is a mem- 
ber of Genoa Lodge, No. 768, I. O. O. F., 
and of Ellwood Encampment at Sycamore. 
He has never been an office seeker nor an 
office holder, serving only as a member of 
the village board. Enterprising and pro- 
gressi\e, he endeavors to do what will best 
advance the interest of his adopted town 
and count}'. 



PETEK RAMER, a retired farmer resid- 
ing m the village of Hinkley, has been 
a resident of Illinois since 1846, and for 
many years was one of the most successful 
farmers in De Kalb county. He was born in 
Perry countv. Pennsyh'ania, August 4, 1830, 
and is the son of Henry Rarner, a native of 
the same county and state, born August. 8, 
1804. The paternal grandfather was like- 
wise a native of Pennsylvania, while the 
family are of German descent. Henry Ra- 
rner grew to manhood in his native county, 
and there married Susanna Troup, a native 
of Perr\ county, Pennsylvania, born No- 
vember J. 1808. The early life of Henry 
Ramer was spent on a farm, and he choose 
the occupation of farming for a life work. 
In 1832 he moved to Richland county, Ohio, 
where he purchased a farm of one hundred 
and twenty acres, and there continued until 
1846, when he came to Illinois, first locat- 
ing in Du Page county, where he remained 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECGRI 



3 59 



three years, and then came to De Kalb 
county, settling in Pierce township. He 
there purchased a tract of one hundred and 
sixty acres and at once commenced the de- 
velopment of the place. Not a house was 
in sight in any direction, although it was not 
many years before neighbors began to settle 
around them. He later purchased one hun- 
dred and sixty acres additional, making him 
a fine farm of three hundred and twent\- 
acres. The improvements that he made 
were all first class, and on that farm he 
spent the last years of his life, dying April 
30, 1 88 1, at the age of seventy-six years. 
His wife died January 9, 1S77. 

Peter Ramer, our subject, was the old- 
est son of a family of seven sons and three 
daughters born to his parents, all of whom 
grew to mature years. He assisted his 
father in clearing and opening up the Ohio 
farm, and also in breaking the land and de- 
veloping the farm in De Kalb county. He 
remained with his parents as a dutiful son 
until after attaining his majority. He earned 
his first dollar after the age of twenty-one 
years by mowing for a neighbor. He was 
married in De Kalb county, July 30, 1853, 
to Elizabeth Garlach, a native of Germany, 
who came when a child with her parents to 
the United States, her father becoming one 
of the early settlers of De Kalb county. 
After his marriage he rented for one year, 
and then bought eighty acres of raw prairie 
land in Pierce township, built a small house 
and strawbarn and began farming in earnest. 
He later bought eighty acres adjoining, gi\-- 
ing him a farm of one hundred and sixt\- 
acres, on which he resided for many years. 
In due time the small dwelling house gave 
place to a more pretentious one. the straw 
barn to a large frame one, with plenty of 
shed room for stock. He also purchased 



one hundred and sixty acres additional, 
making his farm comprise three hundre<I 
and twenty acres. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Ramer seven children 
were born, as follows; Wilhelmina, wife of 
Adolphus Harter, of Aurora, Illinois; Elihu 
B., a farmer, of Squaw Grove township; 
Frankie, wife of Elias Myers, a farmer of 
Pierce township, residing on the old home- 
stead; Grant, a farmer, of Paw Paw town- 
ship; Ella, who is now housekeeper for her 
father, and two who died in childhood. The 
mother of these children died July 26, 1892, 
leaving many friends to mourn her loss. 

Mr. Ramer has been a life-long Repub- 
lican, casting his first presidential \'ote for 
John C. Fremont m 1856, followed b}' 
Abraham Lincoln in i860 and every presi- 
dential nominee of the party to the present 
time. He has been honored by his fello\v 
citizens with several offices of honor and 
trust and in ever\' position has discharged 
the duties in a most satisfactory manner. 
In 1890 he rented his farm, purchased prop- 
erty in Hinckley and removed to that vil- 
lage, where he has since lived retired. He 
is one of the official members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, with which he has 
been connected for forty years. For forty- 
nine years he -has been a resident of Illinois 
and in the great changes that have been 
made he has done his part. 



JOHN HELSON, a retired farmer resid- 
ing in the city of Sycamore, was born 
in the town of Plymouth, Devonshire, Eng- 
land, November 24, 1819. His father. 
John Helson Sr. , was born in the parish of 
Braidwood, Widger, Devonshire, England, 
about 1790, and died at the age of sevent\- 
four years. In his young manhood he was 



^,6o 



HI-: i;iU(.RAFHICAI, RECORD. 



a workman in the limestone quarries, and 
about 1823 was nearly killed by a prema- 
ture blast, a piece being cut out of his face. 
After that he engaged in general work as a 
coninion laborer. His wife. Mary Harris, 
a daughter of Joseph Harris, was born near 
Plymouth, Devonshire, England, and died 
\vhen about forty-five }ears old. 

In his boyhood and youth our subject 
worked on a farm in Devonshire, but from 
the age of twenty-one 3'ears. for a period of 
nine years, he worked in the mines in Corn- 
wall. Leaving that employment he came 
to the United States, sailing from Plymouth 
in the vessel Cordelia, a three masted ship, 
leaving April 4. 1848, and landing in <Hie- 
bec. Canada, after a x'oyage of si.\ weeks 
and three days. I'rom (.Uiebec he went to 
Erie. Pennsylvania, by lake, and from there 
to New Caslle, by the old Pittsburg & Erie 
canal, where he remained from June, 1848, 
until the spring of 1851. Leaving New Cas- 
tle he came to Illinois and purchased a farm 
of one hundred and fifty acres. l\'ing partly 
in Kane and I)e Kalb counties. He later 
added to his orij^inal purchase until he had 
two hundred and seventy-five acres of well 
improved iaiid. In the spring of 1851 he 
moved his family to .Sycamore township, 
and. lea\ing them, went to th-e Lake Supe- 
rior copper mines and remained there until 
the fall of 1852. when he returned to his 
family and remained with them until the 
spring of 1853. when he again returned to 
the mines and remained there until the fall 
of 1854. Returning home he then engaged 
m farming until the fall of 1870, when he 
came to Sycamore, and has since been liv- 
ing retired. 

Mr. Helson was married in St. Clear 
parish. De\'onshire. England, to Miss Eliza- 
beth Jane, daughter ol William anil ( ath- 



erine (Johns) Jane. By this union seven 
children have been born: George John, 
residing on a farm in Sycamore township; 
May Jane, wife of W. W. London; Eliza- 
beth, wife of William Shuey, of Sycamore 
township; Richard [ohn. residing in Iowa; 
Louisa, wife of William Seamans, of Syca- 
more; Catherine, wife of Nicholas Johnson, 
of Sycamore; and Thomas, of the firm of 
Briggs, Helson & Olson. Mrs. Helson died 
June 22, 1896. She was a member of the 
M. E. church. 

William W. London, the son-in-law of 
Mr. Helson, of whom mention has been 
made, was born in Grampian Hills town- 
ship, Fairfield county, Pennsylvania, Janu- 
ar}- I, 1841, and is the son of Richard W. 
and Sarah Ann (Estes) London, both of 
whom were natives of Luzerne county, 
Pennsylvania. He came west with his par- 
ents in 1855, arriving in De Kalb county 
March 6. of that year. His father pur- 
chased a farm of eighty acres in Mayfield 
township, which he later sold, and pur- 
chased one on the west line of the city of 
Sycamore, where he lived seven years, then 
sold and bought eighty-six acres in Cort- 
land township, NN'hich he later rented, and 
moving to Sycamore resided there until his 
death. February i, 18S0. William W. re- 
mained at home until he attained his ma- 
joritv when he rented a farm for three years, 
then married, and rented other farms for 
four 3'ears. and later purchased land and 
continued farming until the spring of 1895, 
when he removed to Sycamore and is now 
living retired. His present farm in May- 
field township consists of one hundred and 
eighty acres. 

In 1870 Mr. Helson purchased residence 
property <'ii Cms? street. Sycamore, to 
which he remmed, but has since gneii to 



THE BIOGRAPHICAT, KKCORD. 



%6t 



his daughter. Mrs. London, with whom lit- 
makes his home. For many years he was 
a me.Tiber of the United Brethern church, 
but is now a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and in politics is a Re- 
publican, although with stron:; prohibition 
tendencies. He has held the ofHce of road 
commissioner and school director the greater 
part of the time since residing in the count)'. 
He was offered the supervisorship and other 
offices, but refused to accept. 



AAROX MOWERS, of Franklin town- 
ship, is a self-made man. one of the 
best farmers in De Kalb county, and now 
owns and operates a farm of six hundred 
and forty acres. He is a native of Herki- 
mer county, New York, born May lo, i!^23, 
and is the son of John G, and Catherine 
(Buell) Mowers, both natives of New York 
state, who were the parents of six children 
— Giddie, Eliza, Sina and Maria (twins), 
Levi and Aaron. Of these our subject is 
the only survivor. The paternal grandfa- 
ther, George Mowers, was also a native of 
New York state, and a soldier in the Revo- 
lutionary war, for services in which, during 
the last \ears of his life, he drew a pension. 
By occupation he was a farmer. His death 
occurred at a very advanced age. 

Aaron Mowers was reared on the home 
farm in his native state and educated in its 
public schools. In March, 1S51, he mar- 
ried Margaret Rickard, a native of Herki- 
mer county. New York, and a daughter of 
Jacob and Mary (Oakj Rickard, both na- 
tives of the same state. They were the 
parents of nine children, four of whom are 
deceased, Nancy, Peter, John and Phebe. 
The living are Margaret, David, Louisa, 
.•Mva and Eliza. The paternal grandfather 



of .Mrs. .Mowers was Peter Rickard, who 
was likewise a native of Herkimer county. 
New York, a farmer by occupation and who 
lived to an advanced age. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Mowers se\-en children have been born — 
Fayette. Harvey. James. Mar\'. Charlie, 
Allan and Lizzie, the last named f)eing de- 
ceased. 

About one year after their marriage Mr. 
and Mrs. Mowers came to De Kalb count}' 
and located in South Gro\'e township, on 
section 17, where he purchased one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of go\'ernment land at 
one dollar and twenty-five cents per acre. 
He at once commenced the improvement of 
the same, and, as his means increased, 
added to the area of his land, until he has 
now six hundred and forty acres, worth on 
an average seventy-h\e dollars per acre. 
In all hi.-^, farming operations he has met 
with success, and is now numbered among 
the most substantial farmers of the count}'. 
In politics he is an enthusiastic Republican 
and has served as road commissioner three 
years. His residence in Fairdale is a neat 
and attractive one, and he can well afford 
to live in ease and retirement, enjoying the 
fruits of vears of honest toil. 



CARL BURTON CRAWFORD, one of 
the leading business men of Genoa and 
a dealer in groceries, was born in Genoa 
township, March 27. 1865. His father, 
Alexander Crawford, was born in Mercer 
county, Pennsylvania, December 22. 1S22, 
and in the spring of 1828 accompanied his 
parents to Richmond county, Ohio, and 
there resided until 1839. On the first of 
November of that year the family left Ohio 
and reached Genoa, Illinois, the 24th of the 
same month, driving through by wagon. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



His father settled first in Sycamore town- 
ship, where he bought a claim, but later 
sold it and went to Iowa, where he died in 
1867. Alexander Crawford, Jr.. remained 
in Illinois when his parents moved west. 
He here married, December 25, 1845, Miss 
Laura Shurtleff, a native of Canada and a 
dauEjhter of David and Ruth (^Knappj Shurt- 
leff, her father being a son of Ichabod Shurt- 
leff. They became the parents of five chil- 
dren; Mrs Theresa Smith, Henry, Howard, 
Eveihard and Carl. The paternal grand- 
father. Ale.Kander Crawford, Sr. , married 
Rachel Kidd, a daughter of William Kidd and 
a native of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. She died 
in Sycamore township. The paternal great- 
grandfather. David Crawford, who married 
a Miss Wickhain, was a native of Pennsyl- 
\ania and there spent his entire life. 

The subject of this sketch attended the 
(lenoa schools until the age of seventeen 
years, and for si.\ or se\ en years clerked in 
his father's store. In 1894 the father re- 
tired from business and was succeeded by 
his sons, one ol whom took charge of the 
drj- goods and our subject the grocery de- 
partment. He now carries a complete line 
of staple and fancy groceries and has an ex- 
cellent trade. He was married in Genoa in 
18S0 to Miss Luella Baldwin, a native of 
Genoa and a daughter of William Clark 
Baldwin. They ha\-e become the parents 
ol five children: \'ernon, \'ellma, Frank, 
.\rla and lone, the last named being 
deceased. 

In politics Mr. Crawford is a Republic- 
an and has served as a member of the 
\illage board one term and township col- 
lector one term. Fraternally he is a Mason 
and a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica and Rniiihts of the Globe. 



REV. W. S. GRANGE, pastor of the 
Congregational church of Malta, Illi- 
nois, was born in Eldredsville, Sullivan 
county, Pennsyhania, April 7, 1S57, and is 
the son of John W. and b^li^a (\'ough) 
Grange, both nati\es of Pennsyhania. The 
father was a farmer of respectability and 
prominence in his county and died in August, 
1S97. He was of English e.xtraction, while 
his wife was of Scotch descent. She sur- 
vives him and resides on the farm in Sulli- 
\au county, Pennsylvania. Their family 
consisted of eleven children, nine of whom 
are yet living. One of their sons is an at- 
torney at Wheaton, Illinois. Each of the 
sons and two ot the daughters have been 
teachers in the public schools, a fact that 
speaks well for their parents and well as for 
their own ambition in that line. 

The subject of this sketch is third in 
order of birth, and was reared and received 
his primary education in the common 
schools of his native township. Subse- 
quenth- he attended Groveland Seminary, 
in Dodge count}', Minnesota, and afterward 
took a special course at Wheaton College, 
Wheaton, Illinois. On leaving college, he 
entered the Chicago Theological Seminar)', 
from which he was graduated in 1892. Four 
years previous to this, however, he was 
ordained to the ministry at Dayton, Iowa. 

Shortly after being graduated from the 
Theological Seminary in 1892. Mr. Grange 
assumed his first pastorate, taking charge of 
the Congregational church at .Atkinson, 
Illinois. During his pastorate of this church 
he succeeded in purchasing from the Pres- 
byterians a building in the country which 
formed a mission field for his church. He 
improved the property of his own church by 
adding a lecture rooni and pastor's study. 
During this pleasant pastorate, his cungre- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



363 



gation almost doubled, and his membership 
increased very nearly in the same propor- 
tion. 

It was during his residence in Atkinson 
that Mr. C range saw the necessit\' of having 
Hies for sermons and clip|jings. He put his 
mind to work on this matter and, being a 
practical man, he has brought out as a re- 
sult of his concentration o{ thought, one of 
the most useful tiles for all kinds of business 
that is in the market to-da\-. These hies 
cases are indorsed by such men as Rev. Fred 
Brown, La Harpe, Illinois; Rev. Marion D. 
Shutler, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Rev. Cyrus 
Northrup, president of the University of 
Minnesota; Rev, William Stevens Perr\-, 
Bishop of Iowa, and many others. The 
business of manufacturing these files has 
grown on his hands ver\- largely and as the 
files become known it will still more large!)- 
increase. 

On the 23d of April, 1884, Mr. Grange 
was united in marriage with Miss Florence 
Douglas, a native of Minnesota, born in 
1 868, and a daughter of Henry and Mary 
Douglas. By this union four children have 
been born, three of whom are now living: 
Earl, Ross and John. Mrs. Grange departed 
this life September 23, 1892, dying in the 
full assurance of faith. For his second wife, 
on June 19, 1893, Mr. Grange married Miss 
Helen Tibbetts, a native of Dodge county, 
Minnesota, and daughter of Thomas |. and 
Helen Tibbetts. 

In 1896 Mr. Grange moved to Wheaton, 
Illinois, where he remained for about 
nine months. F"rom Wheaton he was called 
to Malta, where he now enjoys the pleasant 
and profitable pastorate with the full con- 
fidence and respect of his parishoners. 
Besides being pastor of the church, Mr. 
Grange is pursuing his business oi file mak- 



ing. Although he has resided in Malta a com- 
paratively short time he has made many 
friends and his mfluence is very great. 



w 



ILLIAM L. KING, a farmer residing 
on st-rtiuii ?. Sycamore t<.)\vnsliip, 
was burn 011 the farm \\-here he now resides 
December 7, 1872, and was the onl\- son of 
Alfred and Mary Belinda (Evans) King, of 
whom mention is made elsewhere in this 
work. When seven years of age, the family 
mo\ed to a farm one-half mile north in 
Genoa township, and on that farm and one 
adjoining, owned by his father, he remained 
until his marriage, in the spring of 1894. 
In the district schools he obtained his edu- 
cation, attending principally in the winter 
months until twenty years of age. He has 
grown up on the farm and has always given 
his attention to agricultural pursuits. At 
the age of twenty he rented his father's 
place (jne season, then married and came to 
his present farm, which consists of one hun- 
dred and thirty-seven acres. 

Mr. King was married February 21, 
1894, to Miss Julia Mary Whitacre, a daugh- 
ter of Edwin A. and Susan (Warner) Whit- 
acre, both of whom are natives of Muncie 
township, L}coming county, Pennsylvania, 
the former born December 2, 1844, and the 
latter June 28, 1844. They were married 
in Pennsylvania in 1868, and there resided 
until 1873, when the}' removed to Spring 
township, Boone county, Illinois, where 
they resided until February, 1884, when 
they came to Sycamore township, De Kalb 
county, where Mr. Whitacre has a farm of 
two hundred and four acres. They were 
the parents of six children: James, Julia 
Mary, Alfred. Arthur, William and Leslie. 

To Mr. and Mrs. King one child has 



",64 



THK BIOGRAPHICAL RKCORI). 



been born. Doroth)- The}- reside in a 
pleasant home where Mr. King is engaged 
in general farming. Since taking possession 
of the farm, he has put in tiling and has re- 
built the house, erected outbuildings and 
made considerable repairing. The place is 
in good condition, and the farm is a \er\' 
productive one. In politics Mr. King is a 
Republican. 



AKAMOXT NOBLE HOLLEMBEAK 
is a well-known retired farmer residing 
in Genoa, one of the few living pioneers of 
Dc Kalb county. He was born in the town 
of Warsaw. Genesee county. New York, 
February 5, 1816, and is the sou of Ruloff 
W. HoUembeak. whn was born m Shure- 
ham, \"ermont, about 1785. He was a 
hatter by trade, and moved to Genesee 
county, New York, prior to 1816, and later 
moved to Crawford county. Pennsylvania. 
His death occurred in Crawford county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1830, at the age of forty- 
five years. He married Electa Ames, a 
daughter of Barnabus Ames, who married a 
Miss Noble. The Ames' are mi old New 
England family. To Ruloff \V. and Electa 
Holleuibeak, nine children were born, two 
of whom died in infancy. Those attaining 
maturity were: Electa, Bets\-, Aramont 
N , Alfred, Abram, William, and Amy. 
Of these. Electa, Betsx', Alfred and 
.Abram are deceased. The paternal grand- 
father, Abraham HoUembeak, was a native 
of Vermont, and when a young man moved 
to Canada, and later to Crawford county, 
Pennsylvania, where he died when about 
ninety years old. His wife was Miss Lo- 
vina Lord. Ruloff W. Holleinbeak was a 
descendant of one of three brothers, lohn. 



Clark and George, who came from Holland 
prior to the Revolutionary war. 

The subject of this sketch vvas about six 
years old when his parents moved to Beaver, 
Crawford county, Pennnsylvania. His fa- 
ther died when he was about fourteen years 
(jf age, and he continued under the parental 
roof until the age of si.xteen years, when he 
went to Conneaiit Lake. Pennsylvania, 
where he served an apprenticeship of three 
years in learning the wagonmaker's trade. 
He then returned to Conneaut, Ohio, and 
worked about three years, and from there 
went to his old home in Pennsylvania. On 
the 1 2th of January, 1838, in Crawford 
ccjunt), Pennsylvania, he was united in 
marriage with Miss Parmelia Decker, Elder 
[esse Church officiating. She is a native ol 
.Manchester, Genesee county. New York, 
born May 17, 1S17, and a daughter of Fred- 
erick and Amy (Barney) Decker. She em- 
igrated to Crawford county, Pennsylvania, 
with her mother, her father having died in 
New York. 

Immediately after his marriage Mr. Hol- 
lembeak came to Boone county, Illinois, 
and spent the winter at Shattuck's Grove. 
Leaving his wife at the Grove he went to 
Chicago and found work at his trade during 
the winter. On his return in the spring he 
built a log house on his claim, of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres, which was in De Kalb 
county, and that season broke twenty 
acres. Mr. HoUembeak has still his patent 
from the government, the land never hav- 
ing been transferred. In his log cabin he 
put up a bench, using the house for a shop 
as well as dwelling. In an early day Mr. 
HoUembeak had quite a reputation for cur- 
ing poll evil in horses. On that farm he 
resided until 1877, and during the interven- 
ing- years, like all other settlers, had his 




A. N. HOLLEMBEAK. 




MRS. A. N. HOLLEMBEAK. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



369 



seasons of prosperity and seasons of adver- 
sity. On the whole he has, however, done 
better than most men who began as he did 
with nothing but wilHng hands and strong 
heart for capital. Being of an ingenious 
turn of mind he has in\ented and taken out 
patents on barb wire and various other de- 
\'ices, including a wind mill, which he man- 
ufactured for a number of years. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Hollembeak six chil- 
dren have been born. ( i ) Delia Ann married 
Frederick Totten and they have three chil- 
dren, Charles, William and Etta. Charles 
married Zeni F. Ploss and has had four 
children, George, Fern, Ruth and Frank, 
deceased. William married Ella Sheely, 
and they have hve children, Ethel, Flossie, 
Frederick, Annie and Grace. William died 
in July, 1S98. Etta married Frank Cham- 
plain, and their three children are Blanche, 
William and Louie. (2) Alfred S. married 
Blanche Cohoon. (3) Henrj- C. first mar- 
ried Emily Sack\-ille, and they had two 
children, Emily, deceased, and Oscar. His 
second union was with Millie Noble. (4) 
Emily married George Ide, and their chil- 
dren were Harry and Ralph, both deceased. 
(5) Ruloff W. married Emma Brown, and 
their children are Harry and Roy. (6) 
Ralph D. married Lily Brown, and they 
have one child living, Helen. 

In 1877 Mr. Hollembeak erected a com- 
fortable cottage in Genoa where he moved 
with his family, and has since been li\ing 
quietly at peace with the world. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hollembeak, are Spiritualists in re- 
ligious belief. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican, and in times passed took an active 
interest in political affairs. He served as 
supervisor of his township two- terms, sev- 
eral terms as assessor, and also held other 
1 minor offices, and served six years as police 



justice in Genoa. For about forty years 
he has been a member of the Masonic 
lodge at Genoa. 

On the I2th of January, 1898, Mr. and 
Mrs. Hollembeak celebrated their sixtieth 
wedding anniversary. .\bout thirty relatives 
were present to partake of the festi\-ities. 
The day was spent in an enjoyable manner 
and all had a glorious good time. An 
elaborate dinner was served, the tables 
fairly groaning under the load of good 
things. 

.\t one table the host and hostess sat 
with their o\vn family as follows: Mrs. A. 
X. Pond. Mr. Hollembeak's sister: William 
Hollembeak, his brother: Edgar Phelps, 
son of his sister, Betsey Phelps, and Mrs. 
Gardner, daughter of his sister, Mrs. Farr. 
The children sat at the table as they did 
when they were all living at home. Delia 
Ann and Alfred sat next their father, while 
Ralph, Yuluff and Emily were placed next 
to their mother in the order of their ages, 
the line being broken by the absence of 
Henry. Delia Ann is the oldest and Ralph 
the youngest child. On this table an elegant 
cake was placed in which sixty candles 
were burning, emblematic of the number of 
years of connubial bliss. The other table 
was surrounded by the rest of the relatives. 

The reception room was beautifully 
decorated with evergreen, flowers, etc., 
presenting a very pretty appearance. On 
the east wall over the parlor door were the 
words "welcome," on the south wall the 
words " i838-Anniversary-i898 " and on 
the west " Sixtieth. .Asa token of respect 
the relatives presented Mr. and Mrs. Hol- 
lembeak with a handsomely made oak ex- 
tension table and their own children gave 
them a beautiful set of dining-room chairs. 
It was indeed a pleasant and most unusual 



370 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



affair and those who were in attendance 
will long remember it as one of the happi- 
est events of their lives. About dusk the 
guests departed for their respective homes 
after wishing the host and hostess many 
happy returns of the day. 

Those present were: Messrs. and Mes- 
dames William Hollembeak, Edgar, Phelps, 
Frank Hollembeak, Abram Hollembeak, 
George Blanchard and the Misses Eva 
Phelp and Grace Hollembeak, of Sycamore; 
iMr. and Mrs. Ralph Hollembeak and daugh- 
ter, of Elgin; Messrs. and Mesdames A. H. 
Pond, D. S. Brown, A. R. Cohoon, A. Co- 
hoon, Gardner and Ralph Hollembeak, of 
Genoa; Mr. and Mrs. Will Pond, of DeKalb. 



JOHN TISCHHOUSER, contractor and 
builder, resides on De Kalb avenue. 
Sycamore, Illinois, is a native of Switzer- 
land, born in the village of Sevelen, Can- 
ton St. Gallen, December 29, 1S49, and is 
the son of John and Rosa (Gedint) Tisch- 
houser, the former born in Russia, but was 
reared in Canton St. Gallen, Switzerland, 
August 15, 1 81 3, and the latter in Canton 
Grau-Buenden, Switzerland. The paternal 
grandfather, Simon Tischhouser, learned 
the confectioner's trade in Brussels and 
.Antwerp, worked many years in England, 
came to America, and made his way to St. 
Louis, where he built and operated the first 
baker's oven in the city, or village as it was 
then. He recrossed the Atlantic, worked 
for a time in Spain, then went to Italy, and 
later joined the army of Napoleon. He was 
in the Russian campaign, was captured, and 
later joined the Russian army, and in due 
time was commissioned captain, a position 
he held for eight years, and then retired on 
a pension. He was six feet six inches in 



height, was never sick, never needed glasses, 
teeth good until his death, heavy head of 
hair, and \ery powerful and vigorous during 
his entire life. He died at the age of ninet\-- 
nine years and seven months. 

John Tischhouser, the father of our sub- 
ject, studied veterinary surgery seven years 
in Switzerland, after which he practiced the 
profession there until coming to America, 
and on his arrival here resumed practice, 
and continued the same until his death. He 
died at the residence of a daughter in Mich- 
igan in 1894. Like his father before him, 
he was an e.xceedingly strong man and 
could easily carrv se\-en hundred pounds 
weight. In height he was six feet four 
inches, and weighed two hundred and fifty 
pounds. His wife, Rosa Gedint, was the 
daughter of Casper Gedint, who in middle 
life was accidental!}' killed in the forest on the 
mountain side by a log rolling on him. 
His wife, Catherina, died in Switzerland at 
the age of seventy-eight years. Mrs. Rosa 
Tischhouser died in 1S71. She was the 
mother of seven children, six of whom are 
\'et living. 

John Tischhouser, our subject, lived in 
Switzerland until the age of sixteen years, 
and there received his education in the pub- 
lic schools. Leaving home, he went to Ant- 
werp by rail, thence by canal to the sea, 
and embarked April 6, 1865, in a three- 
masted sailing vessel, for the United States. 
In mid-ocean his vessel spoke a steamer 
conveying news of Lincoln's assassination. 
Our subject was so delighted to see a vessel 
with other human beings — anything from 
land — that he climbed the mast to watch it 
as long as visible. Passengers were not 
allowed in the riggings, but Mr. Tischhouser 
being a venturesome youth, climbed to the 
top of the mast and took a gold ball from 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ifr 



it. He was arrested by a sailor and taken 
before the captain, but so won his favor 
that he was not punished, and the captain 
became a good friend to him during the rest 
of the voyage. It was a stormy passage, 
and their vessel was driven nearly to the 
coast of Greenland. Its masts were blown 
away, supplies of food ran low, and water 
was very scarce and very foul — worse than 
pond water — yet passengers would have 
been glad to steal even a pint of it had 
guards not been kept over the water barrels. 

After a voyage of one hundred and four 
days and four days in quarantine, landed at 
Castle Garden, New York, June 13, 1865. 
After a few days spent in New York, by rail he 
came west to Chicago where he secured 
work as hostler in a hotel at thirt)- dollars 
a month, a munificent income to a foreign 
born bo_\-. The work kept him up nearl\' 
all night, and was too fatiguing, so he quit 
and worked in a brick yard for a time on 
Goose Island at two dollars and a half per 
day, and thought himself a millionaire. He 
next went to Ivane county, Illino-s, and 
worked on a farm near Dundee the greater 
part of the year at twenty-five dollars per 
month. Being a large and strong youth 
and a good worker he always commanded 
the highest wages. From Dundee he went 
to Davenport, Io\\a, and worked oti the 
farm of a fellow countryman at good wages 
and then went with some friends to St. 
Louis, and from there to southern Illinois 
where he worked in a saw mill for about 
eighteen months, after which he spent 
nearl)' a year in Wisconsin and Minnesota, 
and from the latter state returned to Wis- 
consin, and at Oshkosh worked two sum- 
mers and spent one winter in saw mills 
and a lumber camp. 

From the saw mills and lumber camps 



of Wisconsin he crossed the plains and spent 
about a year in Oregon and California, 
then returned east, and at Des Moines, 
Iowa, worked one year on the water tower, 
and while there had an e.xciting e.\perience, 
narrowly escaping death by stepping off the 
river bridge a few seconds before it went 
down under the weight of some si.\ hundred 
and forty ponies that stampeded, nearly the 
entire number getting on the bridge at 
once, instead of a few at a time, as it was 
intended should be done. From Des Moines 
he went to West Bend, Wisconsin, where 
during the next four years he finished 
learning the carpenter's trade which he had 
previously begun. After spending two years 
at Kenosha, Wisconsin, he went to Chicago 
where he remained until .April, 1875, when 
he removed to Sycamore, Illinois, where he 
has since continued to reside, engaged in 
contracting and building. Since removing 
to Sycamore he has erected eighty-seven 
barns in the country, thirt3--two residences 
in the city of S_\-camore, fourteen residences 
in the country near by, and about twenty 
residences, stores and school-houses in Kock- 
ford, Belvidere, Kirkland, Kingston, Hamp- 
shire and other surrounding towns. For 
Joseph Glidden, near De Kalb, he erected 
one of the largest barns in the state, being 
sixty-fi\'e by one hundred and fifty feet. At 
Kenosha, Wisconsin, he built a barn sixty- 
four by two hundred feet, with an extension 
for mill purposes. 

Mr. Tischhouser was united in marriage 
January 2, 1872, with Miss Louisa Claire 
Leech, a native of Kenosha, Wisconsin, 
and a daughter of John E. Leech, of Lan- 
caster, England, who married a Miss Tur- 
ner, of Yorkshire, England, and a daugh- 
ter of Abraham Turner. By this union 
there are seven children: .\rthur, a gradu- 



57= 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ate of the Sycamore high school, and now 
foreman in the can factory; Delford Lee, 
working in the factory under his brother; 
Rosa May and Millie Edna, at home; John, 
deceased; Clarence Raymond and John Ed- 
ward, at home. Fraternally Mr. Tischhoiis- 
er is a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and of the National Union. 
In politics he is a Democrat, and is now 
serving as alderman of the city. 



ARTHUR ALLISON is numbered among 
the young and progressive farmers of 
De Kalb county. He is a native of Frank- 
lin township, born on the farm where he 
now resides October lO, 1869. His father, 
James T. Allison, was born in Burnside 
township, Clearfield county, Pennsylvania, 
February 22, 1S32. The paternal grand- 
parents, Andrew and Mary (Lee) Allison, 
were both natives of Pennsylvania and the 
parents of four children, of whom James T. 
is the sole survivor. He was left an orphan 
when but two years old by the death of his 
mother, and resided with his father until 
ten years of age and then made his home 
with his grandfather, Jacob Lee, until he 
was eighteen years old, his education be- 
ing received in the district schools of his 
native state. In 1855 he came to Illinois 
and settled in Boone count}-, where he 
worked by the day and month. He made 
his first purchase of land in 1861, buying a 
tract of forty acres, to which he kept adding 
as his means increased until he has now one 
hundred and sixty acres of well cultivated 
land. He was married on the 20th of Sep- 
tember, i860, to Margaret Wood, a native 
of Canada, and to them were born three 
children, Elizabeth, John F. and Arthur. 
The two sons now run the home farm. 



Elizabeth married Charles Miner, a mer- 
chant of Kirkland. For twelve years James 
C. Allison served as school director and was 
five years road commissioner. In politics 
he is a Republican. 

On the home farm Arthur Allison grew 
to manhood and attended school at Kirk- 
land for two years after leaving his district 
school. He then entered the employ of the 
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railsvaj- 
Company and was fireman on an engine for 
five years. On the 7th of July, 1892, he 
married Myrtle Byers, a daughter of A. B. 
Byers, of South Grove township, De Kalb 
county, and they have one daughter, Ruth E. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allison have a farm of one 
hundred and twenty acres of good land, a 
portion of her father's estate. They reside, 
howe\'er, on his father's farm, where he is 
engaged in general farming and stock rais- 
ing. In politics he is an ardent Republican. 



HENRY H. SLATER, who is engaged 
in the general mercantile business at 
Genoa, Illinois, is one of the best known 
citizens in the northern part uf De Kalb 
count}-. He was born in Hunterdon coun- 
ty, New Jersey, October 31, 1838, and is 
the son of Samuel Slater, and the grandson of 
Henry Slater, who spent his entire life in New 
Jersey, and who died when about seventy-five 
years of age. The family are of Scotch de- 
scent. Samuel Slater was born in Hunterdon 
county. New Jersey, in 1S16. He married 
Rhoda Burroughs a daughter of Timothy and 
Phebe (Green) Burroughs, the latter being a 
daughter of Joseph Green of New Jersey, 
who married Elizabeth Gillis, a native of 
Ireland, who came to America when about 
fourteen years old. Timothy Burroughs 
was a great-grandson of John Burroughs, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



373 



who moved from Long Island to Trenton, 
New Jersey, and was one of the first sher- 
iffs of that county. He was followed by 
his son John, and the latter by a son of the 
same name, who was the father of Timothy. 
The third John served in the Revolutionary 
war, and on that account was a pensioner 
of the general government. His death oc- 
curred in 1835, when about eighty-five 
years old. He married Rhoda Hendrick- 
son, a daughter of Thomas Hendrickson. 
They became the parents of five chil- 
dren, of whom Rhoda, the mother of our 
subject, was fourth in order of birth. She 
and the youngest of the family, the now ven- 
erable Isaac I. Burroughs, are the only sur- 
vivors. Mrs. Rhoda Burroughs lived to be 
ninety years of age. Of the children born 
to Samuel and Rhoda Slater, two survive, 
our subject and Martha, wife of Chauncey 
D. Flint, an engineer of Chicago. 

Henry H. Slater spent his boyhood in 
his native state, and there remained until 
sixteen years of age. His education was 
obtained in the district school and in a pri- 
vate school in Warren county, New Jersey. 
On coming to Illinois, he went with his 
father to a farm two and a half miles east 
of Genoa, and worked with him until the 
age of twenty-one years, when his father 
gave him a farm which he proceeded to cul- 
tivate, and in which he continued until the 
second year of the war for the Union. He 
enlisted in Company A, One Hundred and 
Fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, at Genoa, 
September 2, 1872, and was mustered in 
with his regiment at Dixon, and was soon 
afterwards sent to the front. The regiment 
joined the main army at Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, and the first battle in which it was 
engaged was at Resaca, Georgia. It was 
later in the Atlanta campaign, and with 



Sherman on the march to the sea. 
While at Raleigh, North Carolina, they 
heard the news of the surrender of Lee 
and the fall of Richmond. The regiment 
then marched through Richmond, Virginia, 
and after viewing the battle grounds, pro- 
ceeded to Washington, where it participat- 
ed in the Grand Review. It was mustered 
out at Washington, and discharged at Chi- 
cago, in June, 1865. 

Returning home Mr. Slater opened a 
general store in Genoa, later adding a stock 
of drugs. In 1870 he disposed of his store 
and went into business at Gardner, Illinois, 
but in 1873 returned to Genoa and again 
entered into the mercantile business. In 
1876 he built a large brick store room and 
later took his son into partnership. The 
son is now deceased and the firm name is 
now H. H. Slater. 

Mr. Slater was married January 23, 
1867, in Genoa, to Miss Amaretta B. Stiles, 
born in Fraleysburg, Canada, just across 
the line from Vermont, and a daughter of 
Asahel Stiles, a native of Benson, Vermont, 
born August 14, 1797, and died in Genoa 
February 7, 1883. He came to Illinois in 
November, 1848, coming by canal and lakes 
to Chicago and by teams to De Kalb 
county, locating in Sycamore township, 
three miles south of Genoa. He was one 
of the builders of the court house in Syca- 
more and was by trade a carpenter. His 
son, Aaron K. Stiles, was county clerk of De 
Kalb county for twelve years. Asahel 
Stiles married Fannie Sm.ith, a native of 
Sudbury, Vermont, a daughter of Enoch 
and Mary (Wilson) Smith, natives of Eng- 
land. To our subject and wife two chil- 
dren were born, Samuel and Margaret. 
The former was for a time in business with 
his father, but is now deceased. 



11^ 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Fraternally Mr. Slater is a member of 
the Masonic lodge at Genoa, and also of 
the Grand Army of the Republic. Well 
known throughout the count)', he is a man 
who has many warm friends and as a busi- 
ness man has always been enterprising and 
up with the times. 



JONAS INGMANSON is now living re- 
tired in the city of Sycamore. He was 
born March 19, 182S, in the province of 
Smolen, Sweden, and is the son of Ingman 
and Elna (Johnson) Swanson, both of whom 
were natives of Sweden. The father died 
when our subject was but one year old, and 
the mother when he was but sixteen years 
of age. He was thus left to be brought up 
by relatives. Until the age of thirteen he 
was taught by a private teacher, a lady who 
passed from house to house, hearing recita- 
tions and giving instructions. In 1841 the 
state school system extended to Smolen, and 
our subject attended the public school until 
his fifteenth year, when he was confirmed. 
At the age of sixteen our subject com- 
menced to learn engineering, and from that 
time until 1857 he ran a boat on a small 
lake near his birth place. It was while thus 
employed that the only accident that ever 
befell him occurred. ' During a violent 
storm. April 11, 1852, the machinery became 
misplaced, and in his efforts to get it right, 
the boat pitched in a rough sea, and his left 
hand was caught in the gearing, severing 
two fingers. During his twenty years in 
charge of engines in Sweden, he never had 
the slightest accident to machinery or en- 
gmes. During the construction of the first 
railroad in Sweden, he was employed in the 
works, and for six years ran an engine on 
the road. Later he went to Gottenberg, 



and was employed as an engineer in a saw 
mill until his emigration to America. 

On Jul)- 18, 1S70, Mr. Ingmanson sailed 
from Mahne, for New Castle, England, 
thence went by rail to Liverpool, where he 
took a vessel on the Inman line, for New 
York. Arriving in the latter city, he came 
direct to Sycamore, where a brother had 
preceded him, reaching here August 9, 1870, 
being nearly a month after sailing from 
Malme. He secured what labor he could 
find for a time, then for a year ran an en- 
gine for the Reuben EUwood Manufacturing 
Company. After the great Chicago fire, he 
went to that city, and for six or seven 
months, received the high wages paid for 
labor after the disaster. On returning to 
Sycamore, he worked in the Marsh Harvest- 
er Works for a time, and later ran an en- 
gine for the Russell Manufacturing Com- 
pany. 

Leaving the emplo}- of the latter com- 
pany, Mr. Ingmanson went to Rockford, 
Illinois, and established a Paint Manufactur- 
ing Company, which he operated for four 
years. He then returned to Sycamore for 
a short time, and then moved to Chicago, to 
be near his children, who were all employed 
there. After remaining in Chicago four 
years, he again returned to Sycamore, and 
established the Russell \'arnish and Color 
Company, which he conducted some three 
or four years. He then ran an engine for 
the Patton Manufacturing Company two 
years, since which time he has lived retired 
in his comfortable home in Sycamore. Ac- 
cording to Swedish custom, he takes his 
last name from his father's first name. 

Mr. Ingmanson was married in Kristian- 
stad, Sweden, April 3, 1862, to Miss Elsie 
Junson, who was born on the old family es- 
tate, known as the Holma District Scone, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



375 



province of Usbue, and a daughter of Juns 
and Elna (Nelson) Larson. By this union 
there are nine children, seven of whom are 
living. Emma married Mongue Selberg, a 
blacksmith and machinist, by whom she has 
three children, Oscar, Benjamin and Clar- 
ence. Albert, who is a machinist by trade, 
married Tessie Randall, since deceased, and 
is now living with his parents. Emil, also 
a machinist by trade, married Ella John- 
son and has now a position in a wholesale 
house in Chicago. Emily married Edwin 
Nelson, a molder by trade. Jennie and 
Augusta hold positions in mercantile estab- 
lishments in Chicago. Esther, a graduate 
of the Sycamore schools, yet remains at 
home. 

In politics Mr. Ingmanson is a Republic- 
an, while he and his family are members 
of the Episcopal church. He is a distant 
relative of Christine Nillson, the celebrated 
Swedish singer. His brother, Andrew Ing- 
manson, first discovered the possibilities of 
her voice, and gave financial aid to secure 
her first instruction. When in this country, 
on one of her annual tours, she was solicit- 
ed to give concerts in Sycamore to help the 
Swedish Lutheran church, but would not 
consent. Mr. Ingmanson then visited her 
in Chicago, the result being two concerts in 
Sycamore which resulted in a large profit 
for the church. 



JOSEPH EDMOND PARKER is a well 
known citizen of Sycamore. He was 
born in Spencer county, Indiana, July 14, 
1845, and is the son of Henry N. and Mary 
Ann (Stillwell) Parker, the former a native 
of Ontario county. New York, and the latter 
of Campbell count)-, Kentucky. Henry 



Parker was born in October, 1814, and was 
the son of James and Sarah (Hobbs) Parker, 
a minister of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, who died in New York, many years 
ago. Henry N. Parker had five brothers and 
one sister. The latter, Louisa, married 
Robert Graham, but both are now deceased. 
Lorenzo Dow, a Methodist minister, now 
deceased. He was named after Lorenzo 
Dow, who was a cousin of J. E. Parker's 
grandfather. Charles is still living and is a 
resident of Liberty, Labette county, Kan- 
sas. The deceased are Parley, Orison and 
Russell. 

In 1839, Henry N. Parker moved from 
his native state to Indiana, where he en- 
gaged in farming and where he resided until 
1852, when he came to DeKalb county, 
Illinois, and located in Kingston. Purchas- 
ing a farm, he operated the same until his 
death. May 2, 1898. For many years he 
was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and was an active worker in that 
body. Politically, he was a Republican 
from the organization of the party. Physi- 
cally, he was a large, well built man, six 
feet, two inches in height. His wife, Mary 
Ann Stillwell, is the daughter of Joseph 
Stillwell, a native of Kentucky. Her par- 
ents died in Kentucky, and Shelbyville, Illi- 
nois, respectively. Religiously she is also 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Eight children were born to Henry 
N. and Mary A. Parker, as follows: Martha, 
who died in infancy; Sarah Ann, wife of J. 
D. Woolsey, living in the township of Syca- 
more: Louisa, wife of Volaski Hix, de- 
ceased, living in the city of Sycamore; 
John R., residing in Chicago; Martha 
J., a teacher in the public schools of 
Chicago; Mary Adelaine, wife of Harry 
Hawks, of Freeport, Illinois; and Fannie, 



17(^ 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



wife of Walter Poust, living on the old 
homestead. 

The subject of this sketch was eight 
years old when he accompanied his parents 
to Kingston, DeKalb county, Illinois, and 
on the home farm grew to manhood, while 
receiving his education in the district schools. 
At the age of twenty-two years he began 
farming for himself on land leased of his 
father. He continued to be thus employed 
for about ten years, when he accepted a 
position with the Ellvvood Manufacturing 
Company of Sycamore, with which com- 
pany he remained for about fifteen years, 
having charge of the packing and shipping 
and also ofthe collections. Having learned 
the carpenter's trade in his youth, on leav- 
ing the Ellwood Manufacturing Company, he 
engaged at his trade for a time, but is now 
living a retired life. 

In September, 1869, Mr. Parker was 
imited in marriage with Miss Mary Jane 
Parker, born in New York, and a daughter 
of John and Mary (Anderson) Parker, na- 
tives of Ireland, who came in their youth 
with their parents from the old country. 
She died in June, 1887, bearing one son, 
Samuel Fay, who is employed in the office 
of the True Republican at Sycamore, Illi- 
nois. Mr. Parker was married the second 
time, April 7, 1892, to' Eliza Jane Macke}', 
a daughter of Harrison and Mary (Hall) 
Mackey. Her father was a nati\-e of Ulster 
county. New York, anti bv trade was a 
blacksmith, which he follnwed in earl_\ life. 
On coming west in the spring of 1839 he 
located in Mayfield township, De Kalb 
county, where he began farming and where 
his death occurred August 22, 1890. His 
wife. Mary, died January 22, 1856. They 
had three children as follows; Marv R. , 
now Mrs. H. H. Coleman, of Sycamore; 



Eliza Jane, wife of our subject; and Julia 
Ann, who married John Westlake, and died 
April 8, 1869. (See Sketch of Harrison 
Mackey.) 

When he engaged with the Ellwood 
Manufacturing Company, Mr. Parker re- 
moved to Sycamore, which has since been 
his home. He is now living on Main street 
in a good, comfortable dwelling house, 
which he has remodeled and which is situ- 
ated on an attractive ground. Mrs. Parker 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church ol Sycamore. Politically he is a 
Republican, and fraternally a member of 
Sycamore Lodge, No. 134, A. F. & A. M., 
Sycamore Chapter, No. 49, R. A. M., and 
Sycamore Commandery, No. 13, K. T. For 
many years he has taken an active part in 
this order and has served as a delegate to 
the various grand bodies. He has been 
worshipful master of the blue lodge, and 
eminent commander ofthe commander\-. 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM VAN WERT, who 
resides on section 9, Franklin town- 
ship, is not only a veteran of the war for 
the Union, but comes of good old Revolu- 
tionary stock, his great-grandfather, El- 
dred Van Wert, being a soldier in the Rev- 
olutionary war. Eldred \'an \\"ert was a 
cousin to Isaac \'an W'ert, who captured 
Major Andn,-. The \"an Werts are of Hol- 
land-Dutch ancestry, and were earl} set- 
tlers of the state of New York, where El- 
dred \"an \\'ert was horn. f-lis son, Abra- 
ham Van Wert, a farmer by occupation, 
was also a native of that state Hugh \'an 
Wert, the father of our subject, married 
Sarah Robins, who was also a native of 
New York. They became the parents of 
si.x children, of whom William and Thomas 




CAPT. WILLIAM VAN WEKT. 




MRS. WILLIAM VAN WERT, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



381 



R. are the only survivors. The deceased 
were Jacob, Susan, Benjamin and Henry. 
Hugh Van Wert in early life was a farmer 
and followed agricultural pursuits in his na- 
tive state. In 1846 he removed to Michi- 
gan and settled on a farm in Hillsdale coun- 
ty. He there read medicine and was ad- 
mitted to practice, and has since followed 
that profession. He served during the Civil 
war for a term of two years and was wound- 
ed at the battle of South Mountain. He 
died in Hillsdale county, Michigan, Septem- 
ber 28, 1898, at the age of ninety years. 
For some years he drew a pension of seven- 
teen dollars per month for services in the 
Civil war. 

William Van Wert is a native of Sara- 
toga county. New York, born April 29, 
1839. He was but si.\ years of age when 
he accompanied his parents to Hillsdale 
county, Michigan, where he grew to man- 
hood and received his education in the dis- 
trict schools. On the 20th of April, 1861, 
at La Porte, Indiana, he enlisted in Com- 
pany F, Ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, 
under the first call for three months' men. 
At the expiration of his term of service he 
enlisted in Company C, Twenty-ninth In- 
diana Volunteer Infantry at I^a Porte, Indi- 
ana, to serve three years or during the war. 
He was first made a sergeant of his com- 
pan}', afterward promoted first lieutenant, 
and later commissioned captain. His regi- 
ment was in very active service during al- 
most his entire term of enlistment, and with 
it he participated in the battles of Phillippi, 
West Virginia; Shiloh, Stone River, Buz- 
zard Roost, Resaca, all the battles of the 
Atlanta campaign; Columbia, Tennessee; 
Franklin, Nashville, Wise Fork, together 
with various skirmishes. At the battle of 
Shiloh Captain \'an Wert \vas badly wound- 



ed, and because of that wound he now 
draws a pension of twenty dollars per month. 
With his regiment he was discharged, Sep- 
tember 27, [865, at Salisbury, North Caro- 
lina. 

.■\fter his discharge, Captain \'an Wert 
returned to La Porte, Indiana, and then en- 
gaged in farming until the fall of 1S67, 
when he removed to Boone county, Illinois, 
and worked on farms by the month for a 
time. On the 20th of February, 1868, he 
married Elizabeth A. Shirley, a native of 
Winnebago county. Illinois, and a daughter 
of Lewis and Lucinda (Keith) Shirley, both 
natives of Richland county, Ohio, who came 
to Illinois, in 1S40, and settled on govern- 
ment land, an eighty-acre tract of which 
they secured at a dollar and twenty- five 
cents per acre. That tract was only the 
beginning, Mr. Shirley acquiring before his 
death over one thousand acres of good 
land. He died in Cherry \'alle\-, Winne- 
bago county. May 13. 1S98. The Shirley 
family were also patriotic, some of the an- 
cestry of Mr. Shirley serving in the Revolu- 
tionary war and in the second war with 
Great Britain. 

In 1875, Captain Van Wert came to De 
Kalb county, and purchased the farm where 
he now resides, consisting of one hundred 
acres of good tillable land. He has been fairly 
successful in his farming operations, being 
practical in all his methods. His interest 
the Civil war is kept alive by membership in 
Thomas Humphrey Post, No. 530, G. A. R. , 
at Kirkland. He is also a member of Kirk- 
land Camp, No. 141, M. W. A., of Kirk- 
land. In politics he is an enthusiastic Re- 
publican, believing firmly in the principles 
of the party, and acting up to his convic- 
tions by giving earnest support to its candi- 
dates. 



3»- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



JACOB GIVENS is one of the old and 
substantial farmers of Malta township, 
his farm being located on section 34. He 
was born in Charleston, Montgomery coun- 
ty. New \ork, April 12, 1S15, and is the 
son of Joseph and Rachel (Stewart) Givens. 
By occupation Joseph Givens was a miller 
in early life, but in later years abandoned 
it for agricultural pursuits. He removed 
from Charleston to Otsego countv, New 
York, where he purchased a farm, upon 
which he spent the remainder of his life. 
He was a man of pure morals and upright 
principles, whose life was governed by the 
golden rule. He died in 1838, at the age 
of seventy-three years, his wife having pre- 
ceded him, dying in 1833, at the age of fifty- 
six years. Their family consisted of ten 
children, and Jacob is the only surviving 
member. 

The subject of this sketch was reared 
in Otsego county. New York, where he re- 
ceived a fairly good education for the time. 
He remained under the parental roof until 
after he attained his majorit}', assisting in 
the cultivation of the home farm. When 
twenty-two years of age, he commenced 
working out by the day and month. On 
the 1 6th of December, 1841, he was united 
in marriage with Miss Deborah Stewart, a 
daughter of Daniel and Hannah Stewart. 
.About two years after this event he bought 
hi.'; first farm of fifty acres in Chemung 
county. New \'ork, where he remained thir- 
teen years, during which time nine children 
were born, two of whom died in infanc}'. 
Those that grew to mature years were Chris- 
topher, born June 4, 1843; Loren G.. June 
9, 1845; Sarah A., .^pril 26, 1847; Albert 
and .Adelbert, twins, July 14, 1848; Har- 
riet E., Februar}- 28, 1S53; and Clarence 
F., August 9, 1855. Of these l,oren G., 



died June 24, i860, and Harriet E. , June 
21. 1895. 

In 1855 Mr. Given sold his farm in Che- 
mung county, New York, and in the fol- 
lowing \'ear removed to Illinois, locating at 
Shabbona Grove, De Kalb county. After 
his removal two more children were born, 
Fidelia A., January i, 1858, and Laura E., 
Noxember 1, 1861. After working on a 
farm in Shabbona Grove for four years, Mr. 
Given removed to Malta, Illinois, where he 
lived about three years, and then purchased 
his present farm of eighty acres which is very 
pleasantly situated. Here he has conducted 
farming on general principles, not running 
to an\- special line. Besides the home 
farm, he owns one hundred and twenty acres 
of land in Dakota. Mrs. Givens, who was 
born at Cayuta, New York, February 14, 
i8t8, died at Malta, May 1, 1895, aged 
seventy-seven years. Mr. Givens has never 
united with any local church, but is an hon- 
est, upright and conscientious man. Po- 
litically he is a Republican. 



DD. BROWN, mayor of the city of De 
Kalb. is one of her choice and trusted 
citizens. From 1879 to the present time 
he has held important offices in the city, 
and has never shrunk from duty, never over- 
looked trifles as too insignificant to be 
noticed, nor never faltered in the pursuit of 
that which inhanced the interest of the peo- 
ple who placed him in office. His motto 
has ever been, not onl\- the greatest good 
to the greatest number, but the greatest 
good to all. 

Mr. Brown is well born and is the son of 
C. M. and Catherine A. ( De Pue) Brown, 
and was born at Belvidere, New Jersey, Au- 
gust 26, 1845. His parents were buth na- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



383 



tives of New Jersey, his father born in Ches- 
ter and his mother in Belvidere. The for- 
mer was of Enghsh extraction and the latter 
of Holland and French parentage. C. M. 
Brown was one of Belvidere's prominent 
business men, and in his younger days ac- 
quired his knowledge of the mercantile busi- 
ness in the city of Newark, New Jersey. 
With his family he removed from Belvidere, 
New Jersey, to Sycamore, Illinois, in 1841, 
and there engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness until 1859, at which time he was 
elected circuit clerk and recorder of De 
Kalb count}'. This position he held and its 
duties he faithfully and conscientiously dis- 
charged for four years. At the expiration 
of this period he removed to Chicago, 
where he engaged in the sta\'e and heading 
business, which he successfully pursued un- 
til [870, when he returned to Sycamore, 
where he died in March of the same year. 
C. M. Brown was twice married, his (irst 
wife, Catherine, the mother of D. D. Brown, 
dying in 1849, when the latter was but four 
years of age. For his second wife he mar- 
ried Miss Louise A. Jackman, a native of 
New York, who survived him, and by whom 
he had three children, two yet living — Fred 
C. , of San Antonia, Texas, and M. L. , a 
commission merchant of Chicago. The 
De Pues were people noted for their intelli- 
gence and influence. The youngest brother 
of Mrs. Brown, Abraham De Pue, was pay- 
master in the navy, while her eldest brother, 
David A.-De Pue, is judge of one of the 
courts in Newark, New Jersey. 

D. D. Brown was reared and educated at 
Sycamore, but took a course at Valparaiso, 
Indiana. At the conclusion of his school 
days he entered the dry -goods store of Rog- 
ers & Wild, where he proved himself an ef- 
ficient and faithful employee. About this 



time the dark and stormy days of the Re- 
bellion were on us. Our nation's honor was 
at stake and men were needed. In obedi- 
ence to the call Mr. Brown enlisted in 1864 
(his age preventing him from an earlier en- 
listment), and served as a member of Com- 
pany F, One Hundred and Thirty-second 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, O. M. Bunnell, 
captain, and T. J. Pickett, colonel. With 
his regiment he served in the Arm}' of the 
Tennessee, with which they were connected 
until the close of the war. He was honor- 
ably discharged at Chicago and returned to 
his home. 

On his return to civil life Mr. Brown en- 
tered into the employ of his father, who 
was at that time engaged in the stave and 
heading business at Chicago, and there re- 
mained one year. In 1867 he obtained a 
position as captain of a passenger steam- 
boat plying between Paducah, Iventucky, 
and Eastport. Tennessee. In 1868 he re- 
turned to Sycamore, where he engaged with 
George P. Wilde, a member of the firm for 
which he worked previous to the war. In 
the spring of 1874 he formed a co-partner- 
ship with C. A. Tindall, of De Kalb, under 
the firm name of Tindall & Brown, in the 
mercantile business, and two years later 
purchased his partner's interest and took 
entire charge of the business, m which he 
continued until 1883, when he sold to 
Charles Reed, of Elburn. At this time he 
formed another partnership with P. G. 
Young in the lumber business, which they 
extensively and successfully pursued under 
the firm name of Brown & Young. In the 
spring of 1892 he sold his interest to Mr. 
Young, since which time he has been en- 
gaged as shipping clerk with the Superior 
Barb Wire Company, afterwards changed 
to the Ell wood Wire and Nail Company, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and which has now been absorbed b)- the 
American Steel cS: \Mre Company. 

On the 8th of February. 1872, Mr. 
Brown was united in marriage with Miss 
Alice E. Ellwood, a daughter of Hiram and 
Sarah (Dygart) Ellwood, and by this union 
two children were born, Zaida E., July 29, 
1878, and Sarah Louise, November 27, 
1 88 1. Mrs. Brown was born at Herkimer, 
New York, October 19, 1851. Her educa- 
tion was begun in the public schools of I)e 
Kalb, and completed in Xavier's Academy, 
Chicago. She is a refined and highly edu- 
cated lady, and a member of the Eastern 
Star. 

Mr. Brown is a decided Republican and 
has been actively interested in the adminis- 
tration of the municipal affairs of De Kalb. 
He \\as elected alderman in 1879 and 
served faithfully and well in said office. 
After serving three terms as alderman, in 
1883, he was elected mayor of the city and 
served four years. In 1891 and in 1892 he 
was elected and served as fire marshal of 
the city. In 1895 he was again elected to 
the office of 'mayor and re-elected in 1897, 
and is yet filling the position. 

Mr. Brown has the entire confidence, 
not only of his political associates, but of 
the entire city of De Kalb. His spotless 
character, his upright life, his amiable and 
sociable disposition, make him a 'desirable 
companion, and increase his already numer- 
ous friends, who are willing to place their 
interests in his hands. He is prominent in 
the Masonic fraternity, and like all good 
fellows, who have deservedly traveled the 
way before him, has had conferred upon 
him the thirty-second degree. He is also a 
member of the Royal Arcanum and the G. 
A. K. Post, at De Kalb, in the latter of 
which he was commander in 1897. In 



1887 he broadened his mind, and added to 
his already e.xtensive knowledge, by an ex- 
tended tour through Europe, visiting Eng- 
land, Ireland, Scotland, Holland, Germany, 
Belgium, Switzerland, Austria, France and 
Italy. 



LE\I S. HODGE, deceased, was for 
many years a '.veil-known citizen of 
De Kalb county. He was born m Che- 
nango, Broome county. New York, Decem- 
ber 20, 1 81 5, and was reared in his native 
state and there resided until 1853, when he 
came west. When a young man he read 
medicine, but abandoned the medical pro- 
fession for that of the law, which he prac- 
ticed some }ears in his native state and 
after coming to Sycamore, Illinois. He 
was twice married, first to Harriet Davis, 
by whom he had five children, only one 
now surviving, Levi Hodge, of Sitka, 
Alaska. His second union was with Mrs. 
Adelia A. Holroyd, widow of James Hol- 
ro\d, the wedding ceremony being cele- 
brated September 20, 1S90. 

Mrs. Hodge was born in Mongoquinon 
Prairie, St. Joseph county, Michigan, in 
1837. She is the daughter of Daniel M. 
Thurston, a native of Broome county, New 
York, born in August, 1820, and a son of 
Daniel Thurston. He came to Michigan 
when three years of age,. and to Illinois in 
1840, residing for the first two years in 
Chicago. In 1842 he came to De Kalb 
county and located in Kingston township, 
where he engaged in farming for eight jears, 
and selling out purchased a farm in Genoa 
township, where he remained five years. 
He then went back to Michigan/^and there 
lived five \ears. but again returned to Genoa 
tov\nship, where he rented a farm one year 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



38S 



and then went to Bremer county, Iowa, 
where he remained four years. From 
Bremer county he moved to Fort Scott, 
Kansas, but returned to Iowa and died in 
Butler county. He married Melissa D. 
Phelps, daughter of William and Cynthia 
Phelps. She was probably born in Penn- 
sylvania and died at the age of seventy 
years. 

Mrs. Hodge first married in Genoa town- 
ship, July 4, 1855, James Holroyd, who was 
born near Petersborough, Canada, in 1820, 
and died in 188 i. He was the son of \\"ill- 
iam and Mary (Anson) Holroyd, natives of 
Leeds, Yorkshire, England, who emigrated 
to Canada in the spring of 1820. William 
Holroyd was the son of Benjamin, a gentle- 
man farmer in England, who married Grace 
Hardwick. By her first marriage Mrs. 
Hodge became the mother of five children, 
(i) Maggie D. is the wife of Frank J. Drake, 
of Kingston township, by whom she has six 
children: Alta, Edna, Jennie, Warren, 
Birdie and Marie. (2j Grace B. married 
Ira Westover, and the\- have eight children: 
Fannie, Byron, Eva, May, Benjamin, 
Frank, William and Edith. They reside in 
Cerro Gordo county, Iowa. (3) Herbert 
H. married Frankie Hawks, and they reside 
in Kingston, Illinois. (4) lAlbert J. married 
Belle Thurlby, and they have one daughter. 
Myrtle. Their residence is in Martin coun- 
ty, Minnesota. Gu}' W. married Nellie 
McAvoy, and is engaged in the implement 
business in Sycamore. 

Levi S. Hodge was a \er_\' prosperous 
man and was the owner of several farms in 
De Kalb county. For four years prior to 
his death he served as justice of the peace. 
He died February 25, 1897, leaving many 
friends in Sycamore and De Kalb county to 
mourn his loss. Mrs. Hodge is a member 



of the Congregational church of Sycamore 
and also of the Woman's Christian Tem- 
perance Union, in both of which she takes 
a very active part. She is of an artistic 
turn of mind and has some fine portrait 
work of members of her own familv. 



HENRY KLINE, a substantial farmer 
and one of the early settlers of De 
Kalb county, resides on section 8, Franklin 
township. He is a native of Richland 
count}-, Ohio, born March 4, 1822, and is 
the son of Jacob and Susan (Keith) Kline, 
both natives of Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania. They were the parents of ten 
children, John, Adam, William, Jacob, 
Michael, Henry, Simon, Jackson, Margaret 
and Matilda. All are deceased but Simon 
and our subject. The paternal grandfather, 
Jacob Kline, was also a nati\^e of Pennsyl- 
vania and a farmer by occupation. In an 
early day Jacob Kline mo\ed with his fam- 
ily to Richland county, Ohio, and there our 
subject was reared and educated. In 1846 
he came to Illinois and worked by the day 
on farms in Boone county. On the 22d of 
November, 1847, he married Maria I\eith, a 
native of Morgan county, Ohio, and a 
daughter of Bolser and Lucy (Smith) Keith, 
the former a native of Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania, and the latter of New York 
state. Of their family of ten children one 
died in infancy. Those who lived to ma- 
turit\' were Phebe, Michael, Lucinda, 
Rhoda, Maria, Margaret, Bolser, Benjamin 
and Charlotte. The paternal grandfather 
of Mrs. Kline, Peter Keith, was a native of 
Germany and came to .America in an early 
day. Mrs. Kline came west with her pa- 
rents in 1837 to Winnebago county, Illinois, 
where her father purchased one hundred 



!86 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and twent\' acres of f^overnrnent land, to 
which he later added, giving him a large 
and excellent farm. 

For some years Mr. Kline worked at the 
mason's and carpenter's trade, but of late 
years he has given his attention exclusively 
to farming. He purchased the farm where 
he now resides, consisting of one hundred 
and thirty acres, on section 8, Franklin 
township, in 1851. The improvements 
which have been made upon it are quite ex- 
tensive and the farm is now one of the best 
in the township. To Mr. and Mrs. Kline 
six children were born, two of whom died 
in infancy. Those living are Margaret A., 
Bolser, Jacob and l.ibby. Mr. and Mrs. 
Kline are members of the United Brethren 
church and in politics he is an independent, 
voting for men rather than party. While 
he came to this country with but little 
means, by his industry, assisted by his good 
wife, he is now in comfortable circum- 
stances and has the utmost respect of all 
who know him. 



REV. ALVARO ALLEN CROCKER, of 
Genoa. Illinois, was born on the Indian 
reservation, northwest of Batavia, Genesee 
county, New York, April 27, 1826. His 
father, Rev. Allen Crocker, was born in 
Shutesbury, Massachusetts, April 14, 1793, 
and died Februarj- 7, 1 87 1. He began 
preaching at the age of sixteen, and was a 
minister of wonderful power, and considered 
one of the finest sermonizers in the Chris- 
tian denomination in northern Illinois, as 
strong in his ministry as Peter Cartwright. 
He was in active service in the ministry for 
over sixty years. About seven years before 
his death he suffered a stroke of paralysis, 
and at end of that time received two strokes 



in one day. He served in the war of 1812. 
Allen Crocker was a son of Rev. Theopholis 
Crocker, a native of Shutesbury, one of the 
best known ministers in western New York. 
He was quite famous in his day, and an ex- 
tended sketch of his life is found in History 
of the Ministry of Western New York. He 
had a great memory and could repeat the 
book of Revelations entire and whole chap- 
ters in the Gospel. He was a soldier in the 
Rexolutionary war, and also in the war of 
1812. In stature he was quite large, and 
weighed about two hundred pounds. He 
died at the age of ninety two years. The 
family in this country are descended from 
three brothers, who came from England in 
colonial days. For generations the family 
have been deeply religious, a number of 
them including two brothers of Allen 
Crocker, Alfred and Orrin, being in the 
ministry. 

Allen Crocker married Sophronia Tacles, 
born July i^, 1804, near W'joniing, New 
York. Their marriage was solmnized May 
26, 1825. She was a daughter of Alexan- 
der Tacles, a farmer by occupation and 
one of the first settlers of Allen's Creek, in 
Wyoming county, New York. He was born 
in Massachusetts, and was of Scotch de- 
scent. He married Philena Howard, born 
November 26. 1765. their marriage being 
celebrated April 16, 1800. The Tacles 
went from Massachusetts to New York, set- 
tling in Wyoming count)-, when it was all 
heavil}- timbered land. Mrs. Allen Crocker 
was a well educated woman, a graduate of 
Wyoming Academy, after which she en- 
gaged in teaching until after her marriage. 
She became the mother of six children, 
three of whom sur\'ive, our subject and 
Philena, widow of Samuel Stephens; Elvira, 
widow of Gilbert Maxfield. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



38; 



When our subject was thirteen years of 
age the family moved from New York to 
Ohio and for two years resided five miles 
west of Oberlin and two years one and one- 
half miles south of Euclid where his father 
had a charge. They then mo\-ed back to 
Genesee county, New York, locating at 
Bethany Center, where they remained two 
years, and then resided one year six miles 
west of Rochester, New York, from which 
place in 1844 our subject emigrated to Ogle 
county, New York, his father following in 
the spring of 1845. In the spring of 1846, 
Mr. Crocker came to Genoa, and having se- 
cured a certificate, engaged in teaching, an 
occupation in which he continued for nine 
years, five of which he taught in De Kalb 
county, and four in McHenry county. He 
studied theology at Meadville, Pennsyhania, 
in the Christian and Unitarian .Academy, 
and was ordained to the ministry in the 
spring of 1857, in the Christian Chapel, at 
Belvidere, Illinois, and for thirty years after 
filled pulpits in various churches near his 
home. He bought a farm three miles north 
of Genoa, which was his home until he re- 
tired from active life in 1882. He has since 
had no regular charge, but frequently fills 
pulpits in emergency, and presides at wed- 
dings and funerals whenever called upon. 

Mr. Crocker was married January i, 
1856, three miles north of Genoa, to Su- 
sannah Buck, born in Shrewsbury township, 
Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, and a 
daughter of Peter Buck, a native of Munc}', 
Pennsylvania, who came west in 1855, lo- 
cating near Genoa, where his death occurred 
at the age of si.xty-si.x years and seven 
months. In his native state he engaged in 
farming and in lumbering, having sixteen 
hundred acres of land in Lycoming county, 
Pennsylvania. He came west with a view 



of affording better opportunities for his chil- 
dren, and bought farms for each of his five 
sons in Ogle county, and a farm of five hun- 
dred acres for him.self, near Marengo. Peter 
]-5uck was a son of Henry Buck, a farmer 
and miller in Pennsylvania, who in early life 
was by trade a shoemaker, but who died 
when Peter was ten years old. He- married 
Mary Rotharmal, a native of Holland. 
Peter Buck married Louisa Holmes, born in 
the town of Shrewsbury, New Jersey, and 
who removed with her parents in girlhood 
to Shrewsbury township, Lycoming county, 
P-ennsylvania. She was the daughter of 
John and Mary (Knott) Hohnes, vvho traces 
their ancestry to Thomas Holmes, who came 
to America with William Penn. Of the 
fifteen children born to Peter Buck and 
wife, seven survi\e. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Crocker three children 
have been born. ( i ) Ellery Channing, born 
November 4, 1S57, was educated in the 
common schools, and after completing his 
education taught school some five or six 
years. After reading law at Sycamore, with 
Joseph Stephens, he was admitted to the 
bar, and for several years was engaged in 
practice at S3-camore. He married Minne- 
haha Steele, by whom he has one son. Loyal 
Ellery. He now resides in Charles Mix 
county. South Dakota, near Yankton, where 
he owns one hundred and sixty acres of land, 
and leases seventeen hundred acres from the 
Indians. (2) Jennie Virginia married Ed- 
\vard Wilcox, of Elgin, by whom she had 
one son, Ellery. Mr. Wilcox is now de- 
ceased. (3) Ora married Fred Smith, sec- 
retary of the Stover Bicycle Company, of 
Freeport, Illinois. 

In politics Mr. Crocker is a Republican, 
and an earnest advocate of the principles of 
the part}-. For many years he served as 



388 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



road cominissioner, and also as school di- 
rector of his district. Until 1S67 he was a 
member of the Christian church, since which 
time he has been connected with the Regu- 
lar Adventists. He was a member of the 
conference of northern Illinois until he re- 
tired from active service, in 1S90. He is a 
voluminous writer for the religious press, 
his specialty being in writing and expound- 
ing prophecy and translation. Fraternally 
he has been a member of the Masonic lodge 
at Genoa. 



HON. LUTHER LOWELL, ex-judge 
of the county and probate courts of 
De Kalb county, comes of one of the best 
known families in America. The family is 
one of the oldest in this country as well as 
in England, .\bout the year 1300, if not 
earlier, Walter and \\'illiam Lowle (as the 
name was then spelled 1 resided at Yeardlew 
England. Between them and Percival 
Lowle are nine generations, of whom a rec- 
ord exists, giving names of each and dates 
of birth. Perci\al Lowle, who was born in 
England in 1571, emigrated to the Ameri- 
can colonies in 1639 with Rebecca, his wife, 
and settled in Massachusetts. John Lowle, 
son of Percival, was also born in England. 
He emigrated with his wife, Mary, and four 
children in 1639, and died in 1647. His 
son Benjamin, born at Xewbur\', Massachu- 
setts, September 12, 1642, married Ruth 
\\'oodman, of Newbury, Massachusetts, 
October 17, 1666. With their son, John 
Lowell, came the change in the spelling of 
the name. His birth occurred at Newbury, 
Massachusetts, February 22, 16S3. He 
first married Mary Davis, and after her 
death married Sarah L. Bailey in 1729. 
His son David, born January 12, 1716, at 



Haverhill, Massachusetts, married Mary 
Blood, of Mason, New^ Hampshire. David's 
son Peter, born December 28, 1752, at 
Groton, Massachusetts, died in 1840 at 
Dempster, New Hampshire. He served 
through the Revolutionary war as a mem- 
ber of Captain Ezra Towner's company, in 
Colonel James Reed's regiment. He mar- 
ried Eunice Funk and to them was born in 
1793 Martin Luther Lowell, the father of 
our subject, who died in Sycamore in 1884, 
at the ripe old age of ninety-one years. He 
was a farmer by occupation, and about 1831 
moved from Brookfield, \'ermont, to Morel, 
\'ermont, and in 1S45 ^^ Bristol, in the 
same state. He married Malinda C. La- 
porte, who was born June G, 179S, in New 
Jersey. Ten of their children reached ma- 
ture life. After his children had become 
established in the west he made his home 
with them and died as already stated. 

Luther Lowell, of this sketch, was born 
in Brookfield. \'ermont. Ma}' 14, iS27,and 
was sixth in order of birth in the family of 
thirteen children born to his parents. After 
attending the district schools he entered 
Hinesburg Academy and, owing to sharp 
competition, tuition and board being very 
low in various places where academies had 
been established, he was offered good board 
at one dollar per week and changed to 
Spaulding's .\cademy at Bakerstield. He 
began teaching at the age of eighteen years, 
being large and well developed for his age. 
lintering the college at Middlebury, \'er- 
mont, he graduated in 185 i with the degree 
of A. B.. and in 1854 received that of A. M. 
A friend teaching at Ellicottville, New 
York, about fifty miles south of Buffalo, 
desiring to return to college, secured the 
school for our subject, who taught it in the 
winter of iS;i-2. He was then offered the 




HON. LUTHER LOWELL. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



39t 



principalship of the Rutland Academy and 
; served that school for two years. He was 

' next professor of Latin, Greek and rhetoric 

in the academy at Flushing, Long Island, 
and while there had as a pupil Cornelius 
Vanderbilt. 

While teaching at Flushing, Mr. Lowell 
had the misfortune to step off the landing 
in the dark, and falling down the stairway 
to the floor, had his arm broken. About 
this time his sister's husband, who had been 
living in De Kalb county, died, and for a 
change of air and to help his sister, he came 
west, arriving at Sycamore, September 29, 
1856. Before coming west he had com- 
menced to read law, and arriving here, he 
entered the law office of Mayo & James, and 
continued his reading under their instruction, 
until April, 1857, when he was admitted to 
the bar for practice in the various courts of 
Illinois. In his first year's practice he e.\- 
perienced great inconvenience on account of 
the panic of 1857. That panic, however, 
later brought him much business in the legal 
line. Soon after being admitted to the bar, 
he formed a partnership with Mayo & 
James, which continued a few months, when 
he formed a partnership with Mr. James 
and Chauncey Ellwood, which lasted about 
two years, when the partnership was dis- 
solved, and .Mr. Lowell associated with him- 
self, J. Frank Meeker, now a prominent at- 
torney in the west. 

On the 20th of February, 1859, at 
Sycamore, Illinois, Mr. Lowell was united 
in marriage with Miss Ann P, James, who 
was born May i, 1833, and the daughter of 
Levi and Cjrene (Batchelderj James. No 
children came to bless their union, but he 
and his wife reared to mature years Lavinia 
S., now wife of George ^\'. Dunton, with 
whom the Judge makes his home, and Gil- 



bert H. Denton. The latter studied law 
under the instruction of his adopted father, 
and is now in the manufacturing business in 
Denver, Colorado. 

In 1S69 Mr. Lowell was elected to the 
position of county judge, to which he was 
re-elected in 1873. On the expiration of 
his second official term, January i, 1878, he 
formed a partnership with D. J. Carnes, 
which existed until April 3, 18S3, when the 
Judge was elected to fill a vacancy in the 
position he had formerly held, made by the 
resignation of Hon. S. B. Stinson, of Sand- 
wich, Illinois. 

In his long professional career, Judge 
Lowell has much to be proud of. He has 
been eminently successful in the trial of 
cases, rarely losing a cause he espoused, and 
his arduous labors have brought him a lib- 
eral competency. His professional cares 
have been free from trickery and question- 
able practices, so often resorted to by mem- 
bers of the bar. His mind is analytical, 
logical and inductive. With a thorough and 
comprehensive knowledge of the funda- 
mental principles of law, he combines a fa- 
miliarity with statutory law, and a sober, 
clear judgment, which makes him not onl\' 
a formidable adversary in legal combat, but 
has given the distinction of being a very able 
jurist. While upon the bench, he showed 
his peculiar fitness for the position b}- his 
cool and even temperament, never being 
swayed by any of the tricks of the profes- 
sion, and when his judgment was rendered, 
it was always found to be correct in law, as 
well as in sound common sense. 

Judge Lowell has ever been a voracious 
reader, and his fine librar}'and excellent se- 
lection of books shows the bent of his mind. 
He has taken the Cincinnati Tribune since 
1863, and the Atlantic Monthly since the 



392 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



same time. Securing the previous numbers 
he now has a complete set of the Monthly, 
comprisingeighty volumes, which by his will, 
at his death, goes to the public library of 
Sycamore. 



WILLIAM WATSON, who resides on 
section 26, Paw Paw township, has 
been a resident of De Kalb county since 
185 1, a period of forty-seven years. He 
was born in Susse.x, England, April iS, 181S, 
and is the son of William Watson, Sr. , also 
a native of Susse.x, England, who there 
married Elizabeth Jarrett, a native of the 
same county, and in 1828 emigrated with 
his family to the New World, taking pas- 
sage in a sailing vessel from London, and 
being about one month on the ocean, a 
very quick passage for those days. He set- 
tled in Albany, New York, where he found 
employment in a ship yard, and there spent 
the remainder of his life. 

Our subject was but ten years of age 
when he accompanied his parents across the 
water, and in Albany, New York, grew to 
manhood. In 1838, when but twenty years 
old, he married Agnes Ferguson, a native 
of Ireland, of Scotch and English descent. 
Her father, William Ferguson, was of 
Scotch descent, while her mother was of 
English parentage. After his marriage he 
moved to Oswego, New York, where he 
learned his trade, that of carpenter and 
joiner, and was employed in his trade until 
185 1, when he came to De Kalb county, 
Illinois, joining some old neighbors from 
New York, among whom was George C. 
Cooper, who located here some three years 
previously. His first purchase was seventy 
acres of unimproved land, on which he 
erected a small house, and commenced the 



improvement of the place. For about two 
years he worked at his trade in connection 
with farming, and later purchased eighty 
acres adjoining the home place, making him 
a valuable farm of one hundred and fifty 
acres. 

To Mr. and Mrs. ^^'atson, six children 
were born, four of whom are \et living. 
One died in infancy, and Elizabeth N. grew 
to womanhood, and died when about twenty- 
eight years of age. The living are Robert 
T. , a farmer of Victor township; William, 
married, and residing in California, where he 
is engaged in the apiary business; Edward 
M., married, and residing on the old home 
farm; and James, a farmer of Paw Paw 
township. Edward M. married Ann Hare, 
a native of De Kalb county, by whom he 
has three living children. One died at the 
age of nine years. The living are James, 
Ezra G. and May. 

Politically Mr. Watson is a stanch Re- 
publican. In early life he was a Democrat, 
and cast his first presidential ballot for 
James K. Polk. He voted for Fremont in 
1856, and has cast his presidential ballot 
for every nominee of the party from that 
time to the present. He has never sought 
nor would he ever hold office. His son, 
Edward M., is also a stanch Republican. 
For almost half a century he has been a 
resident of De Kalb county. When he came 
to the county it was little better than a 
wilderness, and he has lived to see it take 
rank among the best of the great Prairie 
state. 



MYRON M. DEAN is one of the younger 
farmers of De Kalb county, and re- 
sides on section 3, Sycamore township, 
where he is engaged in general farming and 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



393 



stock raising. He was born in Genoa 
township, a short distance from his present 
residence, November 4, 1864, and is the 
son of Divine Dean, born in Sullivan coun- 
ty. New York, December 14, 1834, and who 
died September 16, 1897. Divine Dean 
grew to manhood in his native state, and 
came west at the age of twenty-one years. 
Three _\-ears later he married Lucinda 
Evans, a native of De Kalb county, born in 
Charter Grove, September 11, 1838, and a 
daughter of Benjamin and Frances (Perry) 
Evans. I-?enjamin Evans was the son of 
William and Ola (Mitchell) Evans. Frances 
Perry was a daughter of William and Char- 
ity (Dean) Perry, the former a native of 
Ashe county. North Carolina, born October 
20, 1782, and who died in Virginia at the 
age of ninety-two years. \\'illiam Perry 
was the son of Ebenzer and Christina 
Perry, and Charity Dean was a daughter of 
Jacob and Frances Dean. 

Myron M. Dean was reared on the home 
farm, and began his education in the dis- 
trict schools, then attended the Sycamore 
high schools for two years, the Paw Paw 
seminary one year, and the Genoa high 
school for two winters. He lived in Syca- 
more the greater part of the time, from 
1875 to 1879, and it was during this period 
that he attended the Sycamore high school. 
Later he resided at Anamosa, Iowa, for 
nearly two years, then returned to Syca- 
more, and subsequently removed to his 
present farm. He remained with his father 
until after attaining his majority, then 
worked for various farmers for a year and a 
half, after which he rented his father's farm, 
until the hitter's death in September, 1897, 
since which time he has continued to rent 
the estate, consisting of one hundred and 
forty acres of excellent farming land. As a 



stock farmer he has met with success, buy- 
ing and feeding for the general market. 

Mr. Dean was married in Genoa, Illi- 
nois, to Miss Lenna Z. Brown, a native of 
Genoa township, and a daughter of James 
P. and Susan Brown, of whose family a 
more extended account is found elsewhere 
in this work. By this union two children 
have been born, Jessie and Earl. In poli- 
tics Mr. Dean is thoroughly independent, 
voting for men, not party. 



JOHN S. AMES is the owner of a farm 
comprising one hundred and sixteen and 
a quarter acres in section 32, Shabbona 
township. He was born in Norfolk, Eng- 
land, June 29, 1848, and is the son of Will- 
iam and Ann (Smith) Ames, both natives 
of England, where their entire lives were 
spent, both dying when about ninety years 
of age. He grew to manhood in Norfolk 
and Suffolk, and in his boyhood had fair 
common-school advantages. He was reared 
on a farm and later was employed on the 
public works. He was married in Suffolk, 
October 11, 1868, to Eliza Levell, a native 
of Suffolk, England, and a daughter of 
James Levell, who was a contractor on the 
public works, and also engaged in office 
work, being a man of fine education. Mr. 
and Mrs. Ames attended the same school 
and grew to man and .vomanhood in the 
same locality. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ames commenced their 
domestic life in Suffolk, where he ran a 
small store which he continued a few )'ears, 
then sold out and in 1874 came to the Uni- 
ted States. Landing at New York, they 
came direct to De Kalb county, Illinois, 
where some English friends were residing, 
and through whose influence thev came to 



394 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



this couiitr}-. On their arrival Mr. Ames 
went to work on the farm by the day and 
nionth at Greentown and there resided for 
three years. He then rented a farm in 
Shabbona township for eight }-ears, and in 
1885 purchased the farm where they now 
reside. The place was slightly improved, 
but since locating here he has added to the 
improvements already made by tiling the 
land and the erection of a dwelling house 
and \'arious outbuildings. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ames are the parents of 
four children. Anna is the wife of Dave 
Ferguson, a farmer of Shabbona township. 
Charles J. married and engaged in farming 
in Shabbona township. Nettie M. is a well- 
educated young lady and a teacher in the 
public schools of De Kalb county. George 
.■\. is a young man residing at home and as- 
sisting in the cultivation of the home farm. 

In 1884 Mr. Ames cast his first presi- 
dential vote for James G. Blaine, and has 
since given his support to the men and 
measures of the Republican party. Averse 
to office holding, he has yet been prevailed 
upon to serve as director in his school dis- 
trict, being a stanch advocate of good 
schools. While not members, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ames are attendants of the West Shabbona 
Methodist Episcopal church. Fraternally 
they are both members of the Home Forum. 



HEN'RY EUHUS is one of that great 
number of men who came from the 
fatherland to free America, that they might 
have an opportunity to better their condi- 
tion in life, and who by their industry and 
thrift, have added greatly to the material 
wealth of the country. He was born in 
Hanover, Prussia, Germany, November 4, 
1842, and is the son of Jacob and Mary 



(Mylker) Euhus, both natives of the same 
country. Jacob Euhus was a soldier in the 
Prussian army for ten years, and had his 
nose and one ear shot off in battle. In 
] 855 he left his native land for America, and 
was seven weeks on the ocean. Landing at 
New Orleans, from there he came up the 
Mississippi river to St. Louis, then to Du- 
buque, Iowa, and from there to Freeport, 
Illinois, where he was accidentally killed on 
the railroad, lea\-ing a widow and son in a 
strange land. The widow later married 
again, choosing for her husband John Ackert, 
also a native of Germany. He enlisted in 
Company F, Forty-fifth Regiment, Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry, at Cherry \'alley, Illi- 
nois, and was killed in battle at Fort Henry. 
His widow later received a pension, and 
two himdred dollars back pay. Henry 
Euhus was the only son of Jacob and Mary 
Euhus, and was thirteen years old when he 
accompanied his parents to the- United 
States. His education was obtained in 
his native land, having only the privi- 
lege of attending school for two months 
after his arrival in this countr}'. The sud- 
den death of his father rendered it neces- 
sary that he should make a living for him- 
self. He grew to manhood in Winnebago 
county, and on the loth of January, 1S66, 
married Miss Rosetta Miller, a native of 
Switzerland, and a daughter of Rudolph and 
Elizabeth (Lesher) Miller, both natives of 
the same country, and who were the parents 
of but two children, Malissa and Rosetta. 
Mrs. Euhus came to the United States in 
1859, with her parents, who first located in 
Portsmouth, Ohio, and in i860 came to 
De Kalb county, Illinois. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Euhus twelve children 
have been born, four of whom died in in- 
fancy. Those living are John, William, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



395 



Lizzie, Emma, Fred, Elmer, Joseph and 
and Hattie. Religiousl}- he and his wife are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and in politics he is a Republican. Mr. 
Euhus started in life without a cent, and 
for years worked by the month for various 
farmers and others, and it required some 
years of toil before he was enabled to make 
his first purchase of land. In 1867 he 
purchased forty acres in Franklin township, 
near Kirkland, on section 14, and at once 
commenced its improvement. From time 
to time he added to his possessions until he 
has now two hundred and thirty acres, all of 
\\-hich is under the highest state of cultiva- 
tion, with improvements in keeping with the 
day and age. 



ALFRED KING, deceased, was a well- 
known citizen of Genoa township, re- 
siding on section 34. He was born in the 
town of Braceville, Trumbull county, Ohio, 
May 24, 1848, and was the son of William 
King, born June 6, 181 7, in Esse.x county, 
New York, and the grandson of Reuben and 
Roxina (De Wolf) King, both natives of 
Massachusetts, who in an early day moved 
to New York. William King married Mrs. 
Hannah (Dowd) Miller, widow of William 
Miller, and a native of New York, born De- 
cember 12, 1817. Of their five children, 
Alfred was third in order of birth. William 
King died at Tilden, Madison county, Ne- 
braska, May 5, 1888. 

Alfred King came to Illinois at the age 
of five years, and was reared on the old 
homestead taken up by his father on sec- 
tion 3, Genoa township. His education 
was obtained in the district schools, and 
he began farming for himself at the age of 
eighteen years. He first rented some land, 



but soon purchased eighty acres, with some 
assistance received from his father. He later 
sold that tract and put the money out at in- 
terest and lost it all, and thus had to begin 
with nothing again. He soon bought a farm 
in Genoa township, where Mrs. King now 
resides, and later a farm adjoining, giving 
him two hundred and forty-eight acres in 
Genoa township, together with thirty acres 
of timber land in Sycamore township. He 
became quite prosperous and a very highly 
respected man. In politics he was a Republi- 
can, and served for many years as a school 
director. At the time of his death, which 
occurred July 31, 1897, he was a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, and 
took great interest in the Sunday-school 
work, being a teacher in the school. 

x\Ifred King was twice married, first with 
Mary Belinda Evans, daughter of Benjamin 
and Francis (Perry) Evans, and to them 
were born one son, William L. King, of 
whom mention is made elsewhere in this 
work. His second union was with Miss Fan- 
nie Hunt and the marriage ceremony was 
celebrated June 14, 1882. She was born in 
Lisbon, Kendall county, Illinois, but resided 
the most of her life near Morris, Grundy 
county, Illinois, her education being re- 
ceived in the district school, and a select 
school at Morris, Illinois. She taught 
school for many terms in Grundy county. 
She is a daughter of Peleg T. Hunt, born in 
the town of West Lebanon, Columbia 
county. New York, August 10, 1823, and 
who went to Rensselaer county with his 
parents in the summer of 1836. where he 
attended the district school until the age of 
twenty-one years. His father, William F. 
Hunt, was also a native of Columbia coun- 
ty, born in February, 1798, and died in 
March, tS66, in Grundy county, Illinois. 



396 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



William F. Hunt was a son of Capt. Will- 
iam Hunt, a farmer, born in Norwich, 
Connecticut, in 176S and died in 1853. 
His wife \\as Susanna Fellows, born in 
1768 and died in 1854. His title of cap- 
tain was derived from service in the war of 
1812, as commander of a militia company. 
William F. Hunt married Betsy Tabor, 
born in Rensselaer, New York, in Septem- 
ber, 1791, and a daughter of Gresham Ta- 
bor, who married Anna Finch, a daughter 
of Joseph Finch. Mrs. Betsy Hunt died in 
1878. Peleg T. Hunt was married in Nas- 
sau, Rensselaer county, New York, Decem- 
ber 3, 1846, to Mary Cummings, a native 
of that town and county, born February 9, 
1827, and a daughter of Russell D. and 
Sophia (Thomas) Cummings, her father 
being a son of Abel Cummings, and her 
mother a daughter of Silas and Chloe (Very) 
Thomas. To Peleg T. and Mary Hunt four 
children were born, as follows: George W., 
a grain dealer of Charter Grove; Mrs. Leo- 
nora J. Hutchinson, of Joliet, Illinois; Mrs. 
Frances King, widow of our subject; and 
Mrs. Emma L. Hutchinson, of Joliet. 

To Mr. and Mrs. King three children 
were born: Howard Hunt, Harvey Elbert 
and Edna Jeannette. Mrs. King, who is a 
woman of superior ability, is yet carrying 
on the home farm. She is well known and 
has many friends in Genoa and Sycamore 
townships. 



JE. STOTT, dealer in real estate and 
the efficient mayor of Genoa, was born 
in Maine township. Cook county, Illinois, 
May 2, 1S46. His father, Uriah Stott, was 
a nati\'e of Yorkshire, England, born in 
1826, and who came to America in 1S43, 
coining direct tii Cook count\-, Illinois, 



where he purchased the farm on which our 
subject was born. He married Eh'zabeth 
M. Thornton, also a native of Yorkshire, 
England, who was killed in a runaway at 
Rand's bridge, over the Des Plaines river, in 
Cook county. This was in August, 1884, 
her death occurring when she was sixty- 
eight years old. By trade Uriah Stott was 
a tailor and clothier, but engaged in farm- 
ing in Cook county. In politics he was a 
Republican, and held many of the local 
offices in that county. He was a Quaker by 
birth, but united with the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, in which faith he tlied. .After 
the death of his wife he retired from active 
business life and moved to Rockford, Illi- 
nois, where his death occurred January 13, 
1892. ^^'ith his wife he twice visited his 
native land after coming to America, but 
both returned to die in their new home. 
They were the parents of five children : 
William T., of Barrington, Illinois ; J. E., 
our subject ; Joseph \\'., of Des Plaines, 
Illinois ; Elizabeth Ann, who died at the 
age of thirteen years, and Charles, residing 
at Des Plaines. 

The subject of this sketch grew to man- 
hood on his father's farm in Cook county 
and attended the district school until the 
age of eighteen years. He then spent two 
years in Danforth's Commercial College in 
Chicago, after which he clerked in a gro- 
cery store in that city for a short time. In 
the spring of 1866, in partnership with a 
brother, he engaged in merchandising in 
Chicago, and later removed to Barrington, 
Cook county, where he continued in the 
mercantile business until 1S75. He then 
moved to Genoa and engaged in merchan- 
dising, in which he continued until 1S84, 
when he sold out, since which time he has 
been in the real-estate business and has 



:"HE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



397 



handled much local real estate, while deal- 
ing quite extensive!}' in southern and west- 
ern lands. In 1S92 he laid out forty-eight 
acres, which comprises Stott's addition to 
Genoa. He has a farm of one hundred and 
thirty-five acres near the village, in which 
his sons are interested in the breeding of 
Shetland ponies and registered stock. He 
is also interested in Chicago real estate and 
has some fine holdings in that cit)'. 

Mr. .Stott was married in Fremont Cen- 
ter, Lake county, Illinois, October 30, 1872, 
to Miss Josephine M. Millard, of that place, 
born December 1 1, 1849, and a daughter of 
Johnson and Arvilla M. (Houghton) Millard, 
the latter now living in Wauconda, Lake 
county, Illinois, at the age of si.xty-eight 
years. Johnson Millard was a native of 
\'ermont, and in 1850 crossed the plains to 
California, where he remained five years. 
His death occurred in October, 1882. To 
our subject and wife eight children have 
been born, all of whom are yet living. 
Frank H. is employed in the office of the 
Swiss consul in Chicago. Gilbert E. read 
law with Stephens & Early, of Sycamore, 
was admitted to the bar, June 7, 1897, since 
which time he has been engaged in practice 
in Genoa. Grace E., James R. , Zoe A., 
Alfred W., Paul E. and Marcus Victor, yet 
remain at home. 

In politics Mr. Stott is a thorough Re- 
publican, and takes an acti\e interest in po- 
litical affairs. He was township treasurer 
while residing in Harrington, and since com- 
ing to Genoa has served some fifteen years 
as a member of the board of education. 
For the past six j'ears he has been mayor 
of the village, the duties of which office he 
discharges faithfully and to the satisfaction 
of all. Fraternally he is a member of Odd 
Fellows, including the Rebecca degree, the 



Knights of the Maccabees, and Modern 
\\'oodmcn of x\merica. As an official he 
has the best interests of his town at heart, 
and freely gi\'es of his time to advance its 
material interests. 



LESTER J. BROWNE, one of the 
younger and highly esteemed farmers 
of De Kalb county, owns and culti\-ates an 
excellent piece of farm land situated on sec- 
tion II, Milan township, and comprising one 
hundred and twenty acres. In improve- 
ments, yield and fertility, his property ranks 
with the best in the county. The residence 
and outbuildings are thoroughly modern, 
and all the improvements, such as fencing, 
tiling, and abundance of shade trees, indi- 
cate a pride and interest in its possession. 
Mr. Browne is a native of De Kalb coun- 
ty, born on the farm where he now resides, 
July 29, 1-860. His father, Nathaniel 
Browne, was reared and educated within 
three miles of Londonderry, Ireland, and 
comes from a family celebrated for their 
educational attainments, culture and integ- 
rity. His brother, William, a highly re- 
spected citizen and leading property owner 
of De Kalb county, is a Methodist preacher 
of high repute throughout this section, and 
another brother, who now cultivates the 
home farm in Ireland, studied and graduated 
in law and for several years was a success- 
ful practitioner. Nathaniel was the oldest 
member of the family, and by English law 
the right of primogeniture gave him at his 
father's death all right and title to the fa- 
ther's property, which was considerable. 
Being both young and ambitious and desir- 
ing to see the world, and be the builder of 
his own fortunes, he relinquished all claim 
to his prospective inheritance, and with his 



398 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



brother, William, came to America in 1S55 
and located on a quarter section in Milan 
township, De Kalb count)', Illinois. At 
that time the country was thinly settled, 
but with persistence born of determination, 
a Iiealthful vigor and industrious habits, he 
set about cultivating the wild prairie lands, 
making such improvements as his means and 
facilities afforded. On the death of Na- 
thaniel Browne, April 19, 1S96, his farm 
land, consisting of two hundred acres, was 
bequeathed to his son, Lester J., and his 
daughter, Mrs. \\'. H. Smith, the former 
securing one hundred and twenty acres, and 
the latter eighty acres. The mother now 
resides with her daughter, Mrs. Smith, in 
Milan township. 

Lester J. Browne's school days covered 
the period of his life up to twenty years of 
age. After an elementary education, se- 
cured in the neighboring district schools, 
he entered Jennings Seminary at Aurora and 
for a period studied to acquire a liberal ed- 
ucation. Leaving the seminary he returned 
to the farm and began in earnest the life of 
a farmer On the 22d of February, 1890, 
he married an estimable lady. Miss Sarah G. 
Smith, daughter of Henry W. Smith, a well- 
to-do retired farmer residing at De Kalb. 
They are the parents of three children, Les- 
lie N., Henry W. , deceased, and William C. 

Appreciating educational advantages, 
and fully alive to the fact that the standard 
of citizenship is raised through and by means 
of the school room, Mr. Browne has at all 
times given the public schools his ardent 
support. His acti\-ity in this direction is 
best understood when it is known that 
nearly all the inter\ening _vears since his ma- 
jorit)- he has, in his capacity of school di- 
director, given close attention to educational 
affairs. 



Mr. Browne is a member of the Repub- 
lican party, and his ballot is cast in the in- 
dorsement of its principles and for the nom- 
inees of the conventions of his party, 
whether national, state or county. Follow- 
ing the tradititons and convictions of his 
ancestors, he is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and responds promptly to 
its support by active co-operation in all its 
work. He is of a quiet and retiring dispo- 
sition, affable in address and manners, and 
is one of De Kalb county's younger farmers 
whose probity and honorable methods find 
recognition in th